The Washington State University Pullman Catalog

School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering

mme.wsu.edu
Sloan 201
509-335-8654

Director and Professor, J. S. McCloy; Professors, A. Bandyopadhyay, S. Bose, J. L. Ding, P. Dutta, D. P. Field, Q. Li, Y. Lin, K. Matveev, S. Mesarovic, M. G. Norton, C. Pezeshki, L. V. Smith, J. Zhang, W. Zhong; Associate Professors, S. Banerjee, S. P. Beckman, K. R. Chen, B. A. Gozen, J. W. Leachman, J. Liu, D. F. McLarty, N. Perez-Arancibia, M. K. Song, J. P. Swensen; Assistant Professors, N. Boddeti, M. Hosseinzadeh, M. Luo, K. Qiu; Teaching Associate Professor, N. Biswas; Teaching Assistant Professors, E. Larsen, J. Steffens; Research Professors, A. Du, N. Smith; Bremerton: Scholarly Associate Professors, B. Asgharian, A. Rathnayake; Lecturer, P. M. Dodge; Everett: Scholarly Professor, X. Bi; Scholarly Associate Professor, G. N. Taub; Scholarly Assistant Professor, Y. Hu; Lecturer, D. Strong; Tri Cities: Associate Professor, C. Mo; Teaching Associate Professor, M. Saad.

The School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering offers programs in Mechanical Engineering (Pullman, Bremerton, and Everett campuses), and Materials Science and Engineering (Pullman). Each program is detailed as follows.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Mechanical engineering is concerned with (a) the use and economical conversion of energy from natural sources into other useful energy to provide power, light, heat, cooling and transportation, (b) the design and production of machines to lighten the burden of human work, (c) the creative planning, development and operation of systems for using energy, machines and resources, (d) the processing of materials into products useful to people, and (e) developing machines and algorithms for autonomous systems.  Employment opportunities for graduates exist in the areas of mechanical design, systems design, equipment development, manufacturing, CAD/CAM, algorithm development, project engineering, production management, applied research, and sales and service.

The program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

The mission of the mechanical engineering program is to provide a broad education in mechanical engineering that prepares our students for being successful in professional practice and advanced studies. The educational objectives of the undergraduate mechanical engineering program are as follows: (1) Graduates will meet or exceed the expectations of employers of mechanical engineers; (2) Qualified graduates will pursue advanced study if they so desire; and (3) Graduates will pursue leadership positions in their profession and/or communities.

The undergraduate curriculum emphasizes foundation courses at the third year which are fundamental to all aspects of mechanical engineering. These courses emphasize both analysis and design while accompanying laboratory courses provide opportunities for hands-on experiences. Computer applications are interwoven throughout the program. The courses in the fourth year emphasize the integration of fundamental engineering principles into various applications in mechanical engineering. Students have an opportunity to complete a sequence of electives in one of three concentrations or follow a general path taking technical electives of their choice. The concentrations include Thermo-fluids, Manufacturing, and Autonomous Systems. By completing a concentration, students will have deeper knowledge in a specific area of mechanical engineering they would like to pursue in their future careers. The undergraduate program culminates in a capstone laboratory course.

Graduates are prepared to enter the field as engineers or to continue into a graduate program. An engineering internship program is available for students to gain industrial experience during their academic careers.

Student Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes of the mechanical engineering undergraduate program are the following:

  • Ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.
  • Ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.
  • Ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors.
  • Ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives.
  • Ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
  • Ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  • Ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

The School offers courses of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering (accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org), Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy (Mechanical Engineering). The school participates in the interdisciplinary programs leading to the Master of Science in Engineering and Doctor of Philosophy (Engineering Science).

 MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

The program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Materials Science and Engineering is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.

The mission of the materials science and engineering program is to provide excellence in education, research, and service in the field of Materials Science and Engineering through educational programs that graduate students with strong backgrounds in scientific and engineering problem-solving methods. Materials science and engineering is the application of methods and principles of the pure sciences to study engineering materials. The undergraduate program focuses on (a) the relationship of the microscopic structure, e.g. crystal structure and defects to the macroscopic properties of materials, e.g. strength; (b) experimental techniques for characterizing physical, chemical and structural properties of materials;  (c) Design and selection of appropriate materials for given engineering applications.

The specific fields of application covered by research and instruction programs can be expressed by the nominal designations of metals (metallurgy), polymers, ceramics, electronic materials, biomaterials, and composites. Due to the diversity of useful properties encountered in materials engineering, attention must be given to application and peculiarities of these specific types of materials. Where possible, however, a generalized approach toward the study of materials, their properties, their selection, and their utilization is fostered. The broad-based instructional approach prepares graduates for careers in a wide range of industrial settings, from aerospace companies to corporations specializing in the production of solid state electronics. In addition, the undergraduate curriculum prepares students for continued education at the graduate level.

The educational objectives of the undergraduate materials science and engineering program are as follows: (1) Graduates will meet or exceed the expectations of employers of materials engineers; (2) Qualified graduates will pursue advanced study if they so desire; and (3) Graduates will pursue leadership positions in their profession and/or communities.

The School offers courses of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and Engineering (accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org) and the Master of Science in Materials Science and Engineering. The school participates in the interdisciplinary programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Engineering Science, Materials Science and Engineering).

Student Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes of the materials science and engineering undergraduate program are the following:

  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.
  • An ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors.
  • An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  • An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
  • An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives.
  • An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.
  • An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.
  • Ability to apply advanced science (such as chemistry and physics) and engineering principles to materials systems.
  • Integrated understanding of the scientific and engineering principles underlying the above for major elements of the field, viz. structure, properties, processing and performance related to materials systems appropriate to the field.
  • Ability to apply and integrate knowledge from each of the above four elements of the field to solve materials selection and design problems.
  • Ability to utilize experimental, statistical, and computational methods consistent with the goals of the program.

ADMISSION

Admission to the Mechanical Engineering program or Materials Science and Engineering program is processed by the School. The admission requirements, including requirements for transfer students, are described in the WSU catalog in the schedules of studies for each major. Details for admission can also be obtained by contacting the School directly.

TRANSFER STUDENTS

The School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering cooperates with the community colleges in Washington to minimize problems associated with transfer. Inquiries are welcome. A strong preparation in mathematics, physics, and chemistry is strongly recommended prior to transfer to minimize the time required at Washington State University to complete the bachelor’s degree requirements.

GRADUATE STUDY

Applicants should have a Bachelor of Science degree from an accredited program in mechanical engineering or materials science and engineering. Students with bachelor degrees in other engineering disciplines, mathematics, and the physical sciences are routinely admitted but may be required to meet additional course requirements.

 




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Materials Science and Engineering (123 Credits)

Admission Requirements

To be admitted into the Materials Science Engineering major, students must have scored 83% or higher on the ALEKS math placement exam, or received a score of 2 or higher on an AP Calculus exam, or completed MATH 106 and 108 with a C or better, or completed MATH 171 or a higher-level calculus course with a C or better.

Transferring students must satisfy all of the above admission requirements. Students must earn a 2.6 GPA in transferred major courses and have earned a “C” or better in all transferred courses required for the MSE degree.

Benchmarks to Maintain Major in MSE Status

To keep their status as Materials Science Engineering majors, students must: (1) maintain 2.6 average GPA in major courses required for MSE degree, (2) obtain grade “C” of better in all courses required for MSE degree. No more than one repeat per course is allowed in all ME and MSE courses required for MSE degree.

Major courses required for MSE degree include all engineering and computer science courses, in addition to ME, MSE, physics, chemistry, and math courses listed in the schedule of studies.

Graduation Requirement

Receive a letter grade of C or better in all major courses.

Any further questions should be addressed to the Undergraduate Student Services office located in Sloan 205 or contact an MME academic advisor.
First Year
First TermCredits
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
ME 1162
MSE 2013
Second TermCredits
CHEM 1064
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
MATH 1724
MSE 2023
Technical Elective13
Second Year
First TermCredits
MATH 2202
MATH 273 2
ME 2201
MSE 3163
PHYSICS 2013
PHYSICS 211 1
UCORE Inquiry23
Second TermCredits
MATH 3153
MSE 2413
MSE 331, 332, or 33333
PHYSICS 2023
PHYSICS 2121
UCORE Inquiry23
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 102 [SSCI]3
MSE 3023
MSE 3213
MSE 3232
MSE 4133
STAT 3703
Second TermCredits
MSE 3183
MSE 320 [M]3
MSE 331, 332, or 33333
UCORE Inquiry23
Technical Elective13
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ENGLISH 402 [WRTG] [M]3
ME 3123
ME 416 [CAPS]3
MSE Electives46
Second TermCredits
MSE 425; or MSE 488 and ENGR 4893
MSE Elective43
Technical Elective13
UCORE Inquiry23
Complete Exit Survey

Footnotes
1Technical Elective (Minimum of 9 credits, of which 3 must be upper-division or 500 level): Any upper-division CE, CH E, CHEM, CPT S, E E, MATH, ME, MSE, or PHYSICS course not used to fulfill other requirements (excluding ME 416), CE 211, and 215, EE 261, and 262, ME 212 and 216.
2Must complete 4 of these 5 UCORE designations: ARTS, BSCI, DIVR, EQJS, HUM.
3Choose two courses from MSE 331, 332, or 333.
4MSE Elective (9 credits): Any 300, 400, or 500-level MSE course except MSE 499 not used to fulfill other requirements.

Mechanical Engineering (124 Credits)

Admission Requirements

To be admitted into the Mechanical Engineering major, students must have scored 83% or higher on the ALEKS math placement exam, or received a score of 2 or higher on an AP Calculus exam, or completed MATH 106 and 108 with a C or better, or completed MATH 171 or a higher-level calculus course with a C or better.

Transferring students must satisfy all of the above admission requirements. Students must earn a 2.6 GPA in transferred major courses and have earned a “C” or better in all transferred courses required for the ME degree.

Students transferring to degree-completion programs in Bremerton and Everett branches must have 2.6 average GPA in the following or equivalent courses, each completed with grade “C” or better: CE 211, CE 215, CHEM 105, CPT S 121 or 131, E E 221, ENGLISH 101, MATH 171, MATH 172, MATH 220, MATH 273, MATH 315, ME 116, ME 212, ME 241, PHYSICS 201 and 211, PHYSICS 202 and 212.

Benchmarks to Maintain Major in ME Status
To keep their status as Mechanical Engineering majors, students must: (1) maintain a 2.6 average GPA in major courses required for ME degree, (2) obtain a grade of C of better in all courses required for the ME degree. No more than one repeat per course is allowed in all ME and MSE courses required for the ME degree.
Major courses required for the ME degree include all engineering and computer science courses, in addition to ME, MSE, physics, chemistry, and math courses listed in the schedule of studies.

Graduation Requirement
Receive a letter grade of C or better in all major courses.

Concentrations for BS in Mechanical Engineering
Students follow a General Path, or seek a concentration in Thermo-fluids, Manufacturing, or Autonomous Systems.

Students are encouraged to consult with their advisor at their campus of residence for approved alternative course sequences as well as allowed substitutions to the schedule studies.
First Year
First TermCredits
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
ENGR 1202
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
UCORE Inquiry13
Second TermCredits
ECONS 102 [SSCI]3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 1724
ME 1162
UCORE Inquiry13
Second Year
First TermCredits
CE 2113
CPT S 121, 131, or ME 2413 or 4
MATH 2202
MATH 273 2
PHYSICS 2013
PHYSICS 2111
STAT 3703
Second TermCredits
CE 2153
MATH 3153
ME 2123
ME 2162
ME 2201
PHYSICS 2023
PHYSICS 2121
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
E E 261 3
E E 262 1
ME 3013
ME 3033
ME 3133
MSE 2013
Second TermCredits
ENGLISH 402 [WRTG] 3
ME 3043
ME 3062
ME 3163
ME 3483
Restricted Elective23
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ME 415 [M]3
UCORE Inquiry13
Concentration Courses3,46
Restricted Elective23
Second TermCredits
ME 406 [M]3
ME 416 [CAPS]3
UCORE Inquiry13
Concentration Course3,43
Complete Exit Survey
Complete Fundamentals of Engineering Exam

Footnotes
1Must complete 4 of these 5 UCORE designations: ARTS, BSCI, DIVR, EQJS, HUM.
2Restricted Electives (at least 6 credits): Choose from ME 310 and 311 or ME 312, ME 401, ME 405.
3Concentration Paths (9 credits): General Concentration: Three technical electives which may include the remaining restricted elective. Thermo Fluids Concentration: Must take ME 405, and either ME 312 or 401 from the restrictive electives; two courses from ME 419, 431, 436, and 439; and one additional technical elective. Manufacturing Concentration: Must take ME 312, and either ME 401 or 405 from the restrictive electives; ME 474 and 475; and one more technical elective. Autonomous Systems Concentration (must complete CPT S 121, 131, or ME 241 prior to beginning this concentration): Must take ME 401, and either ME 312 or 405 from the restrictive electives; two courses from CPT S 122 or 132, and ME 481; and one technical elective.
4Technical Electives for concentrations: Any 400-500-level ME, MSE, E E, or CPT S course not listed as a major requirement, MSE 318, 331, 332, and 333, and BIO ENGR 425. Additionally, a combined maximum of 3 credits total from ME 488 and ENGR 489 as part of an internship or practicum may be earned towards a Technical Elective.


Minors

Materials Science and Engineering

A minor in materials science and engineering requires 16 credits which must include ME 220 and MSE 201. An additional 12 credits must be chosen from MSE 302, 316, 318, 321, 331, 332, 333, 404, 406, 413, ME 310, 311, 312, or E E 496.  9 hours of upper-division work must be taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.


Mechanical Engineering

A minor in mechanical engineering requires 16 credits of 300-400-level ME courses, including two of the following four courses: ME 303, 304, 316, 348.  9 hours of upper-division work must be taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Materials Science And Engineering (MSE)

Spring 2024 Summer 2024 Fall 2024 


201 Materials Engineering Fundamentals 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 105 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Introduction to the fundamental concepts of materials engineering. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

202 Materials Science Fundamentals 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 106 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; MSE 201 with a C or better. Introduction to the fundamental concepts of materials science. Typically offered Spring.

241 Engineering Computations 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 273 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; 4 credits of PHYSICS 201 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment, or PHYSICS 201 and 211 both with a C or better, or both with concurrent enrollment. Introduction to the computational methods used for solving numerical problems in engineering. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 241, MSE 241.) Typically offered Fall and Spring.

302 Electronic Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: CHEM 105 with a C or better; 4 credits of PHYSICS 202 with a C or better, or PHYSICS 202 and 212 both with a C or better or concurrent enrollment, or PHYSICS 206 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Structure of materials, electronic structure of solids; thermal, electrical, dielectric, and magnetic properties of materials; semiconductors processing. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

316 Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: MSE 202 with a C or better. Laws of thermodynamics, solution thermodynamics, free energy composition diagrams, mechanisms and kinetics of diffusion; solidification behavior, interfaces and phase boundaries, phase transformations in solids, oxidation, and corrosion. Typically offered Fall.

318 Materials Design 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 102; MSE 201 with a C or better; MSE 241 with a C or better; STAT 370 with a C or better. Materials selection and processing design routes to develop new materials for engineering applications. Typically offered Spring.

320 [M] Materials Structure - Properties Lab 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: MSE 201 with a C or better; MSE 202 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Principles and techniques of optical metallography and other laboratory methods used in modern materials science and engineering. Typically offered Fall.

321 Materials Characterization 3 Course Prerequisite: MSE 201 with a C or better. Properties of x-rays, scattering and diffraction; crystal structures; x-ray diffraction methods, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Typically offered Spring.

323 [M] Materials Characterization Lab 2 (1-3) Course Prerequisite: MSE 321 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Laboratory exercises on materials characterization: x-ray, TEM, SEM. Typically offered Spring.

331 Metallic Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: MSE 201 with a C or better. Major alloy systems and manufacturing processes; materials selection. Typically offered Spring.

332 Polymeric Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: MSE 201 with a C or better. Structural characterization, syntheses, and reactions of polymeric materials; relationships between structure and properties, viscoelasticity, deformation, and physical behavior of polymers. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

333 Ceramic Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: MSE 201 with a C or better. Processing, characteristics, microstructure, and properties of ceramic materials. Typically offered Spring.

404 Engineering Composites 3 Course Prerequisite: MSE 201 with a C or better. Basic concept in design and specifications of engineering composites. Typically offered Spring.

406 Biomaterials 3 Course Prerequisite: MSE 201 with a C or better. Overview of the different types of materials used in biomedical applications such as implants and medical devices. Credit not granted for both MSE 406 and MSE 506. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

406 (Effective through Summer 2024) Biomaterials 3 Course Prerequisite: MSE 201 with a C or better. Overview of the different types of materials used in biomedical applications such as implants and medical devices. Credit not granted for both MSE 406 and MSE 506. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 506 and MATSE 506.) Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

413 Mechanical Behavior of Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: CE 215 and MSE 201, both with a C or better; OR MSE 202 with a C or better. Elasticity, elastic stress distributions; plastic deformation of single and polycrystals; introduction to dislocation theory and its applications; creep, fracture, fatigue. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 413, ME 413). Typically offered Fall.

425 [M] Senior Thesis I 3 (0-9) Course Prerequisite: MSE 320 with a C or better; MSE 323 with a C or better; admitted to MSE; senior standing, OR MSE 318 with a C or better; MSE 323 with a C or better; two from MSE 331, 332, or 333 with a C or better; admitted to MSE; senior standing. Research in materials science and engineering. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

483 Topics in Materials Engineering V 1 (0-4) to 4 (0-16) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 7 credits. Contemporary topics in materials engineering.

488 Professional Practice Coop/Internship I V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; integration of coursework with on-the-job professional experience. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 488, BIO ENG 488, CHE 488, CE 488, CPT S 488, E E 488, ME 488, MSE 488, SDC 488). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

488 (Effective through Spring 2024) Professional Practice Coop/Internship I V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; integration of coursework with on-the-job professional experience. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 488, BIO ENG 488, CHE 488, CE 488, CPT S 488, E E 488, ME 488, MSE 488, SDC 488). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

503 Advanced Topics in Materials Engineering V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

504 Electrochemical Energy Systems 3 Principles of electrochemical systems and applications in energy storage/conversion devices. Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge of chemistry, physics, and materials. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

505 Advanced Materials Science 3 Broad baseline in materials science including relationships between structure and properties. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

505 (Effective through Summer 2024) Advanced Materials Science 3 Broad baseline in materials science including relationships between structure and properties. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 505, MATSE 505). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

506 Biomaterials 3 Overview of the different types of materials used in biomedical applications such as implants and medical devices. Credit not granted for both MSE 406 and MSE 506. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

506 (Effective through Summer 2024) Biomaterials 3 Overview of the different types of materials used in biomedical applications such as implants and medical devices. Credit not granted for both MSE 406 and MSE 506. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 506 and MATSE 506.) Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

507 Additive Manufacturing 3 Additive manufacturing processes and their applications in ceramic, metallic, polymeric, and composite materials. Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge in materials science and manufacturing. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 507, ME 507). Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

508 Polymer Nanocomposites and Functionalities 3 Structures, properties, fabrication and applications of nano-scale material and their polymer nanocomposites; functionalities including flame retardant, electrically, thermal and damping properties. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

509 MEMS Engineering 3 (2-3) Introduction to the design, fabrication and application of microelectromechanical systems. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 509, MSE 509). Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

513 Theory of Plasticity and its Physical Foundations 3 Phenomenological plasticity and viscoplasticity of polycrystalline metals and alloys, polymers and granular media; deformation mechanisms; dislocation mechanics and interactions; dislocation motion; slip and climb; crystal plasticity; size effects and gradient models. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 513, ME 513). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

513 (Effective through Summer 2024) Theory of Plasticity and its Physical Foundations 3 Phenomenological plasticity and viscoplasticity of polycrystalline metals and alloys, polymers and granular media; deformation mechanisms; dislocation mechanics and interactions; dislocation motion; slip and climb; crystal plasticity; size effects and gradient models. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 513, ME 513, MATSE 513). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

514 Thermodynamics of Solids 3 Thermodynamic properties of solid solutions; models for substitutional and interstitial solutions; configurational and non-configurational contributions; calculation of phase diagrams. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 514, ME 514). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

515 Electronic Properties of Materials 3 Electron energy bands in solids, electrical conduction in metals and semiconductors, applications to semi-conduction devices based on silicon and III-V compounds. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

516 Phase Transformations 3 Thermodynamics, nucleation, interface motion, mechanisms and kinetics of chemical reactions between solid metals and their environment. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

516 (Effective through Summer 2024) Phase Transformations 3 Thermodynamics, nucleation, interface motion, mechanisms and kinetics of chemical reactions between solid metals and their environment. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 516, MATSE 516). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

517 Thin Films 3 Materials science aspect of thin films, including growth, characterization, and properties for electrical, mechanical, corrosion, and optical behavior. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 517, ME 517). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

520 Multiscale Modeling in Thermomechanics of Materials 3 Multiscale problems in thermomechanics of materials; practical and computational aspects of homogenization, granular materials, dislocation plasticity and atomistic methods. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 520, MSE 520). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

521 Statistics of Microstructures 3 Stereology, orientation and spatial distributions, percolation, measurement techniques and application to modeling of microstructures. Recommended preparation: MATH 540. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

521 (Effective through Summer 2024) Statistics of Microstructures 3 Stereology, orientation and spatial distributions, percolation, measurement techniques and application to modeling of microstructures. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 521, MATSE 521). Recommended preparation: MATH 540. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

523 Ceramics Processing 3 Fundamentals of ceramic processing science for thin films and bulk ceramics. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

524 Glass Science and Technology 3 Glass composition design, processing, and properties; engineering and technology related to glasses and glass-ceramics; case studies in applied glass science and characterization. Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge in materials science and manufacturing.

524 (Effective through Summer 2024) Glass Science and Technology 3 Glass composition design, processing, and properties; engineering and technology related to glasses and glass-ceramics; case studies in applied glass science and characterization. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 524, MATSE 524.) Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge in materials science and manufacturing.

530 Elasticity 3 Theory of kinematics of solid deformable bodies; conservation laws applied to an elastic continuum; generalized linear stress-strain behavior with applications. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 530, MSE 530). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

531 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 3 Overview of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their biomedical, energy, and environmental applications; structures, properties, synthesis of nanoscale materials and fabrication of nanostructured devices. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 531, ME 531.) Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge of materials, engineering, chemistry. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

531 (Effective through Summer 2024) Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 3 Overview of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their biomedical, energy, and environmental applications; structures, properties, synthesis of nanoscale materials and fabrication of nanostructured devices. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 531, MATSE 531, ME 531.) Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge of materials, engineering, chemistry. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

534 Mechanics of Composite Materials 3 Analysis of micromechanical and macromechanical behavior of composite materials with emphasis on fiber-reinforced composite; prediction of properties; stiffness and strength theories; laminated beams and plates; dynamic behavior; environmental effects. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 534, MSE 534). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

537 Fracture Mechanics and Mechanisms 3 Fracture mechanics and mechanisms and the microstructural origins of toughness in metals, polymers and composites. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 537, ME 537). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

538 Special Topics V 1-3 May be repeated for credit. Selected topics of current interest in advanced materials science.

543 Polymer Materials and Engineering 3 Preparation and structure-property relationship of polymer materials with emphasis on fracture mechanics and toughening. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 543, CE 593). Required preparation must include MSE 402. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

544 Natural Fibers 3 Structural aspects and properties of natural fibers including anatomy, ultrastructure, and chemistry. (Crosslisted course offered as CE 594, MSE 544). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

545 Polymer and Composite Processing 3 Polymer and composite processing from fundamental principles to practical applications. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 545, CE 595). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

546 Engineered Wood Composites 3 Theory and practice of wood composite materials, manufacture and development. (Crosslisted course offered as CE 596, MSE 546). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

547 Polymers and Surfaces for Adhesion 3 Physical chemistry of polymers and surfaces needed to understand interface morphology, adhesion mechanisms and bond performance. (Crosslisted course offered as CE 597, MSE 547). Required preparation must include MSE 402 or 404. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

548 Natural Fiber Polymer Composites 3 Fundamentals, development and application of composite materials produced from polymers reinforced with natural fibers and wood as major components. (Crosslisted course offered as CE 598, MSE 548). Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

571 Microscopic Analysis of Solid Surfaces 3 Modern spectroscopic methods for microscopic analysis of solid surfaces; emphasizes electron, ion, laser, and x-ray techniques. Typically offered Spring.

592 Transmission Electron Microscopy 3 Development of the principles and applications of electron optics in microscopy. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

593 Seminar in Materials Science 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Presentation and discussion of topics in materials science taken from research in progress or current literature. Typically offered Spring.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

701 Master's Independent Capstone Project and /or Examination V 1-6 May be repeated for credit. Capstone project or final examination for professional master's degree under the Graduate School. The credits will include a balloted evaluation of the student's completion of the program's capstone/examination requirements by the program's graduate faculty. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and obtain approval from their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 701 credit. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Materials Science or the Materials Science and Engineering PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


Mechanical Engineering (ME)

Spring 2024 Summer 2024 Fall 2024 


116 Engineering Computer-aided Design and Visualization 2 (0-6) Course Prerequisite: MATH 171 or concurrent enrollment. Introduction to 3-D solid modeling, parts, drawings, assemblies, multi-body parts, sketch editing, sheet metal, weldments, surface and mold tools. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

212 Dynamics 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 172 or 182 with a grade of C or better; CE 211 with a grade C or better. Kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies; introduction to mechanical vibration. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

216 Integrated CAD Design 2 (0-6) Course Prerequisite: ME 116 with a C or better; CE 215 or concurrent enrollment. CAD based analysis for engineering design, the application of motion, FEA and CFD, CAD simulations to the engineering design process. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

220 Materials Laboratory 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: CE 215 or concurrent enrollment, or MSE 202 or concurrent enrollment. Mechanical behavior of materials and application to engineering structures. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

241 Engineering Computations 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 273 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; 4 credits of PHYSICS 201 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment, or PHYSICS 201 and 211 both with a C or better, or both with concurrent enrollment. Introduction to the computational methods used for solving numerical problems in engineering. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 241, MSE 241.) Typically offered Fall and Spring.

301 Fundamentals of Thermodynamics 3 Course Prerequisite: 4 credits of PHYSICS 201 with a grade of C or better, or PHYSICS 201 and 211, both with a C or better. Thermodynamic properties of matter, ideal and real gases, work and heat, first and second laws and their application to engineering systems. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

303 Fluid Mechanics 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 212. Fluid statics, laminar and turbulent flow, similitude, pipe flow, boundary layers, lift and drag and measurement techniques. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

304 Heat Transfer 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 301; ME 303; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Conduction, radiation, and convection heat transfer; analytical, numerical, experimental results for solids, liquids, and gases; heat exchanger design. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

306 Thermal and Fluids Laboratory 2 (1-3) Course Prerequisite: ME 301; ME 303; STAT 370 or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Instrumentation, data acquisition, and theory verification in the thermal and fluid sciences. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

310 Manufacturing Processes 2 Course Prerequisite: MSE 201; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering or Materials Science and Engineering. Manufacturing processes, material fabrication, and nontraditional processing. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

311 Manufacturing Processes Laboratory 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: ME 310 or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Manufacturing processes laboratory in machining, welding, forming; manufacturing project. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

312 Manufacturing Engineering 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: MSE 201; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering or Material Science Engineering. Traditional and advanced manufacturing processes for metals, plastics, and ceramics. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

313 Engineering Analysis 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: MATH 315 or concurrent enrollment; CE 215; ME 116; E E 221, CPT S 121, CPT S 131, CPT S 251, ME 241, or MSE 241. Analysis and modeling of engineering problems utilizing numerical and mathematical techniques and computers. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

316 Mechanical Component Analysis and Design 3 Course Prerequisite: CE 215; ME 216 or concurrent enrollment; ME 220 or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Optimal design of machinery; analysis for prevention of machine elements failure. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

348 Dynamics Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 315; ME 212; ME 241, CPT S 121, CPT S 131, or E E 221; all with a letter grade C or better; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Fundamentals of vibration analysis, control systems, system modeling and dynamics analysis. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

401 Mechatronics 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: E E 262; ME 348; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Integration of mechanical and microprocessor-based systems; control theory implemented with data acquisition systems; sensors; actuators, signal conditioning, programmable logic controllers. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

405 Thermal Systems Design 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 304; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Design and analysis of thermofluid systems using principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

406 [M] Experimental Design 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: ME 220; ME 304; ME 306; ME 348; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Designing, conducting, and reporting of experimental investigations involving mechanical equipment. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

407 Computational Fluid Dynamics 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 303. Basic concepts and applications of computational fluid dynamics to the analysis and design of fluid systems and components.

413 Mechanical Behavior of Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: CE 215 and MSE 201, both with a C or better; OR MSE 202 with a C or better. Elasticity, elastic stress distributions; plastic deformation of single and polycrystals; introduction to dislocation theory and its applications; creep, fracture, fatigue. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 413, ME 413). Typically offered Fall.

415 [M] Engineering Design 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 304 or concurrent enrollment; ME 313; ME 316 or concurrent enrollment and ME 348 or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Systems and component design; product development from specifications to manufacturing; team-based CAD design projects; engineering economics; engineering professional skills. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

415 (Effective through Spring 2024) [M] Engineering Design 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 304 or concurrent enrollment; ME 316 or concurrent enrollment and ME 348 or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Systems and component design; product development from specifications to manufacturing; team-based CAD design projects; engineering economics; engineering professional skills. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

416 [CAPS] Mechanical Systems Design 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: ME major; ME 415; senior standing; OR MSE major; MSE 320; MSE 413 or concurrent; one of MSE 331, 332, or 333; junior standing; OR MSE major; MSE 202 with a C minimum; MSE 318 with a C minimum; MSE 413 or concurrent; junior standing. Integrative design in mechanical engineering; multidisciplinary design project considering both technical and non-technical contexts; organizational dynamics and communications. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

419 Air Conditioning 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 304. Principles of heat and moisture transfer; air motion and purity in buildings; design of systems. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

431 Design of Solar Thermal Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 301; ME 303; ME 304; admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. Design of solar thermal systems for heating and cooling of buildings, heating of water, electrical generation, industrial processes and distillation. Typically offered Spring.

432 Wind Energy Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 303 with a C or better; ME 348 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; STAT 360 or 370 with a C or better. Introduction to wind energy engineering concepts including aerodynamics, controls, resource estimation, turbine design, and wind farm design. Typically offered Fall.

436 Combustion Engines 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 301; ME 303. Internal combustion engines; spark ignition engines, diesels, and gas turbines. Typically offered Fall.

439 Applied Aerodynamics 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 303. Aerodynamic lift and drag; circulation; boundary layers, application to subsonic aircraft wing design. Typically offered Spring.

449 Mechanical Vibration 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 348. Vibrating systems and noise producing mechanisms; design for noise and vibration control. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

461 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 315; admitted to a major in engineering or physical sciences; senior standing. Applied nuclear physics; application to the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear reactor core design; nuclear reactor systems and safety. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 461, CHE 461). Typically offered Fall.

462 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering II 3 Fundamentals of nuclear engineering, heat deposition and removal from nuclear reactors, radiation protection, radiation shielding, and licensing, safety, and environmental aspects of nuclear reactor operation. Typically offered Spring.

466 Fundamentals of Engineering Examination Review 1 Course prerequisite: Admitted to a major in engineering or computer science. Review of engineering fundamentals and mechanical engineering discipline specific topics to prepare for the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

472 Finite Element Methods in Design 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 414. Design of selected mechanical systems components using finite element analysis.

473 Advanced CAD and Geometric Modeling 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ME 316. Parametric and feature based CAD/CAM; geometric modeling and its mathematical basis; integration of CAD with design processes and other software.

474 Design for Manufacture and Modern Manufacturing Strategies 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 310 or 312. Design for manufacture and assembly; modern manufacturing philosophies and practices; lean manufacturing; manufacturing cost and time analysis; quality control. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

475 Manufacturing Enterprise Systems -- Automation and Product Realization 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: ME 310 and 311, or ME 312. Manufacturing automation and product realization; information technology and electronic data in manufacturing enterprise systems; product life-cycle management (PLM); sustainable and green manufacturing. Field trip to manufacturing industries required. Typically offered Fall.

481 Control Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: ME 348. Analysis and design of feedback control systems. Credit not granted for both ME 481 and 581. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

483 Topics in Mechanical Engineering V 1 (0-4) to 4 (0-16) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 7 credits. Contemporary topics in mechanical engineering. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

485 Introduction to Robotics and AI 3 Course Prerequisite: CPT S 121, CPT S 131, ME 241, or MSE 241; ME 348; ME 401. An exploration of the Robot Operating System (ROS) and solutions to simple AI problems using existing machine learning frameworks. Typically offered Spring.

488 Professional Practice Coop/Internship I V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; integration of coursework with on-the-job professional experience. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 488, BIO ENG 488, CHE 488, CE 488, CPT S 488, E E 488, ME 488, MSE 488, SDC 488). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

488 (Effective through Spring 2024) Professional Practice Coop/Internship I V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; integration of coursework with on-the-job professional experience. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 488, BIO ENG 488, CHE 488, CE 488, CPT S 488, E E 488, ME 488, MSE 488, SDC 488). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

495 Internship in Mechanical Industry V 3-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 credits. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Mechanical Engineering. By interview only. Students work full time on engineering assignment in approved industries with industrial and faculty supervision. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

501 Continuum Mechanics 3 Unified presentation of principles common to all branches of solid and fluid mechanics; viscous fluids, elasticity, viscoelasticity, and plasticity. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 501, MATH 570.) Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

502 Sustainability Assessment for Engineering Design 3 Sustainability assessment, including environmental, societal, and economic assessment, in design and planning for entire product life cycle. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

503 Systems Design Approaches for Sustainability 3 Sustainability in systems design methodologies; systems modeling and decision-making for sustainability; multidisciplinary design optimization; research topics. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

507 Additive Manufacturing 3 Additive manufacturing processes and their applications in ceramic, metallic, polymeric, and composite materials. Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge in materials science and manufacturing. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 507, ME 507). Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

509 MEMS Engineering 3 (2-3) Introduction to the design, fabrication and application of microelectromechanical systems. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 509, MSE 509). Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

513 Theory of Plasticity and its Physical Foundations 3 Phenomenological plasticity and viscoplasticity of polycrystalline metals and alloys, polymers and granular media; deformation mechanisms; dislocation mechanics and interactions; dislocation motion; slip and climb; crystal plasticity; size effects and gradient models. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 513, ME 513). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

513 (Effective through Summer 2024) Theory of Plasticity and its Physical Foundations 3 Phenomenological plasticity and viscoplasticity of polycrystalline metals and alloys, polymers and granular media; deformation mechanisms; dislocation mechanics and interactions; dislocation motion; slip and climb; crystal plasticity; size effects and gradient models. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 513, ME 513, MATSE 513). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

514 Thermodynamics of Solids 3 Thermodynamic properties of solid solutions; models for substitutional and interstitial solutions; configurational and non-configurational contributions; calculation of phase diagrams. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 514, ME 514). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

515 Convective Heat Transfer 3 Derivation of the energy conservation equation; laminar and turbulent forced convection heat transfer with internal and external flow; free convection. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

516 Conduction and Radiation Heat Transfer 3 Principles of conduction and radiation heat transfer with focus on solving conduction and radiation problems of engineering interest. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

517 Thin Films 3 Materials science aspect of thin films, including growth, characterization, and properties for electrical, mechanical, corrosion, and optical behavior. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 517, ME 517). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

520 Multiscale Modeling in Thermomechanics of Materials 3 Multiscale problems in thermomechanics of materials; practical and computational aspects of homogenization, granular materials, dislocation plasticity and atomistic methods. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 520, MSE 520). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

521 Fundamentals of Fluids I 3 Governing equations of fluid mechanics accompanied by applications of Navier-Stokes equation to simple flow situations, boundary layer analysis. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

525 Biomechanics 3 Methods for analysis of rigid body and deformable mechanics; application to biological tissue, especially bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendon and muscle. (Crosslisted course offered as BIO ENG 425/525, ME 525). Credit not granted for more than one of BIO ENG 425, BIO ENG 525, or ME 525. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

525 (Effective through Summer 2024) Biomechanics 3 Methods for analysis of rigid body and deformable mechanics; application to biological tissue, especially bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendon and muscle. (Crosslisted course offered as BIO ENG 425/525, ME 525). Credit not granted for more than one of BIO ENG 425, BIO ENG 525, or ME 525. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

526 Statistical Thermodynamics 3 Microscopic development of equilibrium; classical and quantum particle statistics; statistical description of real and ideal gases, solids, and liquids. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

527 Macroscopic Thermodynamics 3 Advanced thermodynamics from macroscopic viewpoint; basic postulates, equilibrium, stability, property relations; application to thermal-fluid and solid mechanics; irreversible thermodynamics. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

530 Elasticity 3 Theory of kinematics of solid deformable bodies; conservation laws applied to an elastic continuum; generalized linear stress-strain behavior with applications. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 530, MSE 530). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

531 Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 3 Overview of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their biomedical, energy, and environmental applications; structures, properties, synthesis of nanoscale materials and fabrication of nanostructured devices. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 531, ME 531.) Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge of materials, engineering, chemistry. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

531 (Effective through Summer 2024) Nanoscience and Nanotechnology 3 Overview of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their biomedical, energy, and environmental applications; structures, properties, synthesis of nanoscale materials and fabrication of nanostructured devices. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 531, MATSE 531, ME 531.) Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge of materials, engineering, chemistry. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

532 Finite Elements 3 Theory of finite elements; applications to general engineering systems considered as assemblages of discrete elements. (Crosslisted course offered as CE 532, ME 532). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

534 Mechanics of Composite Materials 3 Analysis of micromechanical and macromechanical behavior of composite materials with emphasis on fiber-reinforced composite; prediction of properties; stiffness and strength theories; laminated beams and plates; dynamic behavior; environmental effects. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 534, MSE 534). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

537 Fracture Mechanics and Mechanisms 3 Fracture mechanics and mechanisms and the microstructural origins of toughness in metals, polymers and composites. (Crosslisted course offered as MSE 537, ME 537). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

540 Advanced Dynamics of Physical Systems 3 Newtonian dynamics, rotating coordinate systems; Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics; gyroscopic mechanics, other applications. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

556 Numerical Modeling in Fluid Mechanics 3 Fundamental concepts in development of numerical models for fluid flow with applications to steady and unsteady flows. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

565 Nuclear Reactor Engineering 3 Reactor power distribution; thermal and exposure limits; critical heat flux and pressure design; neutronic/thermal hydraulic relationships; transient/accident analysis. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

574 Design for Additive Manufacturing 3 Design considerations and techniques to improve the performance for parts and components fabricated by additive manufacturing, including restrictive design considerations and opportunistic design. Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge in materials science and manufacturing. Typically offered Spring.

575 Computer Control of Manufacturing Automation Systems 3 CNC Machines: component types; selection and integration; drive methods and feedback control; controller programming. Required preparation: ME 348 or equivalent. Typically offered Spring.

579 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering V 1-3 May be repeated for credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

581 Control Systems 3 Analysis and design of feedback control systems. Credit not granted for both ME 481 and 581. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

582 Robot Kinematics and Dynamics 3 Kinematics and dynamics of robotic systems including theoretical and practical treatment of rigid body motion. Typically offered Fall.

583 Machine Vision 3 Theoretical and practical treatment of image formation, camera calibration, stereo vision, image processing algorithms, and vision-based control. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

598 Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit. Current research interests. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

701 Master's Independent Capstone Project and /or Examination V 1-6 May be repeated for credit. Capstone project or final examination for professional master's degree under the Graduate School. The credits will include a balloted evaluation of the student's completion of the program's capstone/examination requirements by the program's graduate faculty. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and obtain approval from their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 701 credit. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Mechanical Engineering or Engineering Science PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 800, MECH 800). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

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