The Washington State University Catalog

Department of Human Development

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

Department of Human Development

hd.wsu.edu
Johnson Tower 501
509-335-8439

Chair and Associate Professor, M. Cleveland; Professors, M. Diversi, D. Handy, L. Hill, J. Lanigan, L. Parker, E. Soliday; Associate Professors, C. Bolkan, B. Boyd, M. Bumpus, B. Cooper, R. Cooper, P. Pendry, K. Rodgers, Y. Sano, A. Whitehall, E. Weybright; Assistant Professors, C. Bletscher, T. Burkhard, J. Duckworth, J. Hewa, M. K. Patton, S. Perone, S. Reisz, A. Salazar, S. Waters, R. Weaver; Instructors, L. Krupke, A. Lawrence, S. Rolerkite; Adjunct Instructors, T. Ashford, D. Bice, W. Ewest, M. Garcia, S. Grant, N. Kaivan, N. Porter, D. Rock, S. Rusca, C. Seeley, M. Strey; Professors Emeriti, M. K. Deen, J. Dillman, S. Horton, J. McReynolds, D. Nelson, K. Peterson, T. Power, G. Tan, M. Tate, M. Wandschneider, M. Young.

Undergraduate Program

In the Department of Human Development, students focus on how children, youth, adults, and families develop, change, and face challenges throughout the lifespan. The Department of Human Development is a multidisciplinary department devoted to understanding the nature of human development within the context of families, schools, and communities. Students completing a Human Development degree are well prepared for a wide range of careers working with children, adolescents, adults, and/or families in a variety of professional settings; many Human Development graduates are also well equipped to enter graduate school in a number of disciplines.

State certification as a family and consumer sciences teacher at the secondary level is available through Human Development. The department also offers four certificates: early childhood education, adolescence, gerontology, and family studies. 

Students completing a human development degree may complete a minor or approved certificate of study in another department. A minor or certificate of study should be selected in consultation with a human development advisor, preferably by the end of the third semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

We expect our graduating students will demonstrate: 1) an understanding of social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development across the lifespan in the family context; 2) an understanding of how contextual systems interact to influence family and individual development; 3) the ability to critically select, evaluate, and utilize information to understand and benefit individuals and families; 4) writing, listening, and speaking appropriate for human development related occupations; 5) application of human development knowledge and skills in professional settings.

Graduate School Preparation

The human development degree provides preparation for graduate work leading to teaching, research, counseling, or administrative positions in domains such as academia, social services, and counseling.

Graduate Program

The department also administers an interdisciplinary doctoral program in Prevention Science.  Students in the program learn to conduct basic research on risk and protective factors, and to develop, evaluate, and disseminate scientifically-based programs to promote the well-being of children, youth, and their families.  The program is offered in collaboration with the Colleges of Communication, Education, Medicine, and Nursing, as well as WSU Extension.  Graduates are prepared for careers as faculty members, program evaluators, research analysts, and research associates to work in a range of settings including universities, research institutes, social service agencies, and consulting firms.




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Human Development - Family and Consumer Sciences Option (120 Credits)

Students can be admitted as a Human Development major after completing 24 credits and earning a GPA of at least 2.0. A grade of C or better in all H D courses that apply to the option, including substitutions, is required to (a) maintain admission in the major; and (b) complete the Bachelor of Arts degree in Human Development. Of the 49 H D credits required for the major, a minimum of 21 must be taken at WSU.
First Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
BIOLOGY 140 [BSCI]3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
H D 101 [SSCI]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3 or 4
Second TermCredits
ENGLISH 201 [WRTG]13
H D 2002
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Humanities [HUM]3
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab24
Second Year
First TermCredits
AMDT Elective33
H D 2043
H D 2203
H D 3063
Second TermCredits
H D 3023
H D 3073
H D 310 [M]3
HBM 2583
TCH LRN 3013
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
AMDT Elective33
H D 320 [M]3
H D 350 [DIVR]3
H D 4793
TCH LRN 3172
Second TermCredits
H D 410 [M]3
H D 4803
Integrative Capstone [CAPS]3
TCH LRN 4643
TCH LRN 4653
TCH LRN 4662
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
AG ED 4402
ED PSYCH 4683
H D 4993
TCH LRN 467 3
TCH LRN 4692
TCH LRN 4703
Second TermCredits
H D 4078
TCH LRN 4158

Footnotes
1One from ENGLISH 201, 301, 302 [M] or 402 is required for admission to the Teacher Education Program. Students who take ENGLISH 302 will need to take an additional [WRTG] or [COMM] course.
2Recommend one from AMDT 210 or CHEM 101.
3Select two from: AMDT 210, 211, or 417.

Human Development - General Option (120 Credits)

Students can be admitted as a Human Development major after completing 24 credits and earning a GPA of at least 2.0. A cumulative GPA of 2.6 or better in all H D courses that apply to the option, including substitutions is required to (a) maintain admission in the major; and (b) complete the Bachelor of Arts degree in Human Development. Of the 42-44 H D credits required for the major, a minimum of 21 must be taken at WSU.
First Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI]13
H D 101 [SSCI]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3
Written Communication [WRTG]3
Second TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI] (with lab)14
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
H D 2002
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Minor, Certificate, and/or General Electives23
Second Year
First TermCredits
H D 2043
H D 2203
Humanities [HUM]3
Minor, Certificate, and/or General Electives26
Second TermCredits
H D 306, 307, or 3083
H D 320, 334, 341, 342, 430, 480, or 4823-4
H D 350 [DIVR]3
Minor, Certificate, and/or General Electives26
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
H D 300, 301, 302, or 3603
H D 306, 307, or 3083
H D 310 [M]3
Minor, Certificate, or General Electives26
Second TermCredits
H D 403, 405, 406, or 4793
Minor, Certificate, or General Electives212
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
H D 385, 445, or 4973,43
H D 496 or Elective31
Integrative Capstone [CAPS]3
Minor, Certificate, or General Electives28
Second TermCredits
H D 410 [M]3
H D 446 or 4985,63-6
Minor, Certificate, or General Electives 9

Footnotes
1For a total of 7 credits—one Biological Sciences [BSCI] and one Physical Sciences [PSCI] course, including one lab course.
2Students strongly encouraged to pursue a minor or certificate. Elective credits should include sufficient 300-400-level courses to meet University requirement of 40 upper-division credits.
3H D 385 and 496 are required for Vancouver students only and must be completed before H D 498.
4H D 497 is required for Pullman and Global students and must be completed prior to H D 498.
5All H D majors complete a practicum/internship experience. H D 446 is reserved for students completing the certificate in Early Childhood Education and requires a half-day each day, 5 days a week for a semester. For Pullman and Global students H D 445 must be taken before H D 446 but no more than two semesters before taking the practicum. For Vancouver students H D 385 or 445 must be taken before completion of H D 446.
6The internship course (H D 498) can be taken during the summer semester of the junior or senior year. For Pullman and Global students, H D 497 must be taken before H D 498 but no more than two semesters before taking the internship. For Vancouver students, H D 385 and H D 496 must be taken before completion of H D 498. Vancouver students are required to take 3 credits of H D 498. Pullman and Global students must complete 4 credits of H D 498.


Minors

General Human Development

The General Human Development minor requires 18 credits and a cumulative GPA of 2.6 or better in coursework used to fulfill this minor. Required coursework includes H D 101, 204, 220, and 9 additional H D elective credits selected from H D 300, 301, 302, 306, 307, 308, 320, 334, 341, 350, 360, 385, 403, 405, 406, 408, 430, 479, 480, or 482. A maximum of 3 credits of H D 485 may apply to the upper-division requirement of the minor. Coursework must include a minimum of 9 credits of 300-400-level courses taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.



Certificates

Adolescence

The department of Human Development offers a Certificate in Adolescence.  The certificate reflects a high standard of training and experience in this specific area of human development. Non-human development majors are required to complete any prerequisites for the internship requirement. The requirements include 6 credits in H D core courses that support the area of certification, 15 credits in required and optional courses and 4 credits of internship that reflect the area of certification. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.6 in those courses that count toward the certificate. 

 

Certificate requirements:

Required courses: H D 220, 302, 307, 408, 498, one other 300-400 level H D course, H D 479 or 480, and one from PSYCH 230, 265, SOC 360, or 362.


Early Childhood Education

The Department of Human Development offers a Certificate in Early Childhood Education. The certificate is only available to students who (a) are living in the state of Washington; (b) are currently majoring in Human Development or who have completed the Human Development major within the past 10 years; and (c) have satisfied the necessary prerequisites. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.6 in courses required for the certificate. Required courses to complete the certificate include H D 302, 306, 341, 342, 446, 482.


Family Studies

The department of Human Development offers a Certificate in Family Studies.  The certificate reflects a high standard of training and experience in the specific area of human development. Non-human development majors are required to complete any prerequisites for the internship requirement. The requirements include 6 credits in H D core courses that support the area of certification, 15 credits in required and optional courses, and 4 credits of internship that reflect the area of certification. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.6 in those courses that count toward the certificate. 

Certificate requirements:
Required courses: H D 204, 301, 302, 320, 350, 403, one other 300-400 level H D course, H D 498.


Gerontology

The department of Human Development offers a Certificate in Gerontology.   The certificate reflects a high standard of training and experience in the specific area of human development. Non-human development majors are required to complete any prerequisites for the internship requirement. The requirements include 6 credits in H D core courses that support the area of certification, 15 credits in required and optional courses, and 4 credits of internship that reflect the area of certification. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 2.6 in those courses that count toward the certificate. 
 

Certificate requirements:

Required courses: BIOLOGY 140; H D 308 or 405; PSYCH 363 or 490; SOC 351 or 356. Elective Courses, 6 credits minimum from the following: BIOLOGY 233; HBM 375, 497; H D 308 (if not used in required), 360; KINES 264, 361; MGMT 101, 301; PHIL 103, 365; PSYCH 320, 363, 490 (if not used in required); SOC 250, 351, 356 (if not used in required); H D 497, H D 498.    

Human Services Case Management and Administration

 

The Certificate in Human Services Case Management and Administration, administered by the Department of Human Development, is designed to assist students in building a theoretical and applied understanding of working with people in a variety of human service settings including, but not limited to, social service agencies, health care agencies, non-profits, and educational institutions. Students are able to concentrate on either case management, which is focused on those wanting to work with clients, or administration, which is developed for those interested in managerial and supervisory roles.

 

To be admitted into the Certificate Program, students must (1) be admitted to their WSU major or be a non-degree-seeking student, (2) have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0, and (3) have completed 60 semester credits.  The certificate is awarded based upon successful completion of 9 credits of core courses: H D 301 or 403, H D 385, H D 430, MGMT 301 or PSYCH 308, and 9 credits of either Case Management or Administration focus electives.  Case Management focus electives: CRM J 365/SOC 367, CRM J 403, H D 300, 350, 360, 410, 498, POL S 436, PSYCH 110, 333, 444.  Administration focus electives: ACCTG 230, 231, H D 334, 479, 498, MGMT 401, 450, MKTG 379, POL S 436, 442, 445, PSYCH 308, 309. Students must maintain a cumulative GPA of 2.6 in those courses that count towards the certificate and 15 of the 18 credits must be taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Human Development (H_D)

Fall 2020 Spring 2021 


101 [SSCI] Human Development Across the Lifespan 3 Overview of lifespan development from a psychosocial ecological perspective; individuals, families, organizations, and communities and their interrelationships. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

200 Introduction to the Field of Human Development 2 Introduction to the multidisciplinary field of human development and the research and outreach of faculty in this field.

204 [SSCI] Family Interactions 3 Introduction to the study of family processes: family generational, emotional, boundary, rule, and ritualistic systems. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

205 [COMM] Developing Effective Communication and Life Skills 4 (3-2) Enhancing interpersonal communication, leadership, and team skills through action-based learning. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

220 Human Development Theories 3 Introduction to foundational human development theories, key concepts, comparison, and application of theory to inform practice. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

235 Introduction to Early Childhood Programs 1 Course Prerequisite: H D 201 or 340. Introduction to the field of early childhood education; connection with a field placement site in a community based child care program for H D 342 is required. For students completing Early Childhood certificate. S, F grading.

275 Special Topics in Human Development: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

300 Child Maltreatment 3 Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing Overview of causes, identification, reporting, and treatment of children who are abused and/or neglected. Recommended preparation H D 204. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

301 Family Stress and Coping 3 Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing Examination of the nature and course of family crisis, using a family systemic approach, including principles used in intervention strategies. Recommended preparation H D 204. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

302 Parent-Child Relationships 3 Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing Parenting in contemporary society with focus on reciprocity of parent-child relationships and diversity of families. Recommended preparation: H D 204. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

306 Child Development 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 101; sophomore standing. Understanding growth and change across all developmental domains from prenatal through age 10, including contextual influences on development. Recommended preparation: H D 220. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

307 Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 101; sophomore standing. Understanding growth and change across all developmental domains from adolescence through emerging adulthood, including contextual influences. Recommended preparation: H D 220. Typically offered Spring.

308 Adult Development 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 101; sophomore standing. Understanding growth and change in adulthood, including contextual influences on the adult years of human development. Recommended preparation: H D 220. Typically offered Fall.

310 [M] Research Methods 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 200; admitted to the major in Human Development; sophomore standing. Overview of research techniques in human development; methods of evaluating research products. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

320 [M] Resource Management 3 Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing Styles of managing material, human and environmental resources with families; analysis of consumer role; interaction of consumers, government, market: various approaches to problem solving with individuals and families; effects on communities, families, and individuals. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

334 [SSCI] Principles of Community Development 3 Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing Factors influencing how communities grow and decline and the ways in which social interventions influence these outcomes.

341 Guidance in Early Childhood Programs 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 306; sophomore standing. Theories of child guidance; understanding of child behavior; strategies and techniques for effective group and individual guidance of young children. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

342 Curriculum for Early Childhood Programs 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: H D 235; H D 341; sophomore standing; by permission only. Planning and implementation of developmentally appropriate curriculum for use in programs serving young children. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

350 [DIVR] Family Diversity 3 Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing Preparation for students in human service professions to work with ethnic, cultural, economic, language, gender, religious and other types of diversity. Typically offered Fall.

360 Death and Dying 3 Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing Death and dying throughout life and in different contexts; manner of death, grief, and legal and ethical considerations. Recommended preparation: H D 204.

385 Perspectives in Human Services 3 Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing In-depth study of human service practice, theoretical perspectives and strategies for delivery of appropriate services to diverse clientele.

403 [CAPS] Families in Poverty 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Examining poverty in US and globally; description of groups most often poor; identification of effective solutions and successful interventions. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

405 Gerontology 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Examination and analysis of social context of aging including public policy, implications of demographic shifts, and quality-of-life issues. Typically offered Spring.

406 Work and Family 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Issues related to work and family; workplace environments; fostering effective policy responses to family needs; role of work-family coordination.

407 Student Teaching for Family and Consumer Sciences V 4-16 Course Prerequisite: TCH LRN 415; junior standing; by permission only. Supervised teaching in public schools, including seminars reflecting on effective teaching. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

408 Advanced Adolescent Development 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. In-depth examination of theories and research; developmental issues and prevention and intervention programs for school-aged child and adolescent. Typically offered Fall.

410 [M] Public Policy Issues in Human Development 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 310; junior standing. Family policy issues in a changing society; ecological perspective; relationship of public policy to communities, organizations, families, and individuals. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

415 [CAPS] Peak Experiences in Leadership 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Experiential human development course that utilizes challenge and application to develop personal and group leadership skills. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

430 [M] Professional and Grant Writing Skills 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 385; junior standing. Examination and development of skills important for effective professionals; communication, leadership, ethical behavior, cultural competence, grant writing, evaluation, and others. Typically offered Spring.

445 Early Childhood Professional Preparation Seminar 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 341; junior standing; by permission only. Preparation for careers and practicum placement in early childhood education, with an emphasis in self-assessment and professionalism; procurement of field practicum with an early childhood program in preparation for H D 446 Practicum in Early Childhood Programs. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

446 Practicum in Early Childhood Programs 6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: H D 342; junior standing; by permission only. Supervised teaching; emphasis on skill building in working with diverse groups of children and building partnerships with families.

449 Early Childhood Seminar 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 306; junior standing. Identification and examination of current issues and trends in early childhood education with emphasis on child, family, and community concerns. Typically offered Spring.

464 Administration of Early Childhood Programs 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 306; junior standing. Organization, administration, and management of early childhood programs; finance, program development, service delivery, personnel concerns, resource development, and evaluation.

479 Planning and Evaluation in Human Development 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Design, implementation and evaluation of community/school programs; needs assessment; appropriate curriculum resource identification; outcomes development; includes individual and program evaluation. Typically offered Fall.

480 Instructional Strategies in Human Development 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Identification and use of instructional strategies; evaluation of strategies to determine appropriate use and effectiveness with a variety of learners. Typically offered Spring.

482 Child Assessment and Evaluation 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 306; junior standing. Understanding aspects of assessment and evaluation of young children; selection, administration, summary development, ethics and professional responsibilities, evaluation and follow-up. Typically offered Fall.

485 Participation in Human Development Research V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: By permission only. Supervised participation in faculty research including data collection, analysis, literature review, preparation of findings. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

486 Special Topics in Human Development: Study Abroad V 1-15 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 15 hours. Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing S, F grading.

487 Special Topics in Human Development V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Assessment and evaluation of families and children. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

495 Instructional Practicum V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: By permission only. Opportunity to assist with instruction; experience in further study of topic, organization of material, grading, management of resources. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

496 Field Placement Preparation 1 Course Prerequisite: H D majors or H D certificate students; junior standing; by permission only. Investigation of career goals, interviewing and professional presentation, resume preparation, internship competencies, and field placement procurement. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

497 Professional Preparation Seminar 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing; by permission only. Human service career preparation through examining related careers, career self-assessment, professional presentation, professional ethics, professional competencies, and field placement procurement. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

498 Field Placement V 1 (0-3) to 9 (0-27) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 hours. Course Prerequisite: H D 385 and 496, or H D 497; by permission only. Self-initiated, supervised work experience with appropriate private organizations, businesses, or government agencies; interaction with professionals in related fields. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: By permission only. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

505 Developing Effective Leadership: Tidal Leadership 2 Customized leadership course for acquiring essential skills beyond the discipline skills for professional and personal success; build a personal leadership platform. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

511 Theory and Substance of Human Development I 3 Human development theories; application to life span development, cultural variations, resources, problem solving, interaction of families and individuals with other systems.

514 Research Methods in Human Development II 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 513. Integration of formal decision making into the social science research process; procedures appropriate for experimental, quasi-experimental and field research. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

520 Adolescence 3 In-depth examination of theories and research, developmental issues and prevention and intervention programs for school-aged children and adolescents. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

550 Seminar on Family Relationships 3 Survey of family studies topics and issues examined from a research point of view. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

558 Parent-Child Relationships 3 The reciprocal interactions among family members will be examined; theoretical perspectives and empirical findings will be explored in terms of implications for education and practice. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

560 Seminar in Child Development 3 Survey of literature on selected areas in child development; discussion of research and application related to current issues and trends. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

561 Advanced Curriculum for Early Childhood Programs 3 Opportunity to explore curriculum practices in early childhood education; discussion, evaluation and adaptation of curricula based on current research.

562 Administration and Leadership in Programs 3 Examining early childhood administrator role; analysis and application of research to administration, developing concrete skills necessary for successful administration.

580 Families, Community and Public Policy 3 Course Prerequisite: H D 560. Analysis of family policy research; role of family policy research in public policy and knowledge building processes. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

586 Special Topics in Human Development V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Assessment and evaluation of families and children. Typically offered Fall.

598 Professional Internship 3 Supervised individual experiences with related organizations, businesses, or government agencies; opportunities for interaction with professionals in related fields. S, F grading.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


Prevention Science (PREV_SCI)

Fall 2020 Spring 2021 


508 Longitudinal Structural Equation Modeling 3 Longitudinal structural equation modeling and the use of Mplus statistical software to perform and interpret a broad range of longitudinal structural equation models. Recommended preparation: ED PSYCH 576, PSYCH 514, PSYCH 516, or previous knowledge of multivariate analysis and factor analysis. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

510 Multilevel Modeling II: Advanced Multilevel Models for Longitudinal Data 3 Advanced applications of the general linear mixed model (aka multilevel model, hierarchical linear model, latent growth curve model, random coefficients model) used to analyze data from longitudinal, repeated measures designs; conduct cumulative steps in a longitudinal multilevel analysis, including setting up data file and coding variables, evaluating fixed and random effects and interpreting covariance structures, predicting between- and within-person variation using time-invariant and time-varying covariates, and interpreting empirical findings. Recommended preparation: ED PSYCH 575 or previous knowledge of multivariate analysis and multilevel modeling. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

511 Introduction to Prevention Science 3 Disciplinary roots; the epidemiological approach to risk and prevention; design, implementation, and dissemination of preventive interventions. Typically offered Fall.

512 Finite and Growth Mixture Modeling 3 Introduction to a specific type of latent variable statistical models, commonly referred to as finite mixture models, which include several distinct subtypes including latent class analysis, latent profile analysis, latent transition analysis, and latent class growth analysis; conceptual background for models and application of models in practice. Recommended preparation: ED PSYCH 514 and ED PSYCH 576, or knowledge of multivariate analysis and psychometrics. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

513 Research Methods in Prevention Science 3 Introduction to process of research and methods in prevention science; techniques of research, data collection, and data analysis procedures. Typically offered Fall.

535 Effective Prevention Strategies I 3 Community mobilization and problem analysis; program selection, implementation, and management; grant writing. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

540 Effective Prevention Strategies II 3 Evaluation of prevention science programs. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Prevention Sciences PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

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