The Washington State University Catalog

Department of Animal Sciences

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

Department of Animal Sciences

ansci.wsu.edu/
Clark Hall 116
509-335-5523

Professor and Chair, G. K. Murdoch; Professors, M. Du, Z. Jiang, K. A. Johnson, H. L. Neibergs; Associate Professors, A. Adams-Progar; Assistant Professors, N. Law, M. Marcondes, M. Phelps; Clinical Associate Professors, N. A. Irlbeck, M. Maquivar; Instructors, C. Matuk-Sarinana, B. McCann, A. L. Reitmeier, J. Swain; Adjunct and Affiliate Faculty, T. Hudson, P. S. Kuber, D. A. Llewellyn, S. M. Smith, K. Steensma; Faculty Emeriti, M. E. Benson, J. R. Busboom, M. V. Dodson, L. K. Fox, C. T. Gaskins, R. L. Kincaid, J. P. McNamara, D. D. Nelson, M. L. Nelson, J. J. Reeves, R. W. Wright.

The Department of Animal Sciences offers courses of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Animal Sciences, Master of Science in Animal Sciences, and Doctor of Philosophy (Animal Sciences). The department participates in the Joint Program for Animal Sciences and Veterinary Medicine, leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Animal Sciences and Doctor of Veterinary Medicine.

Bachelor of Science in Animal Sciences

The Department of Animal Sciences provides training in the biological systems important to animals, including principles and practices associated with the management and well-being of agricultural animal production.  Care and well-being of companion and laboratory animals is also taught. Animal Scientists at WSU are experts in animal nutrition, physiology, reproduction, genetics and genomics, nutrient management, meat and muscle biology, and animal behavior. They bring this expertise to the classroom and to the experiential learning activities offered to our students.   Unique hands-on learning opportunities with animals allow our students to practice and apply what they learn in the classroom. Most departmental faculty are engaged in the many multidisciplinary Centers across the WSU campus which provides additional broadening and experiential opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students.

The undergraduate curriculum prepares graduates for a wide variety of career paths. These paths include animal production and food processing (meats, dairy products, etc.); animal research; biomedical research; wild and zoological animal care; companion animal services; the agricultural service industries (including feed manufacturing and sales, pharmaceuticals, artificial insemination, agricultural equipment, financial institutions, etc.); and government agencies. Graduates of the Animal Sciences program are well prepared to continue their education by pursuing graduate or professional degrees in the sciences and veterinary and human medicine fields. Employers seek out graduates in Animal Sciences for their strong foundation in science, practical and technical knowledge of animal care, and hands-on experience with animal production.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the Bachelor’s Degree in Animal Sciences, it is expected that graduates will be able to:

  • Develop and evaluate animal production and management systems by integrating knowledge of animal genetics, nutrition, reproduction, and other relevant disciplines and applying scientific and quantitative reasoning to solve real-world challenges.
  • Locate, critically evaluate, and apply information from scholarly animal science literature and other sources to expand personal understanding and knowledge of animal sciences, providing a foundation for lifelong learning.
  • Create and interpret graphs, tables and diagrams illustrating scientific data and concepts, and understand basic concepts relating to the design and analysis of research in the animal sciences.
  • Communicate effectively, both orally and in writing, about animal sciences to a range of audiences using appropriate traditional and emerging media.
  • Engage actively and effectively in discussion of complex issues relevant to animal sciences by understanding and appreciating:
    • the importance of animals to the health and well-being of society;
    • economic, environmental, animal welfare, and societal impacts of animal production and management systems at the local and global levels;
    • varied ethical perspectives on animal practices;
    • the role of science in informing debates.
  • Appreciate the breadth and depth of professional opportunities in animal sciences relating to: the keeping of animals for food and fiber production and other purposes (e.g., species conservation, companionship, research and teaching, biotechnology, sports); the application of scientific principles to animal breeding, reproduction, feeding, growth and development, health management, housing, handling, and end–product safety and quality.

Degree Options in Animal Sciences

Students in Animal Sciences take a wide variety of agricultural and non-agricultural courses, receiving in-depth training in the comparative biology of farm and companion animals. Students select a degree option to coincide with their interests. Each option has both required courses and electives, which allow individual program specialization in areas of animal science, technology, and production or pre-veterinary medicine/science. The Animal Science, Technology, and Production curriculum is designed to provide students with the scientific, technological, and practical knowledge, and communication skills to make them productive members of the food production, animal care and related industries. The Pre-veterinary/Science option is designed to provide graduates with the skills to be successful in the biomedical or veterinary sciences, biotechnology or other science related fields.

The Animal Science, Technology, and Production Option emphasizes the business, economic and science-based practical management aspects of animal production and care of animals. This option is recommended for students preparing to work in agricultural animal production, companion animal care, or agribusiness.

The Pre-veterinary/Science Option places emphasis on basic science courses. This option is recommended for students planning to attend graduate school, apply to the professional program leading to the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine or other post-baccalaureate degree, or work in technical or specialized areas of animal science, such as extension, academia, research, technical consulting, or laboratory research.

Many opportunities outside the classroom are available for students to further their educational experiences. Animal Sciences students are strongly encouraged to participate as part-time employees in the livestock centers, or in research and teaching programs within the department. Opportunities are available to students for on-the-job training in professional internships within diverse segments of the agricultural, companion animal, veterinary, biomedical, or research sectors. The department offers experiential learning opportunities with dairy cattle, beef cattle, and swine that allow students to practice decision making and management skills.  Active student clubs within the Department of Animal Sciences, the College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences, and the university community provide students with both professional and social contacts with faculty and other students. Departmental and college scholarships are available based on ability, financial need and interest.

Animal Sciences courses are attractive to students in other majors and from any background. Animal Sciences courses broaden a student’s knowledge of applied and basic biology, agriculture and the environment, and society in general. Many students find that obtaining a minor in Animal Sciences complements and adds depth to other majors.

Transfer Students

Students planning to transfer to the Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, from community colleges or other institutions should complete as many science, mathematics, and University Common Requirements (UCORE) courses as possible prior to transferring. Inquiries about specific courses should be directed to the Undergraduate Academic Coordinator in the department.




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Animal Science, Technology, and Production Option (120 Credits)

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements, which replace the UCORE requirements.

Newly matriculated students may be admitted to the animal sciences major upon making their intention known to the department.

Current students seeking admission to the major must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better and be in good academic standing with the University.

First Year
First TermCredits
ANIM SCI 1013
ANIM SCI 1801
CHEM 101 [PSCI] or 105 [PSCI]4
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
MATH Requirement13 or 4
Second TermCredits
BIOLOGY 106 [BSCI]4
CHEM 102 or 1064
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
H D 205 [COMM] (recommended) or other [COMM] course3 or 4
Second Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
BIOLOGY 107 [BSCI]4
Lab Management Requirement 21
MATH Requirement and /or Electives16
Second TermCredits
ANIM SCI 2403
Diversity [DIVR]3
ECONS 101 [SSCI]3
STAT 212 [QUAN], 412, or PSYCH 311 [QUAN]33 or 4
Electives3
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
ANIM SCI 3134
ANIM SCI 3303
ANIM SCI 3801
ANIM SCI Group 1 Elective42 or 3
Business and Economics Course53
Electives3
Second TermCredits
ANIM SCI 3503
ANIM SCI 3511
ANIM SCI Group 1 Elective 42 or 3
Business and Economics Course53
Humanities [HUM]3
VET CLIN 361, 367, or VET PH 3083 or 4
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
Ag Sciences Elective63
ANIM SCI 464 [CAPS] [M] or 472 [CAPS] [M]73
ANIM SCI Group 2 Electives 86
Electives93
Second TermCredits
ANIM SCI Group 2 Electives 86
Electives911

Footnotes
1MATH requirement may be satisfied by completing MATH 106 and 108, 140 [QUAN], 171 [QUAN], or 202 [QUAN].
2Lab Management Requirement courses (One course) include ANIM SCI 166, 172, 174 (Fall-only), 178, 280 (Spring only).
3Students who have not yet completed a [QUAN] course should select STAT 212 or PSYCH 311.
4ANIM SCI Group 1 Electives (Two courses) include ANIM SCI 205, 260, 266, 267, 274, 285, 314, 345, 346, 360, and other courses as approved by advisor.
5Business and Economics Electives (Two courses) include ACCTG 230; B LAW 210; ECONS 330, 335, 350, 351, 352, 450, and other courses as approved by advisor.
6Ag Sciences Electives: Any level AFS, AGTM, CROP SCI, ENTOM, FS, HORT, and SOIL SCI course. To meet University requirements for upper division coursework, students may need to select a 300-400 level course.
7ANIM SCI 474 [CAPS][M] may be taken as an alternative in Spring semester.
8ANIM SCI Group 2 Electives (Four courses) must include one [M] course. Students may choose any of the following courses that have not been used to fulfill other requirements: ANIM SCI 314, 345, 346, 360, 378, 408 [M], 440 [M], 451 [M], 454, 460, 464 [CAPS] [M], 472 [CAPS] [M], 473 [M], 474 [CAPS] [M], 478 [M], 485 [M], 488 [M], and other courses as approved by advisor.
9Elective courses should include sufficient credits and 300-400-level coursework to meet the University requirement of 120 credits and 40 credits of upper-division coursework.

Animal Sciences - Accelerated Pre-Veterinary Option (127 Credits)

NOTE: Students must complete a minimum of 90 undergraduate credits – including 30 credits of 300-400-level course work - and be accepted into the Veterinary Medicine program to complete this option.

In order to meet the increasing demand for food-animal veterinarians, the Department of Animal Sciences and the College of Veterinary Medicine have created a combined program designed to train selected, highly qualified students to earn both a Bachelor of Science in Animal Sciences and a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) degree within a seven-year program. Students will take a three-year animal science program, completing all UCORE requirements, animal sciences requirements, and pre-veterinary medicine requirements. This program includes mathematics; chemistry, including organic and biochemistry; general biology; physics; and animal sciences courses, including an introduction to livestock; then further education in animal nutrition, breeding and genetics, reproduction, and the economics of animal management. Students will then enter the College of Veterinary Medicine and complete the requirements for total hours and 300-400-level hours before earning the BS in Animal Sciences. Students will continue the curriculum, leading to the DVM degree after a total of seven years of college work.

Qualified students in the Department of Animal Sciences with high scholastic achievement and demonstrated experience and interest in working with livestock will be invited to apply for the accelerated program after the second semester of the first year. Selected students are admitted to the major in the first semester of the sophomore year. Application and acceptance procedures for the DVM program are the same as those for other applicants. Successful participants will complete the three-year animal sciences program and begin the veterinary medicine curriculum in their fourth year of study. If the student is not accepted or withdraws from the DVM program, the student is required to complete additional undergraduate coursework to earn the BS in Animal Sciences.
First Year
First TermCredits
ANIM SCI 1013
ANIM SCI 172, 174, or 1781
ANIM SCI 1801
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
MATH Requirement14
Second TermCredits
BIOLOGY 106 [BSCI]4
CHEM 1064
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
H D 205 [COMM] or Communication [COMM]/[WRTG]3 or 4
MATH Requirement or Electives12 or 3
Second Year
First TermCredits
ANIM SCI Electives23
BIOLOGY 107 4
CHEM 3454
Diversity [DIVR]3
Humanities [HUM]3
Second TermCredits
ANIM SCI 2403
Arts [ARTS]3
ECONS 101 [SSCI]3
MBIOS 3014
STAT 212 [QUAN]4
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
ANIM SCI 3134
ANIM SCI 3303
ANIM SCI 3801
ANIM SCI 440 [M], 464 [CAPS] [M], 472 [CAPS] [M], or 488 [M]33
CHEM 370 or MBIOS 3033 or 4
Second TermCredits
ANIM SCI 3503
ANIM SCI 3511
ANIM SCI 408 [M], 451 [M], 473 [M], 474 [CAPS] [M], or 485 [M]33
ANIM SCI Electives26
PHYSICS 1013
PHYSICS 1111
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
DVM Coursework15
Second TermCredits
DVM Coursework15

Footnotes
1MATH requirement may be satisfied by completing MATH 106 and 108, 140 [QUAN], or 171 [QUAN].
2ANIM SCI Electives (9 credits): Any 300-400-level ANIM SCI course not S, F-graded and not used to fulfill other requirements, or as approved by advisor.
3To fulfill UCORE [CAPS] requirement, must include one of the following courses: ANIM SCI 464 [CAPS], 472 [CAPS], or 474 [CAPS].

Pre-Veterinary Medicine/Science (120 Credits)

Newly matriculated students may be admitted to the animal sciences major upon making their intention known to the department.

Current students seeking admission to the major must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better and be in good academic standing with the University.
First Year
First TermCredits
ANIM SCI 1013
ANIM SCI 1801
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
MATH Requirement13 or 4
Second TermCredits
BIOLOGY 106 [BSCI]4
CHEM 1064
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH Requirement, and/or Electives15
Second Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
BIOLOGY 1074
CHEM 3454
H D 205 [COMM] (recommended) or Communication [COMM]/[WRTG]3 or 4
Lab Management Requirement 21
Second TermCredits
ANIM SCI 2403
CHEM 370 or MBIOS 3033 or 4
Humanities [HUM]3
STAT 212 [QUAN], 412, or PSYCH 311 [QUAN]33 or 4
Electives3
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
ANIM SCI 3134
ANIM SCI 3303
ANIM SCI 3801
MBIOS 3014
200-300-level ANIM SCI Electives42 or 3
Second TermCredits
ANIM SCI 3503
ANIM SCI 3511
Diversity [DIVR]3
ECONS 101 [SSCI]3
PHYSICS 1013
PHYSICS 1111
200-300-level ANIM SCI Electives42 or 3
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ANIM SCI 464 [CAPS] [M] or 472 [CAPS] [M]53
400-level ANIM SCI Electives65 or 6
Electives77
Second TermCredits
BIOLOGY 324, VET CLIN 361, or VET PH 3083 or 4
400-level ANIM SCI Electives [M]63
Electives79

Footnotes
1MATH requirement may be satisfied by completing MATH 106 and 108, 140 [QUAN], or 171 [QUAN].
2Lab Management Requirement courses (One course) include ANIM SCI 166, 172, 174 (Fall-only), 178, 280 (Spring only).
3Students who have not yet completed a [QUAN] course should select STAT 212 or PSYCH 311.
4200-300-level ANIM SCI Electives: Select two courses from: ANIM SCI 205, 260, 266, 267, 274, 285, 314, 345, 346, 360, or as approved by advisor.
5Students may substitute ANIM SCI 474 [CAPS] [M] in the spring.
6400-level ANIM SCI Electives: Select three courses from ANIM SCI 408 [M], 440 [M], 451 [M], 454, 460, 464 [M], 472 [M], 473 [M], 474 [M], 478 [M], 481, 485 [M], or 488 [M] not used to fulfill a major requirement, or as approved by advisor. Students are required to complete two [M] courses to meet University requirements.
7Elective courses should include sufficient credits and 300-400-level coursework to meet the University requirement of 120 credits and 40 credits of upper-division coursework.


Minors

Animal Sciences

Students may apply for a minor in Animal Sciences once they have been admitted to a major and completed 60 credits. A minor in Animal Sciences requires a minimum of 16 credits of courses with the ANIM SCI prefix. At least 9 of the 16 credits must be upper-division, taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses, and include a minimum of 7 credits from the following list: ANIM SCI 313, 330, 350, and/or 351. In addition, students may use up to 4 credits of ANIM SCI 399 or 499. Students must maintain a minimum 2.0 GPA within ANIM SCI courses to retain the Animal Science minor. 



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Animal Sciences (ANIM_SCI)

Fall 2022 Spring 2023 Summer 2023 


101 Introductory Animal Science 3 (2-3) Types and breeds of livestock, terminology, methods, management systems, techniques of animal and poultry production and consumer impact. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

166 Horse Handling 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 101. Effective horse handling skills and techniques; safety for both horse and human will be emphasized and prioritized throughout the course. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

166 (Effective through Summer 2022) Young Horse Handling 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 101. Effective horse handling skills and techniques; safety for both horse and human will be emphasized and prioritized throughout the course. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

172 Dairy Cattle Management Laboratory 1 (0-3) Management practices associated with a dairy enterprise. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

174 Beef Cow Calf Management Laboratory 1 (0-3) Management practices associated with a beef cow calf enterprise for students without experience. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

178 Swine Management Laboratory 1 (0-3) Management practices associated with a swine enterprise. Field trip and special clothing required. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

180 Animal Sciences Orientation 1 Animal sciences as a profession; career opportunities, curriculum, advisement, internships, externships, animal centers, special services centers, and course requirements. Typically offered Fall.

205 [BSCI] Companion Animal Nutrition 3 Biological concepts with application in nutrition of pet animals, including evolution and selection of pet species and their nutrient requirements. Typically offered Spring.

240 Introduction to Domestic Animal Anatomy and Physiology 3 Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 101; BIOLOGY 106. Fundamental knowledge, terminology and basic principles of domestic animal anatomy and physiology for future advanced courses. The major organ systems (e.g. muscle, skeletal, neural, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal) are covered with emphasis on comparative anatomy, integrated function, and homeostatic control mechanisms. Typically offered Spring.

260 Live Animal and Carcass Evaluation 3 (1-6) Basic principles of live animal and carcass evaluation. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

266 Equine Management 2 Foundational learning of best practices in equine management. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

267 Equine Science 2 Fundamental Scientific principles of equine anatomy and physiology including nutrition, reproduction, and muscle biology. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

274 Beef Feedlot Systems 2 Overview of feeding management, feed milling and batching, animal health, and economics of the commercial cattle feeding business. One 1-day field trip. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

280 Animal Science and Society: Current Topics 1 A discussion of the products, science, and management of animal agriculture and how they relate to, and impact, society. Typically offered Spring.

285 Rights and Welfare of Animals 3 Ethical considerations and welfare of animals used as companions, for food, and in scientific research. Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 102 or 106 or concurrent enrollment. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

313 Feeds and Feeding 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106; MATH 106, 108, 140, 171, 172, 182, or 202. Utilization, practices, requirements, nutritive characteristics, and calculations of rations for animals. Field trip required. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

313 (Effective through Summer 2022) Feeds and Feeding 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106; MATH 106, 107, 140, 171, 172, 182, or 202. Utilization, practices, requirements, nutritive characteristics, and calculations of rations for animals. Field trip required. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

314 Principles of Nutrition 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 107; CHEM 102 or 106. Digestion, absorption, metabolism, and function of nutrients. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

315 Captive Exotic Animal Nutrition, Husbandry and Management 3 Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 205, ANIM SCI 314, or SOE 431. Nutrition, husbandry, and management of captive exotic animals emphasizing the requirements of the animal environment.

330 Animal Genetics 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 107; STAT 212. Basic genetic concepts and methods for the genetic improvement of Mendelian and polygenic traits in animals. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

345 Animal Growth and Development 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106; BIOLOGY 107; junior standing. Animal structure, composition, whole body and cellular growth, prenatal and postnatal growth; emphasis on skeletal muscle, bone and adipose tissue. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

345 (Effective through Fall 2022) Introduction to Animal Growth and Development 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106; BIOLOGY 107; junior standing. Animal structure, composition, whole body and cellular growth, prenatal and postnatal growth; emphasis on skeletal muscle, bone and adipose tissue. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

346 Introduction to Skeletal Muscle Physiology 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106. Structure, function and regulation of skeletal muscle; embryonic, neonatal, postnatal growth/atrophy; muscle-specific proteins. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

350 Physiology of Reproduction 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106; BIOLOGY 107; CHEM 102 or 106. Anatomy and physiology of reproductive organs; hormones of reproduction; production of gametes; artificial insemination; fertilization; prenatal development; fertility and infertility. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

351 Physiology of Reproduction Laboratory 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 350 or concurrent enrollment. Laboratory and field techniques used in animal reproduction involving hormones, artificial insemination, semen evaluation and pregnancy. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

360 Meat Science 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 107. Anatomy, slaughter, classification, and processing of meat animal species. Special clothing and equipment required. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

378 Advanced Livestock and Meat Selection and Evaluation 2 (0-6) May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 260. Principles and practices of livestock and meat selection and evaluation. Off-campus and weekend participation required.

380 Careers in Animal Science 1 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Animal Sciences; junior standing. Issues and preparation for careers in animal sciences areas.

398 Cooperative Education Externship V 2 (0-6) to 8 (0-24) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 credits. Cooperative education externship in livestock production or related field. Typically offered Summer Session. S, F grading.

399 Practicum V 1-8 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 credits. Directed internship in livestock production and related fields conducted at WSU centers on or off campus. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

405 Ciders and Other Fermented Foods 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106 and 107, or MBIOS 101, or MBIOS 304 and 305. Chemistry, microbiology, and technology associated with the production of cider, beer, and other food fermentations. Recommended preparation: FS 304 and 465. (Crosslisted course offered as FS 405, ANIM SCI 405). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

405 (Effective through Fall 2022) Ciders and Other Fermented Foods 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106 and 107, or MBIOS 101, or MBIOS 304 and 305. Chemistry, microbiology, and technology associated with the production of cider, beer, and other food fermentations. Two half-day field trips required. (Crosslisted course offered as FS 405, ANIM SCI 405). Recommended preparation: FS 304 and 465. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

408 [M] Ruminant Nutrition 3 Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313. Anatomy, physiology, and metabolism in ruminant animals. Typically offered Spring.

440 [M] Physiology of Domestic Animals 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106; BIOLOGY 107. Basic animal functions; relationship and difference between domestic animals; measurement of functional processes. Typically offered Fall.

451 [M] Endocrine Physiology 3 Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106; BIOLOGY 107; one of the following: ANIM SCI 440, BIOLOGY 352, MBIOS 303, or MBIOS 401. Anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry of endocrine systems and hormone action; emphasis on comparative, veterinary, and biomedical models. Credit not granted for both ANIM SCI 451 and ANIM SCI 551. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

453 Biomedical Science and Human/Animal Health: Underlying Science, Diagnosis, and Therapies of Diseases 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 330 or MBIOS 301; ANIM SCI 345 or 350 or BIOLOGY 475; MBIOS 303 or 401 or 404. Biomedical aspects of health outcomes; mechanisms and fundamental principles of diagnostic techniques and professional skills. Typically offered Fall.

454 Artificial Insemination and Pregnancy Detection 2 (1-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 351. Techniques in semen handling, insemination and pregnancy detection in cattle. Special clothing required. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

460 Advanced Meat Science 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 102 or 106; junior standing. Structure and development of skeletal muscle, postmortem biological changes, meat quality, meat processing, food safety, and meat industry. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

464 [CAPS] [M] Companion Animal Management 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350; junior standing. Care and management of companion animal species throughout the life cycle, including nutrition, reproduction, exercise and behavior. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

464 (Effective through Summer 2022) [CAPS] [M] Companion Animal Management 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350. Care and management of companion animal species throughout the life cycle, including nutrition, reproduction, exercise and behavior. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

466 [CAPS] [M] Advanced Equine Systems 3 Course prerequisite: ANIM SCI 266 or ANIM SCI 267; ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350; ANIM SCI 351. Integrating Animal Sciences disciplines with real-world issues involving horse businesses. Typically offered Spring.

468 [M] Applied Physiology of Cultured Fish 3 Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350. Development and management of finfish aquaculture systems and production strategies. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

468 (Effective through Summer 2022) Applied Physiology of Cultured Fish 3 Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350. Development and management of finfish aquaculture systems and production strategies. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

472 [CAPS] [M] Dairy Cattle Management 3 Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350; junior standing. Principles of breeding, feeding, and management of dairy cattle. Field trip required. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

473 [M] Advanced Dairy Management 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 472. Current dairy record keeping and database management systems. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

474 [CAPS] [M] Beef Cattle Production 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350; junior standing. Breeding, feeding, and management; commercial and purebred enterprises; management of beef cattle on ranges, pastures and in the feedlot. Field trip required. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

474 (Effective through Summer 2022) [CAPS] [M] Beef Cattle Production 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350. Breeding, feeding, and management; commercial and purebred enterprises; management of beef cattle on ranges, pastures and in the feedlot. Field trip required. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

478 [M] Swine Production 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350. Principles of breeding, feeding, management, and marketing of swine. Field trips and special clothing required. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

478 (Effective through Summer 2022) [M] Swine Production 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ANIM SCI 313; ANIM SCI 330; ANIM SCI 350. Principles of breeding, feeding, management, and marketing of swine. Field trips and special clothing required. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-15 May be repeated for credit. S, F grading.

481 Special Topics in Study Abroad: Animal Production Systems in the World V 2-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Immersive course integrating experiential learning activities in animal production systems into international locations where ANIM SCI Faculty are already working and conducting research. Typically offered Summer Session.

485 [M] Applied Animal Behavior 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 106; BIOLOGY 107; STAT 212; junior standing. Application of scientific principles governing animal behavior to practical aspects of animal housing, breeding, handling, training, and care. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

488 [M] Perspectives in Biotechnology 3 Course Prerequisite: MBIOS 301 or ANIM SCI 330. Theory and application of biotechnology in agriculture, industry, and medicine; methodological, environmental, social, and economic concerns. Credit not granted for both ANIM SCI 488 and ANIM SCI 588. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

495 Research in Animal Sciences V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 credits. Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Planned and supervised undergraduate research experience.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

500 Seminar in Animal Sciences 1 May be repeated for credit. Current developments in animal sciences. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

501 Milk, Meat, and Methane: Contemporary Animal Production Issues 3 Provides knowledge and understanding of livestock issues that affect contemporary livestock production.

504 Special Topics V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 credits. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

507 Advanced Nutrient Metabolism 3 Advanced topics in metabolic regulation of carbohydrate, fat and amino acid use by animals.

510 Digestion and Nutrient Utilization in Animals 3 (2-3) Gastrointestinal physiology, rate of passage, feed intake regulation, measures of digestibility, starch, fat and nonstarch polysaccharide, and digestion and utilization of nutrients.

513 Mineral and Vitamin Metabolism 4 Absorption, excretion, metabolism, dietary requirements and interactions of minerals and vitamins in animals and humans. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

520 Preparation of Scientific Literature in Animal Sciences 2 Preparation of grant proposals, manuscripts, and literature reviews on research topics. Typically offered Spring.

528 Topics in Animal Breeding 2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 credits. Systems of selection and mating for genetic improvement in farm animals.

545 Statistical Genomics 3 (2-3) Develop concepts and analytical skills for modern breeding by using Genome-Wide Association Study and genomic prediction in framework of mixed linear models and Bayesian approaches. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 545, ANIM SCI 545, BIOLOGY 545, HORT 545, PL P 545.) Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 474; MBIOS 478. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

551 [M] Endocrine Physiology 3 Anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry of endocrine systems and hormone action; emphasis on comparative, veterinary, and biomedical models. Credit not granted for both ANIM SCI 451 and ANIM SCI 551. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

558 Molecular and Cellular Reproduction 3 (2-2) State of the art concepts of the molecular, cellular, and physiological aspects of mammalian reproduction. (Crosslisted course offered as MBIOS 528, ANIM SCI 558). Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

581 Stem Cell Biology, Therapeutics and Regenerative Medicine 3 Provides information on the latest cutting edge research in the areas of stem cell biology and tissue regeneration; covers stem cell therapeutics, gene transfer vectors and methods for isolating, characterizing, and generating stem cells. (Course offered as PHARMSCI 581, ANIM SCI 581). Typically offered Spring.

582 Seminar in Reproductive Biology 1 Current developments in reproductive biology. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

588 [M] Perspectives in Biotechnology 3 Theory and application of biotechnology in agriculture, industry, and medicine; methodological, environmental, social, and economic concerns. Credit not granted for both ANIM SCI 488 and ANIM SCI 588. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

598 Advanced Topics in Animal Sciences V 1-2 May be repeated for credit. Recent research in various disciplines of animal sciences. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Animal Sciences PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

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