The Washington State University Catalog

Department of Horticulture

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

Department of Horticulture

horticulture.wsu.edu
Johnson Hall 149
509-335-9502

Regents Professor, B. W. Poovaiah; Professors, L. K. Chalker-Scott, K. M. Evans, M. Keller, D. S. Main, C. A. Miles, S. Musacchi, M. J. Pavek, C. P. Peace, M. D. Whiting; Associate Professors, B. R. Bondada, L. W. DeVetter, S. P. Ficklin, L. A. Kalcsits, M. M. Moyer; Assistant Professors, T. S. Collins, P. M. McCord, C. A. Torres; Associate Research Professor and Instructor, M. G. Kumar; Assistant Research Professors, Y. Ma, R. M. Sharpe; Associate Research Professor, S. Jung; Senior Instructor, C. Kawula; Adjunct/Affiliate Faculty, C. Benedict, C. J. Coyne, A. Dhingra, I. Hanrahan, G. A. Hoheisel, L. A. Honaas, P. E. Jacoby, J. P. Mattheis, J. R. McFerson, R. McGee, D. W. McMoran, R. Navarre, D. R. Rudell, M. R. Salazar-Gutiérrez, , R. K. Thornton, T. D. Waters, M. J. Willett, C. Wohleb, W. H. Wolfe, T. Yang, I. Zasada, Y. Zhang; Professors Emeriti, M. Ahmedullah, P. K. Andrews, L. R. Askham, D. C. Elfving, J. K. Fellman, W. G. Hendrix, L. K. Hiller, R. Hummel, W. M. Iritani, L. Knowles, N. R. Knowles, F. E. Larsen, V. Lohr, R. Maleike, P. P. Moore, M. E. Patterson, E. Proebsting, J. M. Roberts, L. E. Schrader, K. A. Struckmeyer, R. E. Thornton.

The Department of Horticulture offers programs of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Integrated Plant Sciences, Bachelor of Science in Agricultural and Food Systems, Bachelor of Science in Viticulture and Enology, Master of Science in Horticulture, Master of Science in Agriculture, Doctor of Philosophy in Horticulture, and Doctor of Philosophy in Molecular Plant Sciences. A minor in Horticulture is also available.

INTEGRATED PLANT SCIENCES AND AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD SYSTEMS

The science of plant life from molecule to market is the focus of the Integrated Plant Sciences (IPS) Degree program. Delivered collaboratively by departments within the College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences, the IPS degree provides students with an exciting depth and breadth of knowledge that crosses a variety of plant science disciplines, including crop and soil sciences, horticulture, entomology, plant pathology, and food science. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Integrated Plant Sciences may choose among five majors highly sought by employers in the state, nationally, and internationally: Agricultural Biotechnology; Field Crop Management; Fruit and Vegetable Management; Landscape, Nursery, and Greenhouse Management; or Turfgrass Management. More information regarding IPS is available under the Integrated Plant Sciences catalog section and at http://ips.wsu.edu.

The department is also involved with the College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences interdisciplinary Agricultural and Food Systems Degree Program. The Agricultural and Food Systems (AFS) program is an exciting, college-wide, interdisciplinary program that offers a Bachelor of Science degree with five majors and a Master of Science degree. Majors available through AFS include Agricultural Technology and Production Management, Agricultural Education, Organic and Sustainable Agriculture, Agricultural and Food Business Economics, and Agriculture and Food Security. More information regarding AFS is available under the Agricultural and Food Systems catalog section and at http://afs.wsu.edu.

Students are encouraged to participate as part-time employees in research programs and seek professional internships for applied learning experiences. Departmental and college scholarships are available based on ability, need, and interest. Students gain professional and social contacts with the faculty and other students through student club activities, including Horticulture Club.

Agricultural Biotechnology

The Agricultural Biotechnology major is designed for students interested in careers such as laboratory or research technicians in plant biotechnology, breeding, genetics, entomology, plant pathology, molecular biology, or physiology, as well as for students preparing for advanced degrees in these areas. The program emphasizes the development and application of new technology to ensure a safe and abundant food and fiber supply. Students may find employment in industry, government, or university labs.

Fruit and Vegetable Management

The Fruit and Vegetable Management major offers specialization in the science and practice of growing, harvesting, handling, storing, processing, and marketing tree fruits, small fruits, and vegetables. Graduates can look forward to careers as growers and farm managers, production field advisors, sales representatives in the horticultural services industry, managers of produce firms, and brokers and marketers of fruit and vegetable products.

Landscape, Nursery, and Greenhouse Management

The Landscape, Nursery, and Greenhouse Management major is a horticulture-based program that prepares students for opportunities in plant propagation, the production and marketing of potted crops, bedding plants, trees, shrubs, and cut flowers, and in landscape plant management. This is an exciting major for students interested in owning or managing a nursery or greenhouse, attending graduate school in horticulture, working for university extension offices and research greenhouses, maintaining landscapes and parks, or working as wholesale horticultural-product brokers.

VITICULTURE AND ENOLOGY

The BS in Viticulture and Enology is for students interested in wine-grape growing and winemaking, as well as contributing to critical research and development opportunities in the wine industry. This program offers the technical, scientific, and practical experience needed to gain the essential skills for producing high quality grapes and premium table wines. It prepares students for successful careers in the wine industry in Washington and beyond. A unique feature of this degree is that students have the flexibility to begin their coursework on either the Pullman or Tri-Cities campus, but must finish on the Tri-Cities campus. 

Undergraduate Transfer Students

Students planning to transfer to Washington State University should take courses which meet the University Common Requirements (UCORE), and that meet the core requirements for Integrated Plant Sciences and Agricultural and Food Systems. Students are strongly encouraged to consult with an advisor within the Department of Horticulture for further guidance.

Preparation for Graduate Study

Preparation for graduate study requires the selection of courses that will benefit later work toward a Master of Science or a Doctor of Philosophy degree. Normally, preparation for an advanced degree in horticulture includes course work outlined under one of the majors with a strong emphasis in plant sciences, chemistry, environmental science, genetics, mathematics, and statistics.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Please see the School of Design and Construction in this catalog for information about Landscape Architecture.




Minors

Horticulture

A minimum of 16 hours in courses carrying a HORT subject is required, of which at least 9 hours must be in 300-400-level courses and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. A maximum of 3 hours of the 16 hours may be from the following courses: HORT 399, 495, 499.


Viticulture and Enology

The minor in Viticulture and Enology requires at least 16 credit hours of course work, 9 of which must be in the 300-400 level and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. The minor requires VIT ENOL 113, 313, and 422, and 7 additional credit hours from BIOLOGY 420, FS 460, HBM 350, PL P 300, SOIL SCI 201, or any VIT ENOL course - with the following exception:  No more than 4 credits of VIT ENOL 399, 495, 496, or 499 may be used towards this minor. At least 3 of the 7 additional credits must be upper division.  Courses not in the elective course list may be used with advisor approval.   
 



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Horticulture (HORT)



102 Introduction to Cultivated Plants 3 Exploring cultivated plant classification and morphology, crop reproduction, basic plant processes, and the biotic and abiotic factors which can influence these processes. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 102, CROP SCI 102). Typically offered Fall.

150 [BSCI] Science and Art of Growing Plants 4 (3-3) Understand and apply the science behind how plants grow and the art of growing plants for personal and commercial use. Typically offered Spring.

202 Crop Growth and Development 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: HORT/ CROP SCI 102. Morphology, anatomy, growth and development of agronomic and horticultural crops. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 202, CROP SCI 202). Typically offered Spring.

310 Pomology 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106, BIOLOGY 107, BIOLOGY 120, or HORT 202. Botany, history, production, and uses of temperate-zone tree and small fruit crops. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

313 Viticulture 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106, BIOLOGY 107, BIOLOGY 120, or HORT 202. Botanical relationships, plant characteristics, fruiting habits, location, culture, marketing, and utilization of grapes, berries, and other small or bush fruits. Field trip required. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 313, VIT ENOL 313). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

320 Olericulture 3 Science, business, and art of vegetable crop production: culture, fertility, growth, physiology, handling, marketing; garden, commercial, greenhouse, tropical, specialty vegetables. Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 106, BIOLOGY 107, BIOLOGY 120, or HORT 202. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

321 Olericulture Laboratory 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HORT 320. Production principles and practices of vegetable crops; plant characteristics, cultivars, nutrition, growth, and development. Field trip required. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

330 Landscape Plants for Urban and Community Environments 3 (2-3) Plants for solving problems in human-dominated landscapes: their characteristics, functions such as storm water management and climate change mitigation, ecology, identification, and selection. Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 120 or HORT 202. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

330 (Effective through Summer 2021) Landscape Plants for Urban and Community Environments 3 (2-3) Plants for solving problems in human-dominated landscapes: their characteristics, functions such as storm water management and climate change mitigation, ecology, identification, and selection. Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 120 or HORT 202. Typically offered Fall.

331 Landscape Plant Installation and Management 3 (2-3) Principles and practices for installation and management of interior and exterior landscapes; specifications, site preparation transplanting, growth control, problem diagnosis. Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 106, BIOLOGY 107, BIOLOGY 120, HORT 202, HORT 231, or HORT 232. Typically offered Spring.

332 Interior Plantscaping 3 Design, selection, installation, management, and maintenance of plantings within buildings; effects of interior plants on people and the environment. Recommended preparation: 3 hours BIOLOGY or HORT. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

346 Landscape Irrigation Systems 3 (2-3) System component selection; layout, installation, operation of irrigation systems for turf and landscape plantings; basic system hydraulics; efficient water use.

350 Food Systems in Western Washington 3 Course Prerequisite: CROP SCI/HORT 102; ECONS 101; SOIL SCI 201. Introduction to local and regional food systems unique to western Washington with an emphasis on the farm-to-table processes of foods and beverages. (Course offered as HORT 350, AFS 350). Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

351 Plant Propagation 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106, BIOLOGY 107, BIOLOGY 120, or HORT 202. Physiological and biochemical basis for sexual and asexual propagation of plants by seed, cutting, layering, grafting, budding, specialized plant structures and micropropagation. Field trip required. Typically offered Spring.

357 Greenhouse Management and Crop Production 3 Importance of greenhouse structure and operational systems to quality plant production; production requirements for spring greenhouse crops. Recommended preparation: 3 hours BIOLOGY or HORT. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

358 Greenhouse Management and Crop Production Lab 1 (0-2) Course Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in HORT 357. Production practices for spring greenhouse crops. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

399 Professional Work Experience V 1 (0-3) to 4 (0-12) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Viticulture and Enology major, IPS major or by interview; junior standing. Planned and supervised work experience. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 399, VIT ENOL 399). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

399 (Effective through Summer 2021) Professional Work Experience V 1 (0-3) to 4 (0-12) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the IPS major or by interview; junior standing. Planned and supervised work experience. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 399, VIT ENOL 399). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

409 Seminar in Viticulture and Enology 1 Current topics and recent developments in the field of viticulture and enology. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 409, VIT ENOL 409). Typically offered Fall.

413 Advanced Viticulture 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 420; HORT 313; SOIL SCI 201. Wine and juice grape production in eastern Washington; wine and fruit physiology, climate and soils, and fruit quality. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 413, VIT ENOL 413). Credit not granted for both HORT/VIT ENOL 413 and HORT 513. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

416 Advanced Horticultural Crop Physiology 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106, BIOLOGY 107, BIOLOGY 120, or HORT 202; junior standing. Physiological processes related to growth, development, and productivity of horticultural crops; advances in recombinant DNA technology; the impact on horticultural practices. Credit not granted for both HORT 416 and HORT 516. Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 420. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

418 [M] Post-harvest Biology and Technology 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 420. Physical and physiological basis for handling and storage practices; perishable organ ontogeny and physiological disorders; post-harvest environment requirements. Field trip required. Credit not granted for both HORT 418 and HORT 518. Recommended preparation: HORT 202. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

421 Fruit Crops Management 3 Course Prerequisite: 6 hours HORT, BIOLOGY, or VIT ENOL. Current research and management strategies for production and quality of temperate-zone fruit crops. Credit not granted for both HORT 421 and HORT 521. Recommended preparation: HORT 310 or HORT 313. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

425 [CAPS] [M] Trends in Integrated Plant Sciences 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Critical examination of current impacts and future trends in plant sciences. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 425, CROP SCI 425.) Typically offered Spring.

435 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Fruit and Wine 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 420; MBIOS 101 or 305; MBIOS 303 or CHEM 370. Study of the chemistry and biochemistry of fruits; biochemistry and physiology of individual fruit compounds, aspects of processing including winemaking. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 435, VIT ENOL 435). Credit not granted for both HORT/VIT ENOL 435 and HORT 535. Recommended preparation: Analytical chemistry. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

440 Winery Operations and Equipment 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 345. Major equipment and unit operations in the winemaking process, with primary focus on operations from receipt of grapes through bottling process. (Crosslisted course offered as VIT ENOL 440, HORT 440). Typically offered Spring.

441 Winery Operations and Equipment Lab Field Trip 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: VIT ENOL 113; VIT ENOL/HORT 440 or concurrent enrollment. Lab companion course for VIT ENOL/HORT 440; offered only as a week-long field trip over spring break to visit wineries and wine industry suppliers; specific visits will vary by year, but will include visits to two or three wineries, at least one cooperage and several equipment and packaging suppliers; requires participation for all 5 days of spring break. (Crosslisted course offered as VIT ENOL 441, HORT 441). Typically offered Spring.

445 [M] Plant Breeding 4 Genetic principles underlying plant breeding and an introduction to the principles and practices of plant breeding. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 445, HORT 445). Typically offered Even Years - Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

480 Plant Genomics and Biotechnology 3 Course Prerequisite: MBIOS/BIOLOGY 301. Advanced concepts in plant genomics and biotechnology with emphasis on approaches, techniques, and application. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 480, CROP SCI 480). Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 420 or HORT 416. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

495 Research Experience V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: Not open to graduate students. Planned and supervised undergraduate research experience. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 495, HORT 495, SOIL SCI 495). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

503 Advanced Topics in Horticulture V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 hours. Current topics and research techniques in horticulture. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

508 Research Orientation and Presentation 2 Develop knowledge, skills and experience needed for development of graduate research project proposals and communication of research to scientific audiences via oral presentations, posters, and written summaries. Typically offered Spring.

509 Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Continuous enrollment required for regularly enrolled graduate students in horticulture. Recent developments in horticulture. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

510 Graduate Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Literature reviews and research progress reports. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

513 Advanced Viticulture 3 Wine and juice grape production in eastern Washington; wine and fruit physiology, climate and soils, and fruit quality. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 413, VIT ENOL 413). Credit not granted for both HORT/VIT ENOL 413 and HORT 513. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

516 Advanced Horticultural Crop Physiology 3 Physiological processes related to growth, development, and productivity of horticultural crops; advances in recombinant DNA technology; the impact on horticultural practices. Credit not granted for both HORT 416 and HORT 516. Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 420. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

518 [M] Post-harvest Biology and Technology 3 (2-3) Physical and physiological basis for handling and storage practices; perishable organ ontogeny and physiological disorders; post-harvest environment requirements. Field trip required. Credit not granted for both HORT 418 and HORT 518. Recommended preparation: HORT 202. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

521 Fruit Crops Management 3 Current research and management strategies for production and quality of temperate-zone fruit crops. Credit not granted for both HORT 421 and HORT 521. Recommended preparation: HORT 310 or HORT 313. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

522 Data Analysis in Systems Biology 3 Methods and modeling of biological data analysis including computer skills, network science, and hypothesis development as applied to gene co-expression, regulatory, protein-protein interaction, and metabolic network models. Recommended preparation: Introductory coursework covering topics of general statistics, genomics, and protein structure and function. Typically offered Fall.

522 (Effective through Summer 2021) Data Analysis in Systems Biology 3 Methods and modeling of biological data analysis including computer skills, network science, and hypothesis development as applied to gene co-expression, regulatory, protein-protein interaction, and metabolic network models. Recommended preparation: Introductory coursework covering topics of general statistics, genomics, and protein structure and function. Typically offered Fall.

535 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Fruit and Wine 3 Study of the chemistry and biochemistry of fruits; biochemistry and physiology of individual fruit compounds, aspects of processing including winemaking. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 435, VIT ENOL 435). Credit not granted for both HORT/VIT ENOL 435 and HORT 535. Recommended preparation: Analytical chemistry. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

545 Statistical Genomics 3 (2-3) Develop concepts and analytical skills for modern breeding by using Genome-Wide Association Study and genomic prediction in framework of mixed linear models and Bayesian approaches. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 545, ANIM SCI 545, BIOLOGY 545, HORT 545, PL P 545.) Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 474; MBIOS 478. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

550 Bioinformatics for Research 4 (3-3) Foundational knowledge about advanced bioinformatics analyses of next-generation sequencing data. Recommended preparation: Molecular Biology and/or Genetics. Typically offered Spring.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Horticulture PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


Viticulture & Enology (VIT_ENOL)



113 Introduction to Vines and Wines 3 The importance of viticulture (grape growing) and enology (winemaking); wine quality. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

313 Viticulture 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106, BIOLOGY 107, BIOLOGY 120, or HORT 202. Botanical relationships, plant characteristics, fruiting habits, location, culture, marketing, and utilization of grapes, berries, and other small or bush fruits. Field trip required. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 313, VIT ENOL 313). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

399 Professional Work Experience V 1 (0-3) to 4 (0-12) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Viticulture and Enology major, IPS major or by interview; junior standing. Planned and supervised work experience. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 399, VIT ENOL 399). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

399 (Effective through Summer 2021) Professional Work Experience V 1 (0-3) to 4 (0-12) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the IPS major or by interview; junior standing. Planned and supervised work experience. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 399, VIT ENOL 399). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

409 Seminar in Viticulture and Enology 1 Current topics and recent developments in the field of viticulture and enology. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 409, VIT ENOL 409). Typically offered Fall.

413 Advanced Viticulture 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 420; HORT 313; SOIL SCI 201. Wine and juice grape production in eastern Washington; wine and fruit physiology, climate and soils, and fruit quality. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 413, VIT ENOL 413). Credit not granted for both HORT/VIT ENOL 413 and HORT 513. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

422 Sensory Evaluation of Food and Wine 3 Course Prerequisite: STAT 212; FS 110 or VIT ENOL 113. Theory, principles and application of sensory evaluation techniques in appearance, aroma, flavor and texture of foods and wine. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

433 [CAPS] [M] Critical Thinking in Vineyard and Winery Management 3 Course Prerequisite: VIT ENOL 313; VIT ENOL 413 or concurrent enrollment; VIT ENOL 440 or concurrent enrollment. Expansion and application of previous learning in viticulture and enology to develop economic and environmentally sustainable vineyard and winery management plans. Typically offered Spring.

435 Chemistry and Biochemistry of Fruit and Wine 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 420; MBIOS 101 or 305; MBIOS 303 or CHEM 370. Study of the chemistry and biochemistry of fruits; biochemistry and physiology of individual fruit compounds, aspects of processing including winemaking. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 435, VIT ENOL 435). Credit not granted for both HORT/VIT ENOL 435 and HORT 535. Recommended preparation: Analytical chemistry. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

440 Winery Operations and Equipment 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 345. Major equipment and unit operations in the winemaking process, with primary focus on operations from receipt of grapes through bottling process. (Crosslisted course offered as VIT ENOL 440, HORT 440). Typically offered Spring.

441 Winery Operations and Equipment Lab Field Trip 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: VIT ENOL 113; VIT ENOL/HORT 440 or concurrent enrollment. Lab companion course for VIT ENOL/HORT 440; offered only as a week-long field trip over spring break to visit wineries and wine industry suppliers; specific visits will vary by year, but will include visits to two or three wineries, at least one cooperage and several equipment and packaging suppliers; requires participation for all 5 days of spring break. (Crosslisted course offered as VIT ENOL 441, HORT 441). Typically offered Spring.

465 Wine Microbiology and Processing 3 Course Prerequisite: MBIOS 303; MBIOS 101 or 305. Technical principles related to the processing and fermentation of wines with an emphasis on microbiology. (Crosslisted course offered as FS 465, VIT ENOL 465). Credit not granted for both FS/VIT ENOL 465 and FS 565. Recommended preparation for graduate students: MBIOS 303; MBIOS 304; MBIOS 101 or 305. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

466 Wine Microbiology and Processing Laboratory 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: FS 465 or concurrent enrollment; MBIOS 101 or 304. Hands-on winemaking; application of chemical microbiological methods for wine analysis. Field trip required. (Crosslisted course offered as FS 466, VIT ENOL 466). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

496 Internship in a Winery 2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Industrial assignments at a regional, national or international winery. (Crosslisted course offered as FS 496, VIT ENOL 496). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

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