The Washington State University Catalog

School of Languages, Cultures, and Race

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

School of Languages, Cultures, and Race

slcr.wsu.edu
Thompson 110
509-335-4135

School Director and Professor, C. Lugo-Lugo; Professors, M. Bloodsworth-Lugo, J. Grenier-Winther (Vancouver), L. Guerrero, D. Leonard, V. Navarro-Daniels; Associate Professors, M. Hubert, X. Liu, R. Ong, J. Streamas; Assistant Professors, S. Ginsburg, A. Ramírez; Career Track Professor, S. Davis; Career Track Associate Professors, J. Bonzo, W. Cao, C. Gulam (Vancouver), K. Niimi, M. Pieracci (Tri Cities), M. Previto; Career Track Assistant Professors, R. Abo, J. Arellano-Serratos (Tri Cities), K. Jennings, S. Lopez-Lopez, M. Sileoni; Lecturers, M. Black, J. Pérez, C. Shull; Adjunct Instructors, B. Hazelwood (Vancouver), M. Lee López (Vancouver) Associate Director of Humanities and Social Sciences programs, and Academic Advisor for Comparative Ethnic Studies, A. Chow; Academic Advisor for Foreign Languages and Cultures, L. Heustis; Academic Advisor for Humanities, A. Rocha; Academic Advisor for Social Sciences, D. Spencer-Curtis; Academic Coordinator, S. Alvarez.

The School of Languages, Cultures, and Race (SLCR) cultivates deeper understandings of linguistic, cultural, national, citizenship, and racial perspectives in a global context as explored through an interdisciplinary approach grounded on the humanities and social sciences. Located in historic Thompson Hall, the School stands as a bridge between the past and the future through its degrees: American studies and culture, comparative ethnic studies, foreign languages and cultures, humanities, and social sciences. Foreign languages have been offered at WSU since 1890 and Thompson remains the site for one of the first dedicated language learning centers in the nation (established in 1911). The interdisciplinary degrees in Humanities and Social Sciences date back to 1911. At the same time, the School includes the contemporary and transdisciplinary envisioning of culture and race studies that American Studies and Culture, and Comparative Ethnic studies embody. Together, these programs collaborate in finding innovative responses to the challenges of our ever-changing societies.

The School fosters critical literacy, intercultural engagement, and the pursuit of global social justice through grounded, holistic engagement in interdisciplinary inquiry and programs. Language studies in context, the study of transnational cultural and race matters, and integrative approaches to linguistic, social, and cultural phenomena provide students with the skills, experiences, and perspectives necessary to thrive in an increasingly diverse and heterogeneous global society. The school interests are centered on the following:

  • Critical analysis of culture and its products around the globe.
  • The effects of popular culture and media on social articulations of race and ethnicity.
  • Social and cultural production of languages.
  • Social and cultural influence of languages.
  • Intersectional and interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and the social sciences. 
  • Innovative approaches in teaching and scholarly production.

Above all, the school encourages its constituencies to make a difference by learning about and demonstrating a commitment to issues in our changing world through undergraduate and graduate education, scholarship, and outreach.

The School offers Bachelor of Arts degree programs in Comparative Ethnic Studies, Foreign Languages and Cultures (Chinese Language and Culture, French, Japanese, and Spanish), Humanities (including an International Studies track with major concentration areas in Latin American Area Studies, Germanic Area Studies, French and Francophone Area Studies, and European Area Studies; and other tracks in Linguistics, and Religious Studies), and Social Sciences (with an option in Personnel Psychology/ Human Resources, available at WSU-Vancouver only.) The Humanities and Social Sciences degrees are not identified with a specific subject-matter field on the diploma. Additional or second majors in Language for the Professions are available in French, German, Japanese, and Spanish.

The School offers undergraduate minors in language (Chinese, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish) and cultural minors in American Indian Studies, Film Studies, French Area Studies, German Area Studies, Global Studies, Latin American Area Studies, Popular Culture, and Russian Area Studies. Language certificates in Arabic, Italian, Korean, and ‘Core Competencies in Spanish Language and Culture’ are available as well.

The School offers two graduate degree programs: a Master of Arts program in Hispanic Studies, and Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy program in American Studies and Culture.

Facilities

The School is supported by the Language Learning Resource Center (LLRC) located in the historic Thompson Hall since 1911. It provides individual foreign language students with access to 12 Windows 7 PC’s, as well as two HD TVs with VCR & Blu-Ray DVD players, a dedicated computer with a high-speed duplex scanner plus a flat-bed scanner and editing software (Photoshop, Adobe Acrobat Professional, etc.) LLRC also provides foreign language courses with class access to 18 Windows 7 Enterprise computers. The upper mezzanine level (balcony) holds 9 Windows 7 computers and a 55″ HD-TV with a dedicated HD-DVD & Blu-Ray player.  In addition, the lab/classroom in Thompson 28 (ground floor) holds 15 Windows 7 computers and an HD LCD Projector.

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES

Bachelor of Arts in Comparative Ethnic Studies

The Comparative Ethnic Studies program (CES) within the SLCR brings together leading scholars committed to teaching and research, who have created an intellectual community at the forefront of critical cultural studies in the Pacific Northwest. Comparative Ethnic Studies embraces interdisciplinary, comparative, and transnational approaches to studying race relations and the intersectionality of race, gender, class, citizenship, sexuality, and globalization. The course work fosters an in-depth understanding of the complexities of formations of race and culture.

The major in comparative ethnic studies prepares students to work and function in the multiracial and multicultural world in which we live. Students majoring in comparative ethnic studies must complete 36 hours in CES, as outlined in the program of studies. CES also offers a minor in Comparative Ethnic Studies.  Courses for the minor may not be taken pass/fail. Students interested in declaring a major or minor in CES should contact the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Center at Daggy 201, 509-335-8731, or the School.

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of the BA in Comparative Ethnic Studies, students will be able to:

  1. Recognize and summarize impact and intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality.
  2. Identify and articulate one's social location in a complex, structurally unequal, and often contradictory world.
  3. Display familiarity with multiple perspectives, employ other interpretations, and consider a range of human experiences in analysis.
  4. Identify and assess social norms and assumptions and envision alternative social norms and practices.
  5. Ask critical questions and formulates a relevant research plan; access information tools to get relevant answers.
  6. Articulate and utilize the basic tools and texts of the interdiscipline.
  7. Examine the influence of historical context on the formation of local, national, and global political and social narratives.
  8. Engage in active and critical verbal and/or written discussion of issues from scholarly sources.

Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Languages and Cultures

The Bachelor of Arts in Foreign Languages and Cultures provides WSU students with the linguistic proficiency and intercultural competence that will allow them to become true and effective global leaders. The degree offers several major programs of study: Chinese Language and Culture, French, Japanese, and Spanish, with teaching options in French, Japanese, and Spanish, as well as Language for the Profession Second Majors in French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. Language minors are available in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish. Cultural minors are also possible in French Area Studies, German Area Studies, Global Studies, Latin American Area Studies and Russian Area Studies. Two year programs of study leading to Language Certificates in Arabic, Italian, Korean, and ‘Core Competencies in Spanish Language and Culture’ are available. Students interested in declaring a major or minor or obtaining a certificate should contact the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Center at Daggy 201, 509-335-8731, or the School.

Student Learning Outcomes for European Languages (French and Spanish programs) Majors:

The program outcomes promote linguistic proficiency and intercultural competence:

  1. Linguistic Proficiency: Students can demonstrate an Advanced Low level of proficiency (as defined in ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines) in the target language in speaking, writing, listening and reading.
    • Speaking: Students are able to handle a variety of communicative tasks. They are able to participate in most informal and some formal conversations on topics related to school, home, and leisure activities. They can also speak about some topics related to employment, current events, and matters of public and community interest.
    • Writing: Students are able to meet basic work and/or academic writing needs. They demonstrate the ability to narrate, describe and express viewpoints about familiar topics in major timeframes with some control of aspect.
    • Listening and Reading: Students are able to understand short conventional narrative and descriptive texts (spoken and/or written) such as descriptions of persons, places, and things, and narrations about past, present, and future events with a clear underlying structure though their comprehension may be uneven. They can understand the main facts and some supporting details. Comprehension may often derive primarily from situational and subject-matter knowledge.
  2. Intercultural Competence: Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of other cultures and their products. By the time they graduate from our program, they will be able to:
    • Recognize and describe the historical, social, economic, and political forces that shape society in the target culture.
    • Analyze and critique the products of the target culture (film, literature, art, popular culture, media, etc.) within their context, including conducting basic research tasks.
    • Examine the validity of one’s own cultural beliefs, behaviors and norms by contrasting and comparing them with those of the target culture.
    • Perceive and value cultural diversity and reinterpret the place of the self as an identity culturally situated in the global context.

Student Learning Outcomes for Asian Languages (Chinese and Japanese programs) Majors:

The program outcomes promote linguistic proficiency and intercultural competence:

  1. Linguistic Proficiency: Students can demonstrate an Intermediate High level of proficiency (as defined in ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines) in the target language in speaking, writing, listening, and reading.
    • Speaking: Students are able to handle with ease and confidence a substantial number of communicative tasks and social situations that require an exchange of basic information related to their home, work, school, recreation, and particular interests. They can also speak about topics related to current issues and matters of public and community interest using connected discourse of paragraph length. They can generally be understood by native speakers who are unaccustomed to dealing with non-natives.
    • Writing: Students are able to meet all practical writing needs and write narrative, descriptive, and expository passages related to work and/or school experiences. They can express their ideas in all major timeframes using proper vocabulary, grammar, and writing styles when writing about everyday events and situations. Their writing is generally comprehensible to natives not used to the writing of non-natives. 
    • Listening: Students are able to understand simple sentence-length speech in basic personal and social contexts with ease and confidence. They can derive substantial meaning or main points from some connected texts. 
    • Reading: Students are able to understand fully and with ease short, non-complex texts that convey basic information and deal with personal and social topics as well as some connected texts featuring description and narration. They can derive substantial meaning and main points and understand supporting details from more advanced, connected texts. 
  2. Intercultural Competence: Students can demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the target cultures and their products. By the time they graduate from our program, they will be able to:
    • Recognize and describe the historical, social, economic, and political events/forces that shape society in the target culture.
    • Analyze and critique the products of the target culture (film, literature, art, popular culture, media, etc.) within their context, including conducting basic research tasks. 
    • Examine the validity of one’s own cultural beliefs, behaviors and norms by contrasting and comparing them with those of the target culture. 
    • Perceive and value cultural diversity and reinterpret the place of the self as an identity culturally situated in the global context.

Language Teacher Training Program

Students preparing to teach should consult the catalog listing of the Department of Teaching and Learning for certification requirements and for teaching majors and minors. Those who intend to major in foreign languages and education should begin the study of the major language in the first year and of the minor language, if any, not later than the beginning of the second year. Students are also required to take FOR LANG 440.  Teacher training is available in the language programs of French and Spanish.

Bachelor of Arts in Humanities

This degree promotes an integrative, cross-disciplinary approach and allows students to work as full partners in the design of their program of studies. It is appropriate for students who have varied interests that may cut across the usual departmental boundaries and who wish to play a role in deciding on a suitable curriculum of study where disciplines in the humanities and/or the arts are the primary components. The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities also offers additional program options in International Area Studies, Linguistics (See Dept. of English), and Religious Studies. These degrees are not identified with a specific subject-matter field on the diploma but it will be reflected in the transcript. Students interested in being admitted to this major should contact the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Center at Daggy 201, 509-335-8731, or the School. 

Learning Goals

The stated learning goals specify knowledge and skill appropriate to the humanities degree but may vary depending on the focus of the degree, as chosen by the student. In addition, the student's University experience in terms of assignments, course selection, classroom participation, internships, performances, community services, and service learning activities are considered, and outcomes are measured in terms of society and self; critical thinking and creativity; writing, listening and speaking skills; information literacy; quantitative and symbolic reasoning skills; and depth, breadth and application of knowledge.

  1. To expose students to a thorough and integrated study of humanities, cultures, histories, languages, arts, and other related disciplines, as appropriate to the student’s interest and the program of studies pursued, that will allow them to develop a diverse and transdisciplinary perspective and understanding. 
  2. To expose students to a diversity of ways to Integrate and synthesize knowledge from multiple sources.
  3. To help students develop means of expressing concepts, propositions, and beliefs in coherent, concise and technically correct forms appropriate to their disciplinary standards and professional goals.
  4. To help students think, react, and work in imaginative ways stimulated by a higher degree of disciplinary synergies that will promote transdisciplinary innovation, and divergent thinking.

Student Learning Outcomes

A student completing the General Studies - Humanities degree programs will be able to:

  1. Integrate learned skills and knowledge derived from their concentrations or areas of study, demonstrating depth, breadth, and the development of a transdisciplinary perspective in the humanities. 
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in using disciplinary-appropriate methods for research, critical analysis, creative work or professional performance. 
  3. Communicate conclusions, interpretations, and implications clearly, concisely, and effectively, both orally and in writing for different types of audiences.
  4. Articulate and apply values, principles, and ideals derived from an individual as well as integrated understanding of their areas of study that demonstrate awareness of current modes of expression and thought.

Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences

This degree promotes an integrative approach and allows students to work as full partners in the design of their program of studies. It is appropriate for students who have varied interests that may cut across the usual departmental boundaries and who wish to play a role in deciding on a suitable curriculum of study, where disciplines in the social sciences or related areas such as administrative studies or communications are primary components in the design of this degree. At WSU-Vancouver only the Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences also offers an option in Personnel Psychology/ Human Resources. The degree is not identified with a specific subject-matter field on the diploma but it will be reflected in the transcript. Students interested in being admitted to this major should contact the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Center at Daggy 201, 509-335-8731, or the School. 

Learning Goals

The stated learning goals specify knowledge and skill appropriate to the focus of the degree, based on the disciplines that conform the program of studies chosen by the student. In addition, the student's University experience in terms of assignments, course selection, classroom participation, internships, performances, community services, and service learning activities are considered, and outcomes are measured in terms of society and self; critical thinking and creativity; writing, listening and speaking skills; information literacy; quantitative and symbolic reasoning skills; and depth, breadth and application of knowledge.

  1. To expose students to a thorough and integrated study of social sciences and related disciplines identified by the student’s interests that will allow them to develop a diverse and transdisciplinary perspective and understanding.
  2. To expose students to a diversity of ways to integrate and synthesize knowledge from multiple sources.
  3. To help students develop means of expressing concepts, propositions, and beliefs in coherent, concise and technically correct forms appropriate to their professional goals.
  4. To help students think, react, and work in imaginative ways that will promote transdisciplinary innovation, and divergent thinking.

Student Learning Outcomes

A student completing the Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences degree program will be able to:

  1. Integrate learned skills and knowledge using multi-disciplinary perspectives from their concentrations or areas of study in the social sciences and related disciplines, demonstrating depth and breadth.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in using disciplinary-appropriate methods for critical analysis, and applied research, as well as engagement in professional performance.
  3. Communicate conclusions, interpretations, and implications clearly, concisely, and effectively, both orally and in writing for different types of audiences.
  4. Articulate and apply values, principles, and ideals derived from an individual as well as integrated understanding of their areas of study that demonstrate awareness of current societal challenges.

Additional Majors in Language for the Professions

Students who are admitted to a major may seek an additional major focusing on the professional application of a specific language. This additional major does not lead to a degree.  These additional majors - French for the Professions, German for the Professions, Japanese for the Professions, and Spanish for the Professions - offer skills-based, proficiency-oriented learning that prepares students to communicate in the target language in professional settings. The unique combination of applied foreign language instruction and in-depth study of the culture(s) in which the target language is spoken trains students to achieve a level of proficiency in the language that enables them to identify and analyze cultural traits and concepts relevant to those countries and communities. The distinctive focus of this curriculum, i.e. on both language proficiency and intercultural proficiency, provides students entering today’s increasingly global and diverse workplace with the communication skills necessary to work effectively within, between, and across different language communities. This will enhance marketability and options for employment and allow students to become effective global leaders and entrepreneurs.  

Learning Goals

To support and enhance the University’s stated goal of promoting global leadership, the School is in the unique position to provide WSU students with the communication skills and intercultural competence that will allow them to become engaged participants on a global scale in their chosen field. 

  1. Linguistic proficiency: Depending on the target language, students can demonstrate an Intermediate Mid-High level of proficiency (as defined in ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines) in the target language in speaking, writing, listening and reading.
  2. Intercultural competence: Students will demonstrate knowledge and understanding of other cultures and their norms as they relate to professional dealings. 

Student Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this program, students will be able to: 

  1. Recognize and describe the cultural forces (history, social values, economic practices, and politics) that shape the professional practices in the target culture. 
  2. Analyze and critique professional behaviors and practices (i.e., through the history of specific companies, case studies, or current events) within their disciplinary context, including conducting basic research tasks. 
  3. Examine one’s own behaviors and norms in the professional world by contrasting and comparing them with those of the target culture.
  4. Identify and value diversity as well as the place of the self as an identity culturally situated in the global context. 

GRADUATE STUDIES

Complete details on preparation for graduate study and graduate programs are available from the graduate studies advisor and on the school's website: slcr.wsu.edu.

Graduate Program in American Studies and Culture

The American Studies and Culture M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Washington State University offer interdisciplinary research training that aims to map structural inequalities and resistance movements in a U.S. and a global context.  Alumni go on to academic positions in a variety of institutions, bringing a critical, intersectional lens to the study of American cultural and social formations. With a core faculty in the fields of cultural, ethnic, gender, and citizenship studies, students drawn to the program have a strong interest in the scholarly study of and challenge to social inequalities, whether manifested in popular culture, immigration policies, gender-racial discrimination, or other contemporary or historical loci. The Program offers a broad array of intellectual possibilities for developing critical interventions in borderlands studies, the study of colonialism and empire, race and ethnic studies, gender, indigenous studies, sports studies, digital culture and media, film and television studies, and disability studies.

Mission

The Graduate Program in American Studies and Culture seeks to prepare professional educators to engage in critical scholarship and public dialogue about culture locally, nationally, and globally, with deep understanding that is situated historically and in the contemporary period.

Program Goals

  • To train students in the field of American studies and culture for a broad, critical, and interdisciplinary knowledge of cultural formations, historically, in the contemporary period, and in global context.
  • To equip students to engage in scholarly and public dialogue about American culture.
  • To prepare graduates to be effective teachers in the field of American Studies and Culture and an interdisciplinary sub-specialization of their choice.

Student Learning Outcomes

By the end of this program, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate broad, critical, and interdisciplinary knowledge of American culture, (i.e., historically, in the contemporary period, in global context).
  2. Synthesize knowledge from several disciplinary perspectives.
  3. Think critically about limits of disciplinary knowledge domains.
  4. Analyze documentary (primary source) evidence from written, visual, and oral genres.
  5. Identify and employ primary and secondary source materials located through library and online scholarly research tools.
  6. Design and complete original research in the discipline and an interdisciplinary area of specialization.
  7. Write clear, publishable analytic prose scholarship.
  8. Contribute critically to professional and to public conversations.
  9. Teach undergraduate curriculum effectively

Admission is competitive and qualifying graduate students can be financially supported by teaching assistantships.

 




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Chinese Language and Culture (120 Credits)

A minimum of 34 credits beyond the 203 level (or the equivalent level in competence) in the major language is required for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Foreign Languages and Cultures. CHINESE 101, 102, and 203 do not count toward the major. Students who place into 102 and receive a B or better qualify for an additional 4 departmental advanced placement credits; students placing into 203 or above and receiving a B or better qualify for 8 departmental advanced placement credits. A maximum of 8 departmental AP credits is possible. See school for details.

Majors must complete either a minor in a second foreign language, a concentration of at least 16 credits in a related field, or a second major.

Students are admitted to the Chinese major upon making their intentions known to the School of Languages, Cultures and Race. However, no course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted toward the major. 300-400-level courses taken pass, fail may not be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor.

Majors and prospective majors are strongly encouraged to spend at least one semester abroad, living in the target culture and enhancing their fluency. Many accredited study abroad programs are available; students should work with their advisers in the selection of a program.

Of the 34 credits required for the major, a minimum of 15 must be taken in residence with 6 of these credits at the 400 level. A maximum of 12 credits per semester or 18 credits per year earned in a study abroad program may be applied toward the major. Credits for CHINESE 105, 205, 305, and 405 may not be applied toward the major.

All majors must complete an exit proficiency examination during the semester in which they complete the last language course of their major. There is a fee charged for the exam.
First Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
CHINESE 101, 102, 203 or Elective4
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
FOR LANG 101, 110, 120, 130, or 2203
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN] 3
Second TermCredits
CHINESE 102, 203 or Elective 14
CHINESE 111, 120, 121, or 1313
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Second Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab24
CHINESE 203 or Elective14
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Electives34
Second TermCredits
CHINESE 204 or 3073
CHINESE 311 [M], 320 [M], 321[M], or 330 [M]3
Humanities [HUM]3
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab24
Electives33
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
CHINESE 306, 307, or 3083
CHINESE 361, 363, 364, or 4503
Chinese Area Studies Elective43
Diversity [DIVR]3
Elective33
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
CHINESE 306, 307, or 3083
300-400-level Electives33
Electives36
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
CHINESE 306, 307, or 3083
Chinese Area Studies Elective43
300-400-level Electives39
Second TermCredits
CHINESE 361, 363, 364, or 4503
Chinese Area Studies Elective43
Integrative Capstone [CAPS]3
300-400-level Electives36
Exit Proficiency Exam

Footnotes
1Student must meet proficiency requirement to enroll in CHINESE 204. Study abroad in an immersion program in China or Taiwan is strongly recommended.
2To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
3Electives must be represented by an approved university minor in a second foreign language; 16 credits in a concentrated related field; or a second major in another field. Electives should include sufficient 300-400 level coursework to meet University requirement of 40 upper division credits.
4Chinese Area Studies (9 credits): Approved courses include ASIA 302 [M], 314, 315 [M], 476 [M], CES 314 [M], 315 [M], and POL S 333, or as approved by advisor. University requirements include a total of two [M] courses.

Comparative Ethnic Studies (120 Credits)

The BA in Comparative Ethnic Studies offers a unique opportunity to study the social, economic, and political forces that have shaped the historic experience of diverse ethnic communities in the United States over the past 500 years and that continue to determine our future. CES embraces interdisciplinary, comparative, and transnational approaches to studying race relations and the intersectionality of race, gender, class, sexuality, and globalization. The program offers a major and two minors; it is preparatory for careers and future study in teaching, social work, law school, community development and nonprofit work.

Students must complete a minimum of 36 credits in the major, as outlined in the program of studies. An overall 2.0 major GPA is required. A list of approved CES Sub-core and CES Electives are outlined below. Students must also satisfy the UCORE, College of Arts and Sciences graduation requirements, and take at least 40 of the total 120 semester credits in 300 – 400 level courses. Students are admitted to the Comparative Ethnic Studies major upon making their intentions known to the School of Languages, Cultures, and Race.
First Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
CES 201 3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3 or 4
Second TermCredits
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
Diversity [DIVR]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Electives3
Second Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab14
CES Elective 23
Foreign Language and/or Electives6
Humanities [HUM]3
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
CES Elective23
Foreign Language and/or Electives6
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab14
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
CES 301 [M]3
300-400-level CES Elective23
CES Sub-core36
Electives4
Second TermCredits
CES Sub-core33
300-400-level CES Electives26
300-400-level Electives6
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
300-400-level CES Elective23
Electives12
Second TermCredits
CES 489 [CAPS]3
300-400-level Electives12

Footnotes
1To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
2CES Electives: 18 credits including 12 credits of 300-400-level course work. CES Electives and sub-core must include course work to meet the University requirement of 2 [M] courses. Approved courses include AMER ST 475; CES 111, 131, 151, 171, 209, 220, 240, 244, 254, 255, 260, 271, 280, 308, 313, 314 [M], 325, 331, 332 [M], 335, 336, 338, 353 [M], 357, 358 [M], 373 [M], 379, 380, 405, 406, 407, 413, 426, 440, 444, 446, 454, 465, 470, 491 [M]; CES 372/ANTH 312; CES /WGSS 411.
3CES Sub-core courses are (9 Credits): CES 301 [M], 325, 440, 446, and 491 [M]. CES Sub-core and Electives must include coursework to meet University requirement of 2 [M] courses.

French (120 Credits)

A minimum of 34 credits beyond the 203 level (or the equivalent level in competence) in the major language is required for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Foreign Languages and Cultures. FRENCH 101, 102, and 203 do not count toward the major. Students who place into 102 and receive a B or better qualify for an additional 4 departmental advanced placement credits; students placing into 203 or above and receiving a B or better qualify for 8 departmental advanced placement credits. A maximum of 8 departmental AP credits is possible. See school for details.

Majors must complete either a minor in a second foreign language, a concentration of at least 16 credits in a related field, or a second major.

Students are admitted to the French major upon making their intentions known to the School of Languages, Cultures and Race. However, no course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted toward the major. 300-400-level courses taken pass, fail may not be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor.

Majors and prospective majors are strongly encouraged to spend at least one semester abroad, living in the target culture and enhancing their fluency. Many accredited study abroad programs are available; students should work with their advisers in the selection of a program.

Of the 34 credits required for the major, a minimum of 15 must be taken in residence with 6 of these credits at the 400 level. A maximum of 12 credits per semester or 18 credits per year earned in a study abroad program may be applied toward the major. Credits for FRENCH 105, 205, 305, and 405 may not be applied toward the major.

All majors must complete an exit proficiency examination during the semester in which they complete the last language course of their major. There is a fee charged for the exam.
First Year
First TermCredits
FOR LANG 101 [DIVR], 110 [DIVR], 120 [DIVR], or 220 [DIVR]3
FRENCH 101, 102, 203, or Elective14
FRENCH 105 or Elective1
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
SLCR Culture Course23
Second TermCredits
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
FRENCH 102, 203, or Elective14
FRENCH 105 or Elective1
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN] 3
SLCR Culture Course23
Second Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab34
FRENCH 203 or Elective14
FRENCH 205 or Elective1
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Electives43
Second TermCredits
FRENCH 110 [HUM] or 120 [HUM]3
FRENCH 2044
FRENCH 205 or Elective1
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab34
Electives43
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
FRENCH 305 or Elective1
FRENCH 306, 307, or 308 [M]3
FRENCH 361 [COMM]3
Electives 49
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
FRENCH 305 or Elective1
FRENCH 306, 307, or 308 [M]3
FRENCH 320 [HUM]3
Electives44
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
FRENCH 306, 307, or 308 [M]3
FRENCH 310 or 410 [CAPS]3
FRENCH 405 or Elective1
Electives49
Second TermCredits
FRENCH 350 or 450 [M]3
FRENCH 405 or Elective1
FRENCH 408 [M]3
FRENCH 420 [CAPS]3
Electives46
Exit Proficiency Exam

Footnotes
1Student must meet proficiency requirement to enroll in FRENCH 204.
2SLCR Culture Course (6 credits): Choose from CHINESE 111, 120, 121, 131; GERMAN 110, 120; SPANISH 110, 111, 120, 121; JAPANESE 120, or 123.
3To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
4Electives must be represented by an approved university minor in a second foreign language; 16 credits in a concentrated related field; or a second major in another field. Electives should include sufficient 300-400 level coursework to meet University requirement of 40 upper division credits.

French - Secondary Education (120 Credits)

Students who wish to earn a teaching credential must apply to the Teacher Preparation Program in the College of Education. They should consult with an advisor in Teaching and Learning regarding the education requirements and with an advisor in French regarding the French requirements.

To be admitted to the French Teaching option, a student must have earned at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA. A grade of C or better is required in all French courses to fulfill the requirement of this degree.

FRENCH 101 and 102 do not count toward the major, but students must complete these courses or show equivalent proficiency to enroll in FRENCH 203.

Departmental advanced placement credits: Students who place into 102 and receive a B or better qualify for an additional 4 departmental advanced placement credits; students placing into 203 or above and receiving a B or better qualify for 8 departmental advanced placement credits. A maximum of 8 departmental AP credits is possible. See school for details.

No course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted towards the major. 300-400-level courses taken pass, fail may not be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor.

Teaching majors are strongly encouraged to spend at least a summer abroad, living in the target culture and enhancing their fluency. Many accredited study abroad programs are available. Students should work with their advisors in the selection of a program or if wanting to consider alternate options to the study abroad requirement

Of the 32 FRENCH credits required for the teaching major, a minimum of 15 must be taken in residence with 6 of these credits at the 400 level. A maximum of 12 credits per semester or 18 credits per academic or calendar year earned in a study abroad program may be applied toward the teaching major. Credits for FRENCH 105, 205, 305, and 405 may not be applied toward the major or minor.

All teaching majors must complete an exit proficiency examination during the semester in which they complete the last language course of their major. There is a fee charged for the exam.
First Year
First TermCredits
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
FOR LANG 101 [DIVR] or 110 [DIVR]3
FRENCH 120 [HUM]3
FRENCH 20314
FRENCH 205 or Elective21
Second TermCredits
ENGLISH 201 [WRTG]3
FRENCH 204 4
FRENCH 205 or Elective 21
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3
Second Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab34
FRENCH 306, 307, or 308 [M]3
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Electives3
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
FRENCH 306, 307, or 308 [M]3
FRENCH 310, 320 [M], 350, or 3613
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab34
TCH LRN 3013
Apply for certification into the Secondary Teacher Certificate Program
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third TermCredits
TCH LRN 317 Initial Practicum Experience (Summer)2
Third Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
FOR LANG 4403
FRENCH 306, 307, or 308 [M]3
FRENCH 310, 320 [M], 350, or 3613
Second TermCredits
FRENCH 408 [M]3
TCH LRN 4643
TCH LRN 4653
TCH LRN 4663
Third TermCredits
FOR LANG 380, 480, or 495 (Summer abroad or internship in Francophone country)46
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ED PSYCH 4683
FRENCH 420 [CAPS]3
TCH LRN 4673
TCH LRN 4693
TCH LRN 4703
Complete FL proficiency Exit Exam
Pass Designated World Language WEST-E and American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) at the advance-low level
Second TermCredits
TCH LRN 415 Student Teaching16

Footnotes
1Student must meet proficiency requirement to enroll in FRENCH 203.
2FRENCH 205 is not required for degree. Students who do not take FRENCH 205 may need elective credits to meet University graduation requirement of 120 credits.
3To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
4The summer abroad or internship in Francophone country requirement may be satisfied by taking two additional upper division WSU FRENCH courses not used to fulfill other major requirements.

Humanities - International Area Studies Major (120 Credits) (0 Credits)

S. Davis, Coordinator

The BA in Humanities - International Area Studies major is for students who have interests that are both international and interdisciplinary. Students may choose between these major concentrations: Latin America Area Studies, German Area Studies, French and Francophone Area Studies, and European Area Studies. (Please note that Asian Area Studies is described in the Asian Program section of the catalog). Students who wish to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities with a focus in International Area Studies will devise an approved, coherent program of study with the coordinator and a designated advisor who is a specialist in the student's area of interest. The program of study must fulfill an academic or career goal, include prerequisites consistent with the 300-400-level major coursework, satisfy the UCORE requirements and any additional requirements for the College of Arts and Sciences, and include language proficiency appropriate to the cultural area. The area studies major will consist of a minimum of 40 credits. No course in which C- or lower is earned will be counted toward the major. More details are available on the websites of WSU, the General Studies program, and the School of Languages, Cultures, and Race, at https://slcr.wsu.edu/.

Humanities - Religious Studies Major (120 Credits)

M. W. Myers, Coordinator

The BA in Humanities - Religious Studies major is a cross-disciplinary program designed for students who wish to develop an understanding of the nature of religion and its role in individual and social life. The program enables students to analyze critically and evaluate western and non-western religions without a predisposition to defend or reject the claims of any particular faith. The program offers both a major and a minor; it is preparatory for careers and future study in international affairs, arts, humanities, social sciences, and intercultural studies. Students who major in religious studies will earn a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities degree.

Students are admitted to the BA in Humanities – Religious Studies major upon making their intentions known to the School of Languages, Cultures, and Race.

A student may earn a major in Religious Studies by completing 39 credits of work from among the designated courses in the several departments involved. Of these 39 credits, 12 must consist of the core courses specified below for all majors. Further courses are specified as required or elective depending on the student’s focus: western religions, non-western religions, or comparative religions. There is also a language requirement.

A student must also satisfy the UCORE and College of Arts and Sciences graduation requirements and take at least 40 of the total 120 credits in 300-400-level courses. For a minor in Religious Studies, a student must take at least 18 credits of work, including the core (minus the Seminar in Religious Studies) and three courses from the required list of comparative religion. Religious Studies also makes an ideal second major.
First Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab14
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
Foreign Language24
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3
Second TermCredits
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
Foreign Language 24
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
HUM 103 [HUM]3
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab14
Second Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Foreign Language or Elective24
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Second TermCredits
Diversity [DIVR]3
Foreign Language or Elective24
PHIL 2073
Elective Core33
Electives3
Complete Writing Portfolio
--------------------------------------------------------
THIRD and FOURTH Years [See “OPTIONS” below]60

Footnotes
1To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
2Students with two years high school foreign language are required to complete 2 additional semesters. Students without high school foreign language are required to complete 4 semesters.
3Elective Core courses: FOR LANG 102, HUMANITY 101, or HUMANITY 335.

OPTIONS

Third and Fourth Years — Students must complete one of the following options. Options and Elective coursework must reflect University requirements of 120 total credits, 40 credits of 300-400-level coursework, two [M] courses, and a [CAPS] course.

  1. Western Religions: HISTORY 272, 445, PHIL 407, and seven courses from: ANTH 330, ENGLISH 305, 306, 485, FINE ART 201, 202, HISTORY 341, 423, 440, 441, HUMANITY 101, 302 [M], PHIL 320, 322, 413, 420, or 446.
  2. Non-Western Religions: HISTORY 273, PHIL 314 [M], 315 [M], 407, and six courses from: ANTH 303, 330, FINE ART 201, 202, 302 [M], HISTORY 270, 275, 308, 370, 373, 374, 472 [M], 473, or HUMANITY 350.
  3. Comparative Religions: HISTORY 273, 407, 445, PHIL 314 [M], 315 [M], and five courses from: ANTH 303, ENGLISH 305, 306, 483, 485, FINE ART 201, 202, 302 [M]; HISTORY 308, 341, 370, 373, 374, 440, 441, 472 [M], 473, or HUMANITY 350.

Japanese (120 Credits)

A minimum of 34 credits beyond the 203 level (or the equivalent level in competence) in the major language is required for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Foreign Languages and Cultures. 101, 102, and 203 do not count toward the major. Students who place into 102 and receive a B or better qualify for an additional 4 departmental advanced placement credits; students placing into 203 or above and receiving a B or better qualify for 8 departmental advanced placement credits. A maximum of 8 departmental AP credits is possible. See school for details.

Majors must complete either a minor in a second foreign language, a concentration of at least 16 credits in a related field, or a second major.

Students are admitted to the Japanese major upon making their intentions known to the School of Languages, Cultures and Race. However, no course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted toward the major. 300-400-level courses taken pass, fail may not be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor.

Majors and prospective majors are strongly encouraged to spend at least one semester abroad, living in the target culture and enhancing their fluency. Many accredited study abroad programs are available; students should work with their advisers in the selection of a program.

Of the 34 credits required for the major, a minimum of 15 must be taken in residence with 6 of these credits at the 400 level. A maximum of 12 credits per semester or 18 credits per year earned in a study abroad program may be applied toward the major. Credits for 105, 205, 305, 405 may not be applied toward the major.

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.

All majors must complete an exit proficiency examination during the semester in which they complete the last language course of their major. There is a fee charged for the exam.
First Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab14
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
FOR LANG 101, 110, 120, 130, or 2203
JAPANESE 101, 102, 203, or Elective 24
JAPANESE 105 or Elective1
Second TermCredits
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
JAPANESE 102, 203, or Elective24
JAPANESE 111, 120, 123, or 1313
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3
Electives33
Second Year
First TermCredits
JAPANESE 203 or Elective24
JAPANESE 205 or Elective1
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab14
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Electives33
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
Humanities [HUM]3
JAPANESE 204 4
JAPANESE 205 or Elective1
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
Area Studies Courses 43
ASIA 330 [M], CHINESE 311 [M], JAPANESE 320 [M], or JAPANESE 322 [DIVR]53
JAPANESE 306, 307, 308, or 3613
Electives36
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
ASIA 330 [M], CHINESE 311 [M], JAPANESE 320 [M], or JAPANESE 322 [DIVR]53
FOR LANG 440 if teaching major or Electives4
JAPANESE 305 or Elective1
JAPANESE 306, 307, 308, or 3613
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ASIA 330 [M], CHINESE 311 [M], JAPANESE 320 [M], or JAPANESE 322 [DIVR]53
FOR LANG 441 if teaching major or 300-400-level Electives63
JAPANESE 305 or Elective1
JAPANESE 306, 307, 308, or 3613
Electives66
Second TermCredits
Area Studies Courses 43
Integrative Capstone [CAPS]3
Electives 69
Language Proficiency Exam

Footnotes
1To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
2Student must meet proficiency requirement to enroll in JAPANESE 204.
3Electives must be represented by an approved university minor in a second foreign language; 16 credits in a concentrated related field; or a second major in another field. Electives should include sufficient 300-400 level coursework to meet University requirement of 40 upper division credits.
4Area Studies courses: Students must take 6 credits in Japanese-related courses from CES 313, 314, 315, 411, and 413; ASIA 275, 374, 387, 477, and 479; FINE ART 302; PHIL 314 and 315; or as approved by advisor.
5Students who do not take JAPANESE 322 must take another course to fulfill University Diversity [DIVR] requirement.
6Electives may need to include up to 6 credits of major coursework at the 400-level to meet the major requirement. Approved courses are JAPANESE courses and Area Studies courses, or as approved by advisor. The University requires a minimum of 40 credits of 300-400-level coursework.

Social Sciences Major - Personnel Psychology/Human Resources Option (Vancouver-only) (120 Credits)



The Personnel Psychology/Human Resources (PP/HR) option for the BA in Social Sciences - Social Sciences major is designed to provide human resource professionals, and those preparing for a career in human resources, the tools to be effective managers. 120 credit hours are required, including completion of WSU UCORE requirements, CAS requirements, and a combination of social sciences courses totaling 40 upper-division hours from three academic areas (psychology, human development, and management). The GPA for the 40 hours must be a 2.00 minimum. Students declare the General Social Sciences major (Gen S) and receive a Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences with an Option in Personnel Psychology/Human Resources.

First Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab14
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
Humanities [HUM]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab14
Second Year
First TermCredits
PSYCH 3063
Foreign Language, if necessary, and/or Electives12
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Diversity [DIVR]3
PSYCH 3083
Foreign Language, if necessary, and/or Electives6
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
H D 4063
MGMT 3013
PSYCH 3114
Area 1 Electives 23
Electives3
Second TermCredits
Area 1 Electives 23
Area 2 Electives 33
Area 3 Electives 43
Electives6
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
Area 1 Electives 23
Area 2 Electives 33
Area 3 Electives 43
Electives6
Second TermCredits
Integrative Capstone [CAPS]3
Area 3 Electives 43
Electives9

Footnotes
1To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
2Area 1 electives: PSYCH 309, 350, 412, 470, or 495.
3Area 2 electives: H D 301, 350, 385, 403, or 430.
4Area 3 electives: I BUS 453 [M], MGMT 401 [M], 450, 455, 456 [M], 485 [M], 487, 496. Must include two [M] courses.

Social Sciences or Humanities Major - Plan A Option (120 Credits)

A. Chow, Coordinator

This division of general studies is for students whose primary interest in the humanities or social sciences requires programs and course selections which are not possible within single academic units or established curricula. Students who wish to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities or a Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences will devise an approved, coherent program of study which fulfills an academic or career goal and includes prerequisites consistent with the 300-400-level course work. In addition, each student will satisfy the UCOREs and any additional requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.

Students are admitted to the General Humanities major (Gen H) or General Social Sciences major (Gen S) upon making their intentions known to the School of Languages, Cultures, and Race.

Plan A—Primary/Secondary Concentration
Primary concentration: a minimum of 24 credits, including at least 15 300-400-level credits, must be completed in a single humanities or social sciences department or published program with a minimum 2.00 primary concentration GPA. The degree (Gen H or Gen S) will depend on the primary concentration.

Secondary concentration: a minimum of 15 credits, including at least 6 300-400-level credits, must be completed in another academic department, program or area published in the catalog with a minimum 2.00 GPA.

Per Academic Regulation 54, students may not be admitted in or awarded an additional major or minor if it carries the same name as one of the areas of study or options, concentrations or sub-plans within a major. In addition, students pursuing a Business major or minor may not also be admitted in an option, concentration or subplan of Administrative Studies.

For a list of approved Plan A areas, please contact the Liberal Arts General Studies office.
First Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab14
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
Humanities [HUM]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3
Second TermCredits
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab14
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Foreign Language, if necessary, or Elective3 or 4
Second Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Primary Concentration3
Secondary Concentration3
Foreign Language, if necessary, and/or Elective6
Second TermCredits
Diversity [DIVR]3
Primary Concentration3
Secondary Concentration3
Electives4
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
300-400-level Primary Concentration23
Primary Concentration3
Secondary Concentration3
Electives6
Second TermCredits
300-400-level Primary Concentration23
300-400-level Secondary Concentration23
Integrative Capstone [CAPS]3
Electives6
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
300-400-level Primary Concentration26
300-400-level Secondary Concentration23
Electives26
Second TermCredits
300-400-level Primary Concentration23
Electives212

Footnotes
1To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
2Students must take a total of 40 credits of upper-division (300-400 level). 21 upper-division credits must be taken within the designated concentration areas. The UCORE requirements include 3 upper-division credits. The remaining 16 credits may be taken in the electives, the UCOREs, or by electing to take more than the minimum required in the areas. Among the 300-400 level course work in the areas, two courses, each at 3 credits, must have a [M] designation. Only 6 credits of internship or P, F credits are allowed to count towards major requirements.

Social Sciences or Humanities Major - Plan B Option (120 Credits)

A. Chow, Coordinator

Humanities: A combination of humanities courses totaling at least 39 credits involving three academic areas with a minimum of 9 credits in each of the three areas. At least 21 of the 39 credits must be at the 300-400-level and the GPA for the 39 credits must be a 2.0 minimum. Students are admitted to the General Humanities major (Gen H) upon making their intentions known to the School of Languages, Cultures, and Race, and receive a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities.

Social Sciences: A combination of social sciences courses totaling at least 39 credits involving three academic areas with a minimum of 9 credits in each of the three areas. At least 21 of the 39 credits must be at the 300-400-level and the GPA for the 39 credits must be a 2.0 minimum. Students are admitted to the General Social Sciences major (Gen S) upon making their intentions known to the School of Languages, Cultures, and Race, and receive a Bachelor of Arts in Social Sciences.

Per Academic Regulation 54, students may not be admitted in or awarded an additional major or minor if it carries the same name as one of the areas of study or options, concentrations or sub-plans within a major. In addition, students pursuing a Business major or minor may not also be admitted in an option, concentration or subplan of Administrative Studies.

For a list of approved Plan B areas, please contact the Liberal Arts General Studies office.
First Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab14
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Humanities [HUM]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3
Second TermCredits
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab14
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Electives3
Second Year
First TermCredits
Area 13
Area 23
Foreign Language, if necessary, and/or Electives7
Second TermCredits
Area 13
Area 33
Diversity [DIVR]3
Foreign Language, if necessary, and/or Electives6
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
300-400-level Area 123
Area 23
Area 33
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
Electives3
Second TermCredits
300-400-level Area 223
300-400-level Area 323
Integrative Capstone [CAPS]3
Electives6
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
300-400 Any Area29
Electives26
Second TermCredits
300-400 Any Area23
Electives212

Footnotes
1To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
2Students must take a total of 40 credits of upper-division (300-400 level). 21 upper-division credits must be taken within the designated concentration areas. The UCORE requirements include 3 upper-division credits. The remaining 16 credits may be taken in the electives, the UCOREs, or by electing to take more than the minimum required in the areas. Among the 300-400 level course work in the areas, two courses, each at 3 credits, must have a [M] designation. Only 6 credits of internship or P, F credits are allowed to count towards major requirements.

Spanish (120 Credits)

A minimum of 34 credits beyond the 203 level (or the equivalent level in competence) in the major language is required for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Foreign Languages and Cultures. SPANISH 101, 102, and 203 do not count toward the major. Students who place into 102 and receive a B or better qualify for an additional 4 departmental advanced placement credits; students placing into 203 or above and receiving a B or better qualify for 8 departmental advanced placement credits. A maximum of 8 departmental AP credits is possible. See school for details.

Majors must complete either a minor in a second foreign language, a concentration of at least 16 credits in a related field, or a second major.

Students are admitted to the Spanish major upon making their intentions known to the School of Languages, Cultures and Race. However, no course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted toward the major. 300-400-level courses taken pass, fail may not be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor.

Majors and prospective majors are strongly encouraged to spend at least one semester abroad, living in the target culture and enhancing their fluency. Many accredited study abroad programs are available; students should work with their advisers in the selection of a program.

Of the 34 credits required for the major, a minimum of 15 must be taken in residence with 6 of these credits at the 400 level. A maximum of 12 credits per semester or 18 credits per year earned in a study abroad program may be applied toward the major. Credits for SPANISH 105, 205, 305, and 405 may not be applied toward the major.

All majors must complete an exit proficiency examination during the semester in which they complete the last language course of their major. There is a fee charged for the exam.
First Year
First TermCredits
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
FOR LANG 101, 110, 120, 130, or 2203
MATH 103 (if needed) or Electives13
SPANISH 101, 102, 203 or Elective24
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3
SPANISH 102, 203 or Elective 24
SPANISH 105 or Elective1
Second Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab34
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
SPANISH 203 or Elective 24
SPANISH 205 or Elective1
Electives13
Second TermCredits
Humanities [HUM]3
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab34
SPANISH 2044
SPANISH 205 or Elective1
Electives14
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
Diversity [DIVR]3
SPANISH 3063
SPANISH 3073
SPANISH Film/Literature/Culture Elective43
Electives or FOR LANG 440 if teaching major13
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
SPANISH 305 or elective1
SPANISH 3083
SPANISH Film/Literature/Culture Elective43
300-400-level Electives15
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
SPANISH 4073
SPANISH 450 [M], 451 [M], 452 [M], or 453 [M]3
Electives19
Second TermCredits
Integrative Capstone [CAPS]3
SPANISH 305 or elective1
SPANISH 408 [M]3
SPANISH 450 [M], 451 [M], 452 [M], or 453 [M]3
300-400-level Electives14
Exit Proficiency Exam

Footnotes
1Electives must be represented by a competence in a second foreign language up to and including 204; an approved university minor or a teaching minor; or a second major in another field.
2Student must meet proficiency requirement to enroll in SPANISH 204.
3To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
4Approved SPANISH Film/Literature/Culture Electives include (two courses): SPANISH 310, 311, 320, 321, 350, 351, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, or as approved by advisor.

Spanish - Secondary Education (120 Credits)

Students who wish to earn a teaching credential must apply to the Teacher Preparation Program in the College of Education. They should consult with an advisor in Teaching and Learning regarding the education requirements and with an advisor in SPANISH regarding the Spanish requirements.

To be admitted to the Spanish Teaching option, a student must have earned at least a 2.50 cumulative GPA. A grade of C or better is required in all SPANISH courses to fulfill the requirement of this degree.

SPANISH 101 and 102 do not count toward the major, but students must complete these courses or show equivalent proficiency to enroll in SPANISH 203.

Departmental advance placement credits: Students who place into 102 and receive a B or better qualify for an additional 4 departmental advanced placement credits; students placing into 203 or above and receiving a B or better qualify for 8 departmental advanced placement credits. A maximum of 8 departmental AP credits is possible. See school for details.

No course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted toward the major. 300-400-level courses taken pass, fail may not be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor.

Teaching majors are strongly encouraged to spend at least a summer abroad, living in the target culture and enhancing their fluency. Many accredited study abroad programs are available. Students should work with their advisors in the selection of a program or if wanting to consider alternate options to the study abroad requirement.

Of the 35 SPANISH credits required for the teaching major, a minimum of 15 must be taken in residence at WSU with 6 of these credits at the 400 level. A maximum of 12 credits per semester or 18 credits per academic or calendar year earned in a study abroad program may be applied toward the teaching major. Credits for SPANISH 105, 205, 305, and 405 may not be applied toward the major.

All teaching majors must complete an exit proficiency examination during the semester in which they complete the last language course of their major. There is a fee charged for the exam.
First Year
First TermCredits
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
FOR LANG 101 [DIVR] or 110 [DIVR]3
SPANISH 120 [HUM]3
SPANISH 20314
SPANISH 205 or Elective21
Second TermCredits
ENGLISH 201 [WRTG]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]3
SPANISH 2044
SPANISH 205 or Elective21
Second Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] with lab34
Social Sciences [SSCI]3
SPANISH 3063
SPANISH 3083
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
Physical Sciences [PSCI] with lab34
SPANISH 3073
SPANISH Film/Literature/Culture Elective43
TCH LRN 3013
Apply for certification into the Secondary Teacher Certificate Program
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third TermCredits
TCH LRN 317 Initial Practicum Experience (Summer)2
Third Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS], Humanities [HUM], or Social Sciences [SSCI]3
FOR LANG 4403
SPANISH 407 or 408 [M]3
SPANISH 450 [M], 451 [M], 452 [M], or 453 [M]3
SPANISH Film/Literature/Culture Elective43
Second TermCredits
SPANISH 407 or 408 [M]3
SPANISH 450 [M], 451 [M], 452 [M], or 453 [M]3
TCH LRN 4643
TCH LRN 4653
TCH LRN 4663
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ED PSYCH 4683
SPANISH 420 [CAPS] or FOR LANG 410 [CAPS]3
TCH LRN 4673
TCH LRN 4693
TCH LRN 4703
Complete FL proficiency Exit Exam
Pass Designated World Language WEST-E and American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) at the advance-low level
Second TermCredits
TCH LRN 415 Student Teaching16

Footnotes
1Student must meet proficiency requirement to enroll in SPANISH 203.
2SPANISH 205 is not required for degree. Students who do not take SPANISH 205 may need elective credits to meet University graduation requirement of 120 credits.
3To meet University and College of Arts and Sciences requirements, students must take a [BSCI] course with lab and [PSCI] course with lab.
4SPANISH Film/Literature/Culture Electives: Approved courses include SPANISH 310, 311, 320, 321, 350, 351, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, or as approved by advisor.


Minors

Additional Major – French for the Professions

Students who are admitted in a major may seek an additional major in French for the Professions.  This additional major does not lead to a degree.  The additional major requires 38 credits, as follows:  1) Language Foundation (14 credits) -- FRENCH 101, 102, 203, and 261.  Note that most students entering WSU will have already fulfilled the equivalent of the 101 and 102 courses, if they choose to pursue the same foreign language for this major; 2) Intermediate Language (6 credits) -- Two courses from FRENCH 306, 307, or 308; 3) Language for Specific Purposes (6 credits) -- FRENCH 320 [HUM] and 361 [COMM]; and 4) Upper-level Experience (12 credits) -- FRENCH 420 [CAPS]; two Writing in the Major courses (see school); and FOR LANG 495, Internship / Service Learning / Undergraduate Research / Study Abroad (for 8 weeks minimum).  No course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted toward the additional major. No course taken pass/fail may be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor. The STAMP 4S (Standards-based Measurement of Proficiency) web-based assessment of foreign language proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening and will be taken during the semester in which the student is completing the final course for the major taught in the target language.


Additional Major – German for the Professions

Students who are admitted in a major may seek an additional major in German for the Professions. This additional major does not lead to a degree. The additional major requires 39 credits, as follows: 1) Language Foundation (15 credits) -- GERMAN 101, 102, 203, and 204. Note that most students entering WSU will have already fulfilled the equivalent of the 101 and 102 courses, if they choose to pursue the same foreign language for this major; 2) Intermediate Language (6 credits) -- GERMAN 307 and 308; 3) Language for Specific Purposes (6 credits) -- GERMAN 320 and 361 [COMM]; and 4) Upper-level Experience (12 credits) -- GERMAN 420 [CAPS]; two Writing in the Major courses (see school); and FOR LANG 495, Internship / Service Learning / Undergraduate Research / Study Abroad (for 8 weeks minimum). No course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted toward the additional major. No course taken pass/fail may be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor.  The STAMP 4S (Standards-based Measurement of Proficiency) web-based assessment of foreign language proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening and will be taken during the semester in which the student is completing the final course for the major taught in the target language.


Additional Major – Japanese for the Professions

Students who are admitted in a major may seek an additional major in Japanese for the Professions. This additional major does not lead to a degree. The additional major requires 37 credits, as follows: 1) Language Foundation (16 credits) -- JAPANESE 101, 102, 203, and 204; 2) Intermediate Language (9 credits) -- JAPANESE 306, 307, and 308; 3) Language for Specific Purposes (3 credits) -- JAPANESE 361; 4) Lower-level Culture/Literature course taught in English (3 credits) -- one from JAPANESE 111, 120, 123, and 131; 5) Upper-level Culture/Literature courses taught in English (6 credits) -- two from CHINESE 311, JAPANESE 320, JAPANESE 322, and ASIA 330; and 6) two Writing in the Major courses (see school). No course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted toward the additional major. No course taken pass/fail may be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor. The STAMP 4S (Standards-based Measurement of Proficiency) web-based assessment of foreign language proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening and will be taken during the semester in which the student is completing the final course for the major taught in the target language.


Additional Major – Spanish for the Professions

Students who are admitted in a major may seek an additional major in Spanish for the Professions. This additional major does not lead to a degree. The additional major requires 38 credits, as follows: 1) Language Foundation (14 credits) -- SPANISH 101, 102, 203, and 261. Note that most students entering WSU will have already fulfilled the equivalent of the 101 and 102 courses, if they choose to pursue the same foreign language for this major; 2) Intermediate Language (6 credits) -- Two courses from SPANISH 306, 307, or 308; 3) Language for Specific Purposes (6 credits) -- SPANISH 320  or 321 [DIVR]; and 361, 362, 363, 364, or 365; and 4) Upper-level Experience (12 credits) -- Integrative Capstone [CAPS]; two Writing in the Major courses (see school); and FOR LANG 495, Internship / Service Learning / Undergraduate Research / Study Abroad (for 8 weeks minimum). No course in which a C- or lower grade is earned will be counted toward the additional major. No course taken pass/fail may be included for credit toward the major. No course may be repeated for credit toward the major unless thus designated in the catalog. No course may count for both the major and the minor. The STAMP 4S (Standards-based Measurement of Proficiency) web-based assessment of foreign language proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening and will be taken during the semester in which the student is completing the final course for the major taught in the target language.


American Indian Studies

M. Holloman, Coordinator

The minor in American Indian Studies requires 18 semester hours which shall include a required 9 hour core (3 of the following 4 courses: ANTH 320, CES 171, HISTORY 308, or HISTORY 410) and 9 hours of electives (ANTH 327, 331, 334, 535, CES 372, 373, 379, 470, 475, FINE ART 301, HISTORY 410, or MUS 265). At least 9 of the credits must be taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses, and at least 9 hours must be at the 300-400 level. A minimum of 12 credits must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum GPA of 2.00 is required in the minor coursework.

 


Chinese, French, German, Japanese, or Spanish

To fulfill requirements for a minor in Chinese, French, German, Japanese, or Spanish, a student must complete a minimum of 17 credits of course work in one language area. A foundation of the target language, 203 and 204 (8 credits), is required. The remaining 9 credits must be 300-400-level course work in the target language, of which 3 credits must be taken in residence at WSU, while the remaining 6 credits must be taken either in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad, educational exchange courses, or equivalent transfer coursework. All courses must be passed with a grade of C or better. Only courses thus designated in the Catalog may be repeated for credit toward the minor. Courses counting towards a minor in the language may not be counted towards a major in International Area Studies (i.e., Asian Studies, Latin America Area Studies, German Area Studies, or French and Francophone Area Studies). 105, 205, 305, 405 may not count towards the minor. For courses taken in Study Abroad Programs or as other transfer credits, please check with your advisor. All Chinese, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish language minors must also complete an exit proficiency examination interview during the semester in which they complete the last language course of their minor.  There is a fee charged for the exam


Comparative Ethnic Studies

For the minor in Comparative Ethnic Studies (CES), students must complete either CES 101 or 201, as well as an additional 15 hours of coursework in CES, nine hours of which must be 300-400 level courses taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.


Film Studies

Ana M. Rodriguez-Vivaldi, (Faculty Coordinator) and L. Heustis (Advisor)
https://forlang.wsu.edu/academics/film-studies/
509-335-4136

The Film Studies Minor introduces students to the critical study of cinema and media studies.  It explores how cinema both reflects and influences the facts, ideas, and activities of any given society, and how film allows us to travel to most places in the world and become familiar with diverse cultures, traditions, and ways of thinking.  The film studies minor also teaches students how to discern the cinematic and narrative features that are used in cinematography and how culture can influence them. The study of film encourages critical thinking, respect for cultural diversity, and detailed knowledge of film as a text of facts and ideas. 

 

The minor’s program of studies is designed by the student in collaboration with the coordinator and /or the advisor.  A minimum of 18 credits is required and must include 9 hours of upper-division work taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. 9 credits must be chosen from COM 471, ENGLISH 150, 339, FOR LANG 110, 410, MUS 266, PHIL 210, and SOC 372 or 373. An additional 9 elective credits geared toward social, cultural, or applied skills are required. Approved courses include CES 222, 338, 358 [M], 379, CHINESE/ASIA/JAPANESE 111, CHINESE 311 [M], COM 210, COMJOUR 360, 390, 466, CRM J/POL S 381, DTC 335, 338, DTC/ENGLISH 336, 354, 355, DTC/AMER ST/ENGLISH 475, ENGLISH 205, 316, 340, 342, ENGLISH/FINE ART 337, FINE ART 333, 363, 380, 381, 385, 434, 435,  FRENCH 110, 310, 410, GERMAN 110, 310, HISTORY 400, MUS 162, RUSSIAN 410, SOC 373, SPANISH 110, 111, 310, 311, and WGSS 340. No more than two courses with the same subject (or content, as in cross-listed courses) may be applied towards the minor. All core courses must be taken at WSU. After consultation with the film studies coordinator or advisor, two elective courses may be transferred to the film studies minor from accredited study abroad and other university/college programs.  A maximum of 3 internship credits may count towards the minor’s electives.

 

Learning Goals  

  • To enhance knowledge of the history and practice of film production
  • To analyze the nature, history, and function of film in an interdisciplinary manner that broadens and enhances critical thought
  • To enhance the perception of and respect for the diversity of cultures in this country and around the world as exposed through this medium
  • To enhance technical understanding of how film and related-media work
  • To enhance understanding of the societal and cultural roles and impact of film and other media
  • To enhance media literacy skills

 


French Area and Culture Studies

A minimum of 16 credits is required (options in French or Francophone Studies). A foundation of the target language, French 203 (4 credits), is required; in addition, 4 courses (12 credits) of further knowledge must be taken other than 203 as: EITHER one lower level and two upper-level courses in FLC plus one approved course in another department; OR one lower-level and one upper-level course in FLC plus two approved courses in another department. See the school for a list of acceptable courses. For special requirements concerning French and Francophone options in the French Area Studies Minor, please see your advisor. A minimum of 9 credits with a letter grade must be taken in residency at WSU at the 300-400 level.  All courses must be passed with a grade of C or better. Only courses thus designated in the Catalog may be repeated for credit toward the minor. Courses counting towards a minor in the language may not be counted towards a major in International Area Studies (i.e., Latin America Area Studies, German Area Studies, French and Francophone Area Studies, or Russian Area Studies). 105, 205, and 305 may not count towards the minor. For courses taken in Study Abroad Programs or as other transfer credits, please check with your advisor.


French for Design and Merchandising

The minor in French for Design and Merchandising requires a minimum of 16 credits, 9 of which must be in 300-400-level courses taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. Required courses for the foundation of the target language include FRENCH 203 and FRENCH 204 or 261 (7-8 credits). An additional 3 courses (9 credits) must be selected from the following: FRENCH 361, FRENCH 362, and FRENCH 306 or FRENCH 320, or equivalent (if taken abroad). All courses must be passed with a grade of C or better. Courses counting towards this minor may not be counted toward a major in International Area Studies (i.e., French and Francophone Area Studies). FRENCH 105, 205, and 305 may not count towards this minor. For courses/course equivalencies taken in Study Abroad Programs or as other transfer credits, please check with your advisor. An exit proficiency examination is required and will be taken during the semester in which the student is completing the final target language course for the semester.


German Area and Culture Studies

A minimum of 16 credits is required. A foundation of the target language, GERMAN 203 (4 credits), is required; in addition, 4 courses (12 credits) of further knowledge must be taken other than 203 as: EITHER one lower level and two upper-level courses in FLC plus one approved course in another department; OR one lower-level and one upper-level course in FLC plus two approved courses in another department. See the school for a list of acceptable courses. A minimum of 9 credits with a letter grade must be taken in residency at WSU at the 300-400 level. All courses must be passed with a grade of C or better. Only courses thus designated in the Catalog may be repeated for credit toward the minor. Courses counting towards a minor in the language may not be counted towards a major in International Area Studies (i.e., Latin America Area Studies, German Area Studies, French and Francophone Area Studies, or Russian Area Studies). 105, 205, and 305 may not count towards the minor. For courses taken in Study Abroad Programs or as other transfer credits, please check with your advisor.


Global and Ethnic Narrative Traditions

A systematic approach to the study of a variety of regional myths, and global, ethnic, and racial narrative traditions in their original context as well as in more contemporary reinterpretations through literature and film and other cultural arenas, with the aim to challenge and resituate dominant views about race and ethnicity, gender, social classes, and different political practices. When we consider how contemporary writers, filmmakers, poets, playwrights, painters, music composers, and other cultural producers use the forms and elements of these storytelling practices we can more effectively analyze how these narratives have the power to articulate political ideas as well as social and cultural transformations. In this manner, the program develops our students’ critical thinking and encourages them to re-interpret the place of the self as an identity culturally situated. Narratives to be studied address specific topics related to gender (representations of women, men, homosexuality, etc.), age (representations of childhood, youth, the elderly, etc.), history (representations of war, revolutions, dictatorships, democratization, etc.), culture and society (gendered roles, race, nature, religion, social classes, immigration, etc.), to mention a few.
 
Completion of the minor requires 18 credits including a required core (6 credits) and 12 credits of electives. At least 9 credits of approved coursework must be taken at the 300-400 level. No courses taken Pass/Fail will count towards the 18-credit requirement.
 
Required courses (6 credits): Two course from CES/ENGLISH 220 or FOR LANG 130; FOR LANG 110 or 410; FOR LANG 120.
 
Elective courses (12 credits): Four courses from three categories below.
 
Category 1 - Literature and Mythology, 2 courses from:
ASIA/CHINESE/JAPANESE 131, CES 313/ENGLISH 311, CES/ENGLISH 314, CES 331/ENGLISH 321, CES 332/ENGLISH 322, CES 353/ENGLISH 345, CES 373/ENGLISH 341, FOR LANG 370, 371, 373, one from FRENCH 350 or 430, one from GERMAN 350 or 450 or 451 or 452, one from SPANISH 350 or 351 or 430 or 450 or 451 or 452.
 
Category 2 - Culture and Film, one course from:
ASIA/CHINESE/JAPANESE 111, ASIA/CHINESE 330, ASIA/JAPANESE 122, 123, CES 254, CHINESE 120, 121, 311, FRENCH 110, 120, 310, 320, 410, 420, GERMAN 110, 120, 310, 320, SPANISH 110, 111, 120, 121, 310, 311, 320, 321, 420.
 
Category 3 - History and Society, one course from:
CES 111, 131, 151, 171, 255, CES 211/HISTORY 201, CES/HISTORY 235. 
 
15 of the credits must be taken at WSU. A grade of C or better must be earned in each of the courses applied to the minor. No course may be repeated for credit. No more than 6 credits may apply toward completion of a different minor. Other courses may be added to the list of acceptable electives. To discuss any course equivalencies, please contact the minor coordinator.

Global Studies

A. M. Rodriguez-Vivaldi, (Faculty Coordinator) and L. Heustis (Advisor)
http://libarts.wsu.edu/genstudies/
509-335-0397

 

Global studies examine economic, political, social, cultural, and scientific practices in a transnational and cross-cultural perspective. The Global Studies minor is designed to provide students with an integrated exposure to globally related scholarship across the disciplines, and encourages a student in any major discipline to think in terms of the globalization that marks the contemporary world.  The program of study is designed to provide an exciting interdisciplinary global perspective on the arts, humanities, social sciences, and sciences.  The minor is flexible and complements majors from across the University, affording students the opportunity to reach beyond their majors, or to take courses related to their majors outside of the context of the United States.  

 

In order to be admitted to the minor, students must have completed at least 60 credits with a 2.0 GPA or above. To earn the minor, students must complete a minimum of 18-19 credits:1 core course in each student learning outcome category (12-13 credits), and 2 course electives (6 credits) in any of the thematic categories listed in the program of studies, but targeting two different learning outcomes. At least 9 credits of approved coursework must be taken at the 300-400 level, and no courses taken Pass/Fail will count towards the 18-19 credit requirement. Six credits of approved transfer work may be counted towards the minor; the remaining 12-13 credits must be taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. No more than two courses with the same subject (or content, as in cross-listed courses) can be applied to the minor.  Some courses may be substituted with the approval of the Global Studies Minor advisor.  Additional courses may be included within the minor as developed in the university curriculum.

 

Student Learning Outcomes: The minor gives students a competitive edge in the global job market.  Students earning the minor will be prepared to 1) understand connections that can be made from historical, cultural, economic, and political contexts that shape society and reflect global systems; 2) demonstrate knowledge of and be sensitive to others' differing identities and values across cultures; 3) apply intercultural communication skills to interact effectively with individuals and in groups; and 4) interact respectfully and responsibly across boundaries in diverse environments.

 

Program of Studies:

Core Courses: Choose one from ANTH 203, CES 244, ECONS 101, 198, POL S 103, or SOC 415. Choose one from ANTH 316, FINE ART 202, or POL S 428. Choose one from: COM 105, COMSOC 321, or FOR LANG 120. PLUS, complete one semester of foreign language study at WSU beyond the WSU admissions requirement.  Foreign language courses taken at WSU to fulfill the admissions requirement are not eligible to be applied to the minor. 
 
Electives: Six credits required. Choose two courses targeting two different learning outcomes (SLOs):
SLO 1 Connections among contexts: ANTH 260, CES 380, CROP SCI 360, ENGLISH 373, FINE ART 301, HISTORY 494 or 495 or approved upper-level World History course, HONORS 370, 380, 390, I BUS 380 or 470, POL S 429, SOC 334 or 430, SOE 390.

SLO 2 Knowledge about identities and values: ANTH 301 or 404, BIOLOGY 407, ENTOM 150, FOR LANG 110, HUMANITY 350, MUS 163 or 265, POL S 435, SOE 110.

SLO 3 Communication skills: Additional semester of same foreign language as used for the Core requirement or additional foreign language course taught in the foreign language at WSU.

SLO 4 Respectful interaction: ANTH 418, BIOLOGY 110, COMSOC 421, HISTORY 491, SOE 312.

 


Latin American and Spanish Area Studies

A minimum of 16 credits is required. A foundation of the target language, SPANISH 203 (4 credits), is required; in addition, 4 courses (12 credits) of further knowledge must be taken other than 203 as: EITHER one lower level and two upper-level courses in FLC plus one approved course in another department; OR one lower-level and one upper-level course in FLC plus two approved courses in another department. See the school for a list of acceptable courses. A minimum of 9 credits with a letter grade must be taken in residency at WSU at the 300-400 level. All courses must be passed with a grade of C or better. Only courses thus designated in the Catalog may be repeated for credit toward the minor. Courses counting towards a minor in the language may not be counted towards a major in International Area Studies (i.e., Latin America Area Studies, German Area Studies, French and Francophone Area Studies, or Russian Area Studies). 105, 205, and 305 may not count towards the minor. For courses taken in Study Abroad Programs or as other transfer credits, please check with your advisor.


Popular Culture

For the minor in Popular Culture students must complete a minimum of 21 credit hours, 9 of which must be upper-division course work and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. Required core courses (12 credit hours): AMER ST 216, CES 101 or 201, 260, and 325. Electives (9 credit hours): AMER ST 475, CES 209, 222, 308, 336, 338, 357, 358, 379, or 413. 


Religious Studies

M. Myers, Coordinator

For a minor in religious studies, a student must take at least 18 semester hours of work, of which at least half must be 300-400-level taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. The minor includes the core (minus the Seminar in Religious Studies) and three courses from the required list of comparative religion.

 



Certificates

American Indian Studies

Michael. Holloman, Coordinator

The certificate in American Indian Studies requires 18 semester hours which shall include a required core (9 hours) and 9 hours of electives.  15 of the credits must be taken at WSU, and 9 hours must be at the 300-400-level.  A minimum of 12 credits must be taken for a letter grade and a grade of C or better must be earned in each of the required and recommended courses in order to qualify for the certificate.  Any currently enrolled degree-seeking student is eligible to enroll in the certificate program.  Other students must meet the existing admissions standards for non-degree seeking students. The university undergraduate certificate fee will apply.  Students must complete 3 of the following 4 courses: ANTH 320, CES 171, HISTORY 308, or HISTORY 410.  The remaining 9 hours are chosen from the following elective courses: ANTH 327, 331, 334, 535, CES 372, 373, 379, 470, 475, FINE ART 301, HISTORY 410, or MUS 265.  Other courses in American Indian studies may be added to the elective pool as they become available. Contact Michael Holloman, coordinator, for more information. 


Core Competencies in Spanish Language and Culture

WSU's online Core Competencies in Spanish Language and Culture certificate program is the study of Spanish language and culture from the novice through intermediate language level. The Spanish-speaking world is a diverse cultural landscape covering nationalities from Europe, the Caribbean, Central America, South America, and beyond and is very valuable in today’s global economy.
 

The program leverages ever-expanding technology in online learning developed by one of the leading textbook publishers in the discipline. 

 

The certificate program can be its own stand-alone program or it can allow students entry into a Spanish minor or major at WSU. Core Competencies is perfect for businesses or individuals with the need to learn the Spanish language and to gain insight into Hispanic cultures. The University undergraduate certificate fee will apply.

 

Required Courses: Spanish 101, Spanish 102, Spanish 203, Spanish 204 (16 total credits).  Students must pass all classes with a C or better. 

 

 Proficiency Exam Requirement

 

Students who earn this certificate are also required to take an exit proficiency exam at the end of the academic term in which they complete the last course of the certificate. Students must pass the STAMP exam at the intermediate level in order to earn the certificate. This exam requires a fee. 


Italian Language Certificate

The Italian Language Certificate comprises four in-depth courses of basic communication skills in Italian by developing competency in basic to low-intermediate skills of speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture. To earn this certificate, students must complete a total of 16 hours by taking each of these courses: ITALIAN 101, 102, 203, and 204. This certificate is designed for non-native speakers of Italian and is offered at the level of attaining a basic expertise and knowledge in Italian language skills and culture.

 No more than 4 hours earned at other institutions may apply towards the certificate and no more than 4 hours may be pass/fail. Courses earned at another institution or by AP credit will be determined by the school regarding course equivalencies and allowance in the certificate. All courses must be earned with a grade of C or better. The University undergraduate certificate fee will apply.

 

Proficiency Exam Requirement 

 Students who earn this certificate are also required to take an exit proficiency exam at the end of the academic term in which they complete the last course of the certificate. Students must pass the STAMP exam at the intermediate level in order to earn the certificate. This exam requires a fee.



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


American Studies (AMER_ST)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


216 Introduction to American Cultural Studies 3 Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and the field of American studies. (Crosslisted course offered as AMER ST 216, CES 216, ENGLISH 216, HISTORY 216, WGSS 216. WGSS 216 formerly offered as WOMEN ST 216.) Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

216 (Effective through Summer 2021) Introduction to American Cultural Studies 3 Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and the field of American studies. (Crosslisted course offered as AMER ST 216, CES 216, ENGLISH 216, HISTORY 216, WOMEN ST 216). Typically offered Summer Session.

216 (Effective through Spring 2021) Introduction to American Cultural Studies 3 Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and the field of American studies. (Crosslisted course offered as AMER ST 216, ENGLISH 216, HISTORY 216, WOMEN ST 216). Typically offered Summer Session.

471 Cultural Politics Since World War II 3 American popular culture, politics and culture of the 1960s, or topics in recent cultural politics.

472 Ecological Issues and American Nature Writing 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Representation of nature in American fiction and nonfiction; role of culture in shaping environmental problems and solutions. (Crosslisted course offered as AMER ST 472, ENGLISH 472).

473 Arts in American Cultures 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Exploration of visual culture, from fine arts to advertising, as a political, sociological, psychological, and philosophical influence in 20th-century American cultures.

474 Social Movements and US Culture 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Cultural impact of selected social movements such as abolition, populism, labor, women's, ethnic power, gay/lesbian and anti-globalization.

475 (Effective through Summer 2021) [DIVR] Digital Diversity 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Cultural impact of digital media in cultural contexts; issues of race, class, gender, sexuality online. (Crosslisted course offered as DTC 475, AMER ST 475). Typically offered Summer Session.

505 Pro Seminar in American Cultural Studies 3 Critical theoretical engagement within an interdisciplinary field; emphasis on professionalism.

506 Frameworks in American Cultural Studies 3 Critical framework for intellectual, theoretical, and political genealogies within American Studies.

507 Contemporary Practices in American Cultural Studies 3 Overview of contemporary practices in American cultural studies; important concepts and major insights within the field.

511 U.S. Presence and Intervention in the Pacific Rim 3 Modern and contemporary relations between the United States and the nations and peoples of Asia and the Pacific; effects of war, technology, and globalization on those relations. Typically offered Spring.

512 Applied Linguistics in Contemporary American Culture 3 Linguistic theory from its historical foundations to current applications. Typically offered Fall.

515 The Neoliberal University 3 Critically considers the pedagogical, professional, institutional, and social effects of neoliberalism on higher education.

520 Colonization, Globalization and Decolonization 3 Topics in the critical study of colonialism, neo-colonialism, imperialism, globalization and resistance to these forces.

524 Critical Studies in Popular Culture 3 Interdisciplinary approaches to historical and contemporary trends and issues in US popular culture.

526 Contemporary Theories of Race and Ethnicity 3 Major theoretical readings and key recent texts in U.S. and transnational ethnic studies scholarship.

528 Cultural Studies 3 Basic theory and core methods of the field of cultural studies through a cross discipline approach.

529 Cultural Politics of the Body 3 An interdisciplinary investigation of the historical, sociopolitical, biotechnical, and economic materialities of the human body within and across an array of identity categories.

553 Latino/a and Latin American Literatures and Cultures 3 Autobiographies, journals, and memoirs of Latino/a authors as a means of exploring the past and envisioning the future. Typically offered Spring.

555 U.S. Interventions in Latin America 3 The hegemonic presence of the United States in Latin America, including strategies ranging from military invasion to subtle indoctrination through popular culture. Typically offered Spring.

560 Critical Studies in Race and Popular Culture 3 Foundational and contemporary texts in popular culture studies that address the significance of race in our understanding and consumption of popular culture. Typically offered Spring.

580 Immigration and Citizenship 3 Current research around the historic, social, economic, and political conditions that have influenced the flow of immigrants, their status as citizens, and their national/international identity. Typically offered Spring.

590 Seminar in American Studies 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 hours. Interdisciplinary topics in American culture.

596 Topics in American Studies 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 hours. American Studies Summer Institute. (Crosslisted course offered as AMER ST 596, HISTORY 596).

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the American Studies PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. S, U grading.


Arabic (ARABIC)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester 4 Fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

102 Second Semester 4 Course Prerequisite: ARABIC 101 with a grade of C or better. Continued development of basic skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

203 Third Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: ARABIC 102 with a grade of C or better. Further development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall.

204 Fourth Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: ARABIC 203 with a grade of C or better. Continued practice in spoken and written language; selected texts in a cultural context. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Spring.


Cross-Disciplinary Arts And Sciences (CAS)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


310 [HUM] [M] Special Topics in the Humanities 3 A cross-disciplinary exploration of methods, topics, concerns, or themes pertinent to the disciplines and traditions of the Humanities.

310 (Effective through Fall 2021) [HUM] [M] Special Topics in the Humanities 3 A cross-disciplinary exploration of methods, topics, concerns, or themes pertinent to the disciplines and traditions of the Humanities.

311 [SSCI] [M] Special Topics in Social Sciences: Cross-disciplinary Studies 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Research, writing, and exploration of topics in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective.

311 (Effective through Summer 2021) [SSCI] [M] Special Topics in Social Sciences: Cross-disciplinary Studies 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Research, writing, and exploration of topics in the social sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective.

400 End-of-Program Evaluation Portfolio 1 Course Prerequisite: Senior standing. Evaluation of crossdisciplinary educational experience resulting in written and symbolic portfolio format. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

410 [CAPS] Interdisciplinary Approaches to the University 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. An interdisciplinary approach to the history, politics, everyday realities, economics, and cultural representations of America's colleges and universities. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

497 Internship V 2-16 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 16 hours. Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Supervised student experiential activities as paid or unpaid intern in business, education, health, non-profit, industry, or other organizations. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.


Comparative Ethnic Studies (CES)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 [DIVR] Race and Racism in the United States 3 Overview of race, ethnicity, and racism within social, cultural, and historical structures and systems in the United States.

101 (Effective through Summer 2021) [DIVR] Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies 3 Comparative issues in Asian American, African American, Chicana/o, and Native American cultures in the United States.

111 [HUM] Introduction to Asian Pacific American Studies 3 Examination of the social, political, economic, and cultural experiences of Asian/Pacific Americans in the historical and contemporary period.

131 [SSCI] Introduction to Black Studies 3 An introduction to general knowledge concerning African Americans in the US.

151 [HUM] Introduction to Chicano/Latino Studies 3 Examination of the history, culture, political and economic status of Chicano/as and Latino/as in the US.

171 [SSCI] Introduction to Indigenous Studies 3 Introduction to indigenous studies; introductory course to contemporary indigenous cultures and politics.

201 Foundations of Comparative Ethnic Studies 3 Critical examination of the history, methodology and theoretical concepts of ethnic studies. Typically offered Fall.

204 Critical Studies in Whiteness 3 Political and cultural practices that define whiteness through history, popular culture and everyday life.

209 [HUM] Hip Hop Around the Globe 3 Diversity and complexity of hip hop at a local, national and global level.

211 Asian Pacific American History 3 Historical experience of Asian/Pacific Americans since the 19th century. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 211, HISTORY 201).

216 Introduction to American Cultural Studies 3 Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and the field of American studies. (Crosslisted course offered as AMER ST 216, CES 216, ENGLISH 216, HISTORY 216, WGSS 216. WGSS 216 formerly offered as WOMEN ST 216.)

216 (Effective through Summer 2021) Introduction to American Cultural Studies 3 Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and the field of American studies. (Crosslisted course offered as AMER ST 216, CES 216, ENGLISH 216, HISTORY 216, WOMEN ST 216).

220 [HUM] Introduction to Multicultural Literature 3 Survey of multicultural literature including European American, African American, Asian American, Chicana/o, and Native American authors. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 220, ENGLISH 220).

222 Race in Sport Films 3 (2-2) Examination of racial politics through critical discussions of sport film.

235 [HUM] African American History 3 History of African Americans in the US with emphasis upon major themes of the Black experience. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 235, HISTORY 235).

240 Global Indigenous Issues 3 Critical examination of global indigenous politics in a historical perspective.

244 [SSCI] Critical Globalizations 3 Critical examination of the historical trajectory and contemporary practices, institutions and policies that make up globalization.

254 [SSCI] Comparative Latino/a Cultures 3 Comparison of the contemporary and historical experiences of Latinos and Latinas in the United States, and their relations with other ethnic minority groups and the majority populations.

255 Latina/o Diasporic Communities in the U.S. 3 Exploration of historical movements, settlement, and interactions within the United States of different Latina/o groups.

260 [HUM] Race and Racism in US Popular Culture 3 Examines images, ideologies, and identities; introduces key concepts and methods; focuses on race, gender, sexuality and class.

271 [HUM] Native Music of North America 3 Music and ceremonialism as a reflection of realities in North American native cultures, past and present. (Crosslisted course offered as MUS 265, CES 271).

280 Race and the Law in American History 3 Introduction to the role of the law in American race-relations since 1750. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 280, HISTORY 280).

291 [DIVR] Anti-Semitism 3 Historical, social, theological, and ideological dimensions of anti-Semitism.

301 [M] Race and Global Inequality 3 Examination of nationalism, colonization, empire-building, racism, ethnic conflict, and class inequality in a global context. Typically offered Spring.

302 Social Psychology of Prejudice 3 Causes and nature of prejudice from social, psychological, and cultural theoretical perspectives.

308 [SSCI] Cultural Politics of Sport 3 A critical examination of US sports through class, race, gender, sexuality, nationalism and criminality.

313 [HUM] Asian Pacific American Literature 3 Asian American fiction, drama, poetry, and other arts, 1900 to present; impact of Asian/Pacific American culture and experience upon these works. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 313, ENGLISH 311).

314 [M] Topics in Asian Pacific American Literature 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Trends, themes, major writers. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 314, ENGLISH 314).

315 [M] Asian Pacific American Autobiography 3 Critical readings of the autobiographical works, memoirs, and life writings by Asian Pacific Americans. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 315, ENGLISH 315).

325 [DIVR] Traveling Cultures: Tourism in Global Perspective 3 Social relations and cultural practices central to tourism with examples from around the world.

330 From Malcolm X to the Black Panthers 3 Complex understanding of the history of black politics in the 1960's.

331 African American Literature 3 Introduction to major issues and major works in the African American literary tradition. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 331, ENGLISH 321).

332 [DIVR] [M] Topics in African American Literature 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Trends and major writers. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGLISH 322, CES 332).

335 [SSCI] Black Freedom Struggle 3 Historic exploration of black resistance focusing on nationwide movement that developed following World War II. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 335, HISTORY 313).

336 Black Popular Culture 3 Histories of African American pop culture; examines how African American cultural specificities emerge and transform American popular imaginations.

338 Cinematic Images of Blackness 3 Critical perspectives on the history of cinematic images of blackness; traces experiences of blacks within Hollywood as actor or artist, subject or image. Typically offered Summer Session.

353 [M] Contemporary Latina/o Literatures 3 Latina/o literature, narrative, novel, autobiography, poetry, short story, and drama. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 353, ENGLISH 345).

357 Latinas/os and U.S. Popular Culture 3 Examination of the participation and representation of Latina/o bodies in different aspects of U.S. popular culture.

358 [M] US Latino/as in Film 3 (2-3) Critical analysis of Latinas and Latinos in contemporary US mainstream movies and independent films.

359 Chicana/o and Latina/o Politics 3 Character, role, and goals of Chicano/Latino politics; contemporary Chicano/Latino issues. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 359, POL S 375).

372 Indigenous Women in Traditional and Contemporary Societies 3 Course Prerequisite: ANTH 101, 214, CES 101, or 171. Exploration of roles and activities of women in indigenous societies; how traditional gender roles have developed and changed.

373 [M] Native American Literature 3 Native American literature, by and about the original inhabitants, image and counter-image, with emphasis on the 20th century. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 373, ENGLISH 341).

379 Indigenous Film 3 Critical examination of films and videos featuring and by indigenous peoples; traces the history of the indigenous peoples as subjects of films and as filmmakers.

380 Immigration and Citizenship in the Global Economy 3 Examination of past and current notions of immigration and citizenship in North American, Asian, and European countries as defined by government officials, political organizations, community groups, and popular culture.

401 Seminar in Culture and Power 3 Complex power relations that develop among competing local, regional, national, and global culture(s).

405 [CAPS] Cultural Criticism and Theory 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Major critiques and theories of colonialist and imperialist formations of culture. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 405, ENGLISH 410).

406 Philosophy and Race 3 Course Prerequisite: 3 hours in PHIL or CES 201. Examination of race within western philosophy including work of philosophers of color and analysis of the category race. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 406, PHIL 406).

407 Race, Gender and the Prison Industrial Complex 3 Race, gender and nationality and how they affect the organization and maintenance of the prison industrial complex.

411 Asian Pacific American Women 3 Course Prerequisite: CES or WGSS course; junior standing. Intersection of ethnicity, race, class, gender and sexuality in the lives of Asian Pacific American women. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 411, WGSS 411. WGSS 411 formerly offered as WOMEN ST 411.)

411 (Effective through Summer 2021) Asian Pacific American Women 3 Course Prerequisite: CES or WOMEN ST course; junior standing. Intersection of ethnicity, race, class, gender and sexuality in the lives of Asian Pacific American women. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 411, WOMEN ST 411).

413 Asian Pacific Americans and Popular Culture 3 Course Prerequisite: CES 101 or 111. Examines the racial politics that have developed around the representation of Asian Pacific Americans in US popular culture.

426 Workers Across North America 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. International interactions between workers and labor unions in Mexico, Canada and the US. (Crosslisted course offered as CES 426, HISTORY 426).

435 African American Women in US Society 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Critical terms and models for understanding the experiences of African American women in antebellum America to the present; an interdisciplinary forum concerned with the national experience of the African American woman experience.

436 Black Masculinities 3 Historical, political and cultural constructions of images of black manhood and the effects on black male subjectivity.

440 [CAPS] Global Social Justice 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Examination of social justice issues in the United States and transnationally.

442 Nation, Ethnicity, and Modernity 3 Relationship between modernity and nation-making in relation to dominant constructions of race and ethnicity and histories of colonialism.

444 White Power Movements and Ideologies 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Critical assessment of white supremacist and nationalist movements and ideologies around the globe.

446 Racism and Anti-Racism in Global Context 3 Theory and practice of anti-racism; history and scope; strategies to transform racist systems.

454 Latinas in U.S. Culture and Society 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Intersections of race, class, gender and sexual orientation in the experience of a marginalized group - Chicanas.

465 Race, Science, and Society 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Racial thinking in science tracing the impact of scientific racism on policy, popular thought and social movements.

470 Indigenous Politics 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. An overview of the struggles of indigenous people; issues include rights, recognition, identity, natural resources, intellectual property, and repatriation globally.

475 Indians of the Northwest 3 Course Prerequisite: ANTH 320, CES 171, 375, 377, or HIST 308; junior standing. History and ethnography of Native Americans of the Coast and Plateau; historic relationship with Europeans and Euro-Americans, and other Native Americans, Asian Americans, and Chicanas/os.

485 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-15 May be repeated for credit. S, F grading.

489 [CAPS] Everyday Struggles for Justice and Equality 3 Course Prerequisite: CES 201; junior standing. Investigation of everyday realities of racism, sexism, and heterosexism; applied research; communication of findings through new and/or creative media.

491 [M] Theories of Racism and Ethnic Conflicts 3 Provides general knowledge of the history of racist ideas and the social, political, and cultural contexts underlying ethnic conflicts. Typically offered Fall.

494 Advanced Topics in Ethnic Studies 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 hours. Course Prerequisite: 3 credits in CES. A reading and discussion course that explores special topics in ethnic studies.

495 Special Topics in Comparative Ethnic Studies 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: 3 credits in CES. Cross-cultural studies on Asian Pacific Americans, Blacks, Chicanas/os, and Native Americans.

498 Internship in Comparative Ethnic Studies V 1-3 Course Prerequisite: 12 hours of CES; junior standing. Internship component for CES majors and minors. S, F grading.

499 Directed Independent Study V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. S, F grading.


Chinese (CHINESE)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester 4 Fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

102 Second Semester 4 Prerequisite: CHINESE 101 with a grade of C or better. Continuation of CHINESE 101. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Required preparation must include CHINESE 101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

105 Elementary Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 101 or concurrent enrollment, or CHINESE 102 or concurrent enrollment. Elementary-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

111 Asian Film 3 Asian film from a cultural perspective. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as CHINESE 111, ASIA 111, JAPANESE 111). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

120 Traditional Chinese Culture 3 Cultural development of China from early times through the golden age of Chinese civilization. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as CHINESE 120, ASIA 120, HUMANITY 120). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

121 [HUM] Modern Chinese Culture 3 An introduction to the culture of modern China, including Hong Kong and Taiwan. All readings in English. (Crosslisted course offered as CHINESE 121, ASIA 121). Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

131 Masterpieces of Asian Literature 3 Introduction to Asian literature. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as CHINESE 131, ASIA 131, HUMANITY 131, JAPANESE 131). Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

180 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

203 Third Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 102 with a grade of C or better. Further development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

204 Fourth Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 203 with a grade of C or better. Continued practice in spoken and written language; selected texts in a cultural context. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

205 Intermediate Conversation I 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 203 or concurrent enrollment, or CHINESE 204 or concurrent enrollment. Intermediate-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

261 Chinese for the Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 203 with a grade of C or better. Profession-specific language skills training - healthcare, law enforcement, business - with emphasis on speaking and listening. Not open to native speakers except with permission.

280 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

305 Intermediate Conversation II 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 204 or a 300-level CHINESE course or concurrent enrollment. Conversation practice in small groups. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

306 Intermediate Reading and Translation 3 Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. English-Chinese expressions, development of skills to increase reading speed and fluency. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

307 Intermediate Speaking and Listening 3 Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Early advanced training in speaking, reading and writing on abstract topics in Chinese; continued development of listening comprehension skills. Taught in Chinese. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

308 Intermediate Grammar and Writing 3 Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Writing practice in the language and active review of grammar. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Summer Session. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

311 [M] Great Asian Directors 3 (2-3) Focused study of two prominent Asian film directors. Taught in English.

320 [DIVR] [M] Issues in East Asian Ethics 3 Philosophical foundations of ethical thought in East Asia; informed responses to modern ethical dilemmas. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as JAPANESE 320, ASIA 320, CHINESE 320, HUMANITY 320). Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

321 [M] Gender and Love in East Asian Culture 3 The theme of gender with respect to love, courage, self-sacrifice, and vulnerability in traditional Chinese and Japanese literature and culture. (Crosslisted course offered as CHINESE 321, ASIA 321, JAPANESE 321). Typically offered Spring.

322 [DIVR] Ecology in East Asian Cultures 3 Major ecological issues in East Asia through cultural representations, and analysis of their implications to the U.S. (Crosslisted course offered as ASIA 322, CHINESE 322, HUMANITY 322, JAPANESE 322). Typically offered Spring.

330 [M] The Art of War 3 (2-2) The philosophy behind war, military strategy and its consequences and representation in literature and film from East Asia. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as CHINESE 330, ASIA 330). Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

361 Advanced Chinese for the Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Communication in Chinese in the professional setting; telephone and meeting role play, letter writing, television and discussion of current events. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

363 Introduction to Literary Chinese 3 Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Fundamentals of literary Chinese. Open to native speakers. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

364 Media Chinese 3 Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Study of Chinese using newspapers, television news, radio broadcasts, webcasts and other journalistic media. Taught in Chinese. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

380 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

405 Advanced Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: CHINESE 305. Advanced-level conversation practice in small groups with a native speaker. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

450 Seminar in Chinese Studies - Themes 3 Course Prerequisite: Two CHINESE 300-level courses excluding CHINESE 305. Seminar on important themes in Chinese studies. Taught in Chinese. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.


Classics (CLASSICS)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


180 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

280 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

380 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.


Foreign Languages And Cultures (FOR_LANG)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


100 Studies in Foreign Languages I V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 hours. Languages, topics, or foreign language skills/learning opportunities not covered by other 100-level courses. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

101 [HUM] Introduction to the World of Languages 3 Taught in English. Explore the nature, history, evolution, acquisition, and use of language with examples from major foreign language groups. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

110 [DIVR] Introduction to Global Film 3 Taught in English. An introduction to the study of global film, situating stories and cinematic features within cultural contexts. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

120 [HUM] Introduction to Foreign Cultures 3 An introduction to inter-/intra-cultural communication of foreign cultures, plus customs, art, music, religion, fashion, food, et al. Taught in English. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

130 [HUM] Global Literature in Translation 3 Taught in English. An introduction to the study of international literature; stories, cultures, and literary devices. (Crosslisted course offered as FOR LANG 130, HUMANITY 130).

180 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Typically offered Spring. S, F grading.

200 Studies in Foreign Languages II V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 hours. Languages, topics, or foreign language skills/learning opportunities not covered by other 200-level courses. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

210 Foreign Film and Lecture Series 1 1 (0-3) An introduction to foreign films through universal themes and their varied cinematic portrayal. Typically offered Spring. S, F grading.

220 Global Issues, Regional Realities 3 Introduction to the study of interconnections of global and local issues and themes; universalizing and particularizing tendencies in contemporary societies. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as FOR LANG 220, ASIA 220).

221 Pre-Study/Internship Abroad Orientation 1 Taught in English. Orientation and practical information for students preparing to study or intern abroad. S, F grading.

280 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Typically offered Spring. S, F grading.

300 Studies in Foreign Languages V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Languages not currently a part of the curriculum may be offered on demand. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

370 Aztec, Mayan, and Incan Mythology 3 A critical cultural journey though stories, myths, and other beliefs attributed to the three main indigenous groups conquered by Spaniards; taught in English. Typically offered Spring.

371 Norse Mythology 3 Scandinavian/ Germanic mythology: the pantheon, the myths, and the people; stories of the Norsemen who have had a broad influence on the English world and language. Typically offered Fall.

372 South Asian Mythology 3 Literary, cultural, traditional, and religious aspects of South Asia myths, folktales, and legends. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

373 Chinese Mythology 3 Examination of distinctive mythical stories in oral, literature, and classical tradition and their impact on modern Chinese culture, values, social customs, religious beliefs, philosophical ideas, and political and historical insights. Taught in English. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

380 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

400 Special Topics 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: GENED 110 or 111. Interdisciplinary study of foreign languages, literature, or culture. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

410 [CAPS] Advanced Topics in Global Cinema 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: One [HUM]; one [ARTS]; junior standing. Taught in English. Analysis of cinematography and culture in film to reveal how societies respond to contemporary issues in a global context. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

440 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages 3 Course Prerequisite: 204-level foreign language course. Survey of current methodology with emphasis on practical application in the classroom. Credit not granted for both FOR LANG 440 and FOR LANG 540. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

441 Research and Methods of Technology Enhanced Foreign Language Learning 3 Taught in English. The use of technology in the foreign language classroom; hands-on experience with equipment and multi-media materials. Credit not granted for both FOR LANG 441 and 541. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

495 Cooperative Education Internship V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Cooperative education internship with academic, business, industry or government units. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

540 Methods of Teaching Foreign Languages 3 Survey of current methodology with emphasis on practical application in the classroom. Credit not granted for both FOR LANG 440 and FOR LANG 540. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

541 Research and Methods of Technology Enhanced Foreign Language Learning 3 Taught in English. The use of technology in the foreign language classroom; hands-on experience with equipment and multi-media materials. Credit not granted for both FOR LANG 441 and 541. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

560 Seminar in Scholarly Methodology 3 Bibliography and formal aspects of scholarly writing; general introduction to literary criticism. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.


French (FRENCH)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester 4 Fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Credit not granted for FRENCH 101/102, and 104. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

102 Second Semester 4 Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 101 with a grade of C or better. Continued development of basic skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Credit not granted for FRENCH 101/102, and 104. Required preparation must include FRENCH 101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

104 Intensive French: Foundations of Language and Culture 4 Intensive first-year French, emphasizing reading, writing, oral expression and comprehension, cultural awareness. Serves as a prerequisite for FRENCH 203. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Credit not granted for FRENCH 101/102 and 104. Typically offered Summer Session.

105 Elementary Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 101 or concurrent enrollment, or FRENCH 102 or concurrent enrollment. Elementary-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

110 [HUM] French/Francophone Film 3 French and Francophone Film. Taught in English. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

120 [HUM] French Culture 3 Cultural history of France from beginnings to present; comparison of French and American cultures. Taught in English. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

180 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

203 Third Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 102 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Grammar review and further development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

204 Fourth Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 203 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Continued practice in spoken and written language; selected texts in a cultural context. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

205 Intermediate Conversation I 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 203 or concurrent enrollment, or FRENCH 204 or concurrent enrollment. Intermediate-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

261 French for the Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 203 with a grade of C or better. Profession-specific language skills training - healthcare, law enforcement, business - with emphasis on speaking and listening. Not open to native speakers except with permission.

280 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

305 Intermediate Conversation II 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 204, or a 300-level FRENCH course or concurrent enrollment. Conversation practice in small groups with native/near-native speakers. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

306 Intermediate Reading and Translation 3 Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Vocabulary building, contrastive English-French expressions, development of skills to increase reading speed and fluency. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

307 Intermediate Speaking and Listening 3 Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Systematic development of speaking and listening proficiency; emphasis on pronunciation and phonetics. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

307 (Effective through Summer 2021) Intermediate Speaking and Listening 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Systematic development of speaking and listening proficiency; emphasis on pronunciation and phonetics. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

308 [M] Intermediate Grammar and Writing 3 Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Writing practice in the language and active review of grammar. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall.

310 French and Francophone Film 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 306, 307, or 308. Taught in French. View and discuss French and Francophone films from the 1930's to present. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

320 [HUM] [M] French/Francophone Culture 3 Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 306, 307, or 308. Contemporary French and Francophone culture studied through history, arts, and current events. Taught in French. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

321 L'Art de Vivre in Paris 3 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: French 204. Summer faculty-led study abroad in Paris; combines lecture and cultural excursions. Taught in French. Typically offered Summer Session.

350 Introduction to French Literature 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 306, 307, or 308. Taught in French. French and Francophone novels, short stories and plays. Typically offered Spring.

361 [COMM] Advanced French for the Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Communication in French for professional purposes; telephone and meeting role-plays, letter- and resume-writing, discussions of current events in the Francophone world. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

362 French for Design and Merchandising 3 Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Exploration of the world of French fashion with emphasis on the development of applicable language skills and cultural knowledge; taught in French. Typically offered Fall.

380 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

405 Advanced Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 408 or concurrent enrollment. Advanced-level conversation practice in small groups with a native speaker. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

408 [M] Advanced French 3 Course Prerequisite: FRENCH 308 with a C or better. Systematic development of language skills at the advanced level. Typically offered Spring.

410 [CAPS] French Film in Translation 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. In depth study of French cinema integrating its history, techniques, methods, and global impact. Taught in English. French majors will complete academic work requirements in the target language. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

420 [CAPS] French Culture Through Wine 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. French societal and cultural heritage through the geography, history, production, legislation, and consumption of wine. Taught in English. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

430 [CAPS] Topics in French/Francophone Literature in Translation 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Taught in English. In-depth reading and discussion of a select group of French literary works of a particular theme, genre, or author. Typically offered Fall.

450 [M] Seminar in French Studies - Themes 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Two 300-level FRENCH courses, excluding FRENCH 305. Seminar on important themes in French studies. Taught in French. Typically offered Spring.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.


German (GERMAN)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester 4 Fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

102 Second Semester 4 Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 101 with a grade of C or better. Continued development of basic skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Required preparation must include GERMAN 101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

105 Elementary Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 101 or concurrent enrollment, or GERMAN 102 or concurrent enrollment. Elementary-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

110 German Film 3 Taught in English. Introduction to German film.

120 [HUM] Germanic Culture 3 Taught in English. The cultural development of the Germanic peoples to 1990.

180 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

203 Third Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 102 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Further development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

204 Fourth Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 203 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Continued practice in spoken and written language; selected texts in a cultural context. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

205 Intermediate Conversation I 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 203 or concurrent enrollment, or GERMAN 204 or concurrent enrollment. Intermediate-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

280 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

305 Intermediate Conversation II 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 204; or a 300-level GERMAN course or concurrent enrollment. Conversation practice in small groups with native/near-native speakers. Not open to native speakers except with permission. S, F grading.

307 [COMM] Intermediate Speaking and Listening 3 Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Systematic development of speaking and listening proficiency; emphasis on pronunciation and phonetics. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

307 (Effective through Summer 2021) Intermediate Speaking and Listening 3 Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Systematic development of speaking and listening proficiency; emphasis on pronunciation and phonetics. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

308 [M] Intermediate Grammar and Writing 3 Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Writing practice in the language and active review of grammar. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

310 German Film 3 Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 307 or GERMAN 308. Study of important German films. Taught in German. Typically offered Spring.

320 [HUM] German Culture 3 Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 307 or GERMAN 308. Introduction to German culture. Taught in German. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

321 Germanic Empires, Peoples, Places 3 Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Introduction to German and/or Austrian culture. Taught on-site as part of a faculty-led study abroad summer program to Germany and/or Austria. Typically offered Summer Session.

350 Introduction to German Literature 3 Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 307 or GERMAN 308. Survey of masterpieces of German literature. Taught in German. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

361 [COMM] German for the Professions 3 Course Prerequisites: GERMAN 307 or 308 with a C or better. Language and intercultural skills necessary for effective oral and written communication in professional settings in German-speaking countries. Taught in German.

380 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

408 [M] Advanced Grammar and Writing 3 Course Prerequisite: GERMAN 308 with a grade of C or better. Development of advanced proficiency in writing. Typically offered Spring.

420 [CAPS] Socio-Cultural History of the German Language 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Historical survey of the German language, observing domestic and foreign societal influences, considering present and future language directions.

450 [M] Seminar in German Studies - Themes 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Two GERMAN 300-level courses excluding GERMAN 305. Seminar on important themes in German studies. Taught in German. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

451 [M] Seminar in German Studies - Authors 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Two GERMAN 300-level courses excluding GERMAN 305. Seminar on important authors in German studies. Taught in German. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

452 [M] Seminar in German Studies - Genres 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Two GERMAN 300-level courses excluding GERMAN 305. Seminar on important genres in German studies. Taught in German. Typically offered Spring.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.


Italian (ITALIAN)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester 4 (3-2) Fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

102 Second Semester 4 (3-2) Continued development of basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Required preparation must include ITALIAN 101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

105 Elementary Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: ITALIAN 101 or concurrent enrollment, or ITALIAN 102 or concurrent enrollment. Elementary-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

180 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

203 Third Semester 4 Course Prerequisite: ITALIAN 102 with a C or better. Continuation of ITALIAN 102; grammar review, further development of speaking, reading, and writing skills. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

204 Fourth Semester 4 Course Prerequisite: ITALIAN 203 with a C or better. Continuation of ITALIAN 203; grammar review; continued practice in spoken and written language; selected texts in a cultural context. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

205 Intermediate Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Intermediate-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Required preparation must include two semesters of ITALIAN at the college level or equivalent proficiency. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

280 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

380 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.


Japanese (JAPANESE)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester 4 Fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

102 Second Semester 4 Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 101 with a grade of C or better. Continued development of basic skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Required preparation must include JAPANESE 101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

105 Elementary Conversation 1 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 101 or concurrent enrollment, or JAPANESE 102 or concurrent enrollment. Elementary-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

111 Asian Film 3 Asian film from a cultural perspective. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as CHINESE 111, ASIA 111, JAPANESE 111). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

120 Traditional Japanese Culture 3 Traditional Japanese society and culture from ancient themes to the 19th century. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as JAPANESE 120, ASIA 122). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

123 [HUM] Modern Japanese Culture 3 Issues, trends, and forms of popular culture that define modern and contemporary Japanese life. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as JAPANESE 123, ASIA 123). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

131 Masterpieces of Asian Literature 3 Introduction to Asian literature. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as CHINESE 131, ASIA 131, HUMANITY 131, JAPANESE 131). Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

180 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours.

203 Third Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 102 with a grade of C or better. Further development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

204 Fourth Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 203 with a grade of C or better. Continued practice in spoken and written language; selected texts in a cultural context. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

205 Intermediate Conversation I 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 203 or concurrent enrollment, or JAPANESE 204 or concurrent enrollment. Intermediate-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker; not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

280 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

305 Intermediate Conversation II 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 204, or a 300-level JAPANESE course or concurrent enrollment. Conversation practice in small groups with native/near-native speakers. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

306 Intermediate Reading and Translation 3 Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Vocabulary building, contrastive English-Japanese expressions, development of skills of increase reading speed and fluency. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Spring.

307 Intermediate Speaking and Listening 3 Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Systematic development of speaking and listening proficiency; emphasis on pronunciation and phonetics. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

308 Intermediate Grammar and Writing 3 Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Writing practice in the language and active review of grammar. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall.

320 [DIVR] [M] Issues in East Asian Ethics 3 Philosophical foundations of ethical thought in East Asia; informed responses to modern ethical dilemmas. Taught in English. (Crosslisted course offered as JAPANESE 320, ASIA 320, CHINESE 320, HUMANITY 320). Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

321 [M] Gender and Love in East Asian Culture 3 The theme of gender with respect to love, courage, self-sacrifice, and vulnerability in traditional Chinese and Japanese literature and culture. (Crosslisted course offered as CHINESE 321, ASIA 321, JAPANESE 321). Typically offered Spring.

322 [DIVR] Ecology in East Asian Cultures 3 Major ecological issues in East Asia through cultural representations, and analysis of their implications to the U.S. (Crosslisted course offered as ASIA 322, CHINESE 322, HUMANITY 322, JAPANESE 322). Typically offered Spring.

361 Advanced Japanese for the Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: JAPANESE 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Communication in Japanese for professional purposes, including letter/e-mail writing, telephoning, interpreting, role-playing, and negotiating in the Japanese business world. Typically offered Spring.

380 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.


Korean (KOREAN)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester 4 Fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

102 Second Semester 4 Course Prerequisite: KOREAN 101 with a grade of C or better. Continued development of basic skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

203 Third Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: KOREAN 102 with a grade of C or better. Further development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

204 Fourth Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: KOREAN 203 with a grade of C or better. Continued practice in spoken and written language; selected texts in a cultural context. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.


Latin (LATIN)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester Latin 4 Latin fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills.

102 Second Semester Latin 4 Continued development of Latin speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. Required preparation must include LATIN 101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency.

103 Latin Grammar Tutorial 1 Course Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in LATIN 101 or 102. Student-centered, instructor-facilitated grammar tutorial and review session focusing on material presented in LATIN 101 and 102. S, F grading.


Russian (RUSSIAN)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester 4 Fundamentals of speaking, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

102 Second Semester 4 Course Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 101 with a grade of C or better. Continued development of basic skills in speaking, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Required preparation must include RUSSIAN 101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

105 Elementary Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 101 or concurrent enrollment, or RUSSIAN 102 or concurrent enrollment. Elementary-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

180 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

203 Third Semester 4 (3-2) Further development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Required preparation must include RUSSIAN 102 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

204 Fourth Semester 4 (3-3) Continued practice in spoken and written language; selected texts in a cultural context. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Required preparation must include RUSSIAN 203 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

205 Intermediate Conversation I 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 203 or concurrent enrollment, or RUSSIAN 204 or concurrent enrollment. Intermediate-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

261 Russian for the Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 203 with a grade of C or better. Profession-specific language skills training - healthcare, law enforcement, business - with emphasis on speaking and listening. Not open to native speakers except with permission.

280 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

305 Intermediate Conversation II 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 204 or a 300-level RUSSIAN course or concurrent enrollment. Conversation practice in small groups. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, F grading.

321 Contemporary Russian Culture 3 Taught in English. Current cultural and social trends in the former USSR. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

361 Advanced Russian for the Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: RUSSIAN 204 with a grade of C or better. Communication in Russian for professional purposes; telephone and meeting role-plays; letter and resume writing; discussions of current events in the Russian-speaking world. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

380 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

410 Russian Film 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Russian daily life, historical events, and values in representative samples of Russian film. Taught in English. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

430 St. Petersburg 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Taught in English. The image and role of St. Petersburg in Russian classics in literature, art, music, and film. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

462 History of Imperial Russia 3 History and culture of Imperial Russia from Peter the Great to the 1905 revolution. (Crosslisted course offered as HISTORY 462, RUSSIAN 462). Typically offered Spring.

463 [M] History of the Soviet Union 3 The Russian revolutions and the Soviet regime: 1905 to the present. (Crosslisted course offered as HISTORY 463, RUSSIAN 463). Offered at 400 and 500 level.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.


Spanish (SPANISH)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 First Semester 4 Fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

102 Second Semester 4 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 101 with a grade of C or better. Continued development of basic skills in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Required preparation must include SPANISH 101 with a grade of C or better or equivalent proficiency. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

105 Elementary Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 101 or concurrent enrollment, or SPANISH 102 or concurrent enrollment. Elementary-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

110 [ARTS] Peninsular Spanish Film 3 Introduction to Spanish film. Taught in English. Typically offered Fall.

111 [ARTS] Latin American Film 3 History of Latin American cinema from a cultural perspective. Taught in English. Typically offered Spring.

120 [HUM] Peninsular Spanish Culture 3 Introduction to Spanish culture. Taught in English. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

121 [HUM] Latin American Culture 3 Contemporary social, political, and cultural issues in Latin America. Taught in English. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

180 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

203 Third Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 102 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Further development of speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

204 Fourth Semester 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 203 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Continued practice in spoken and written language; selected texts in a cultural context. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

205 Intermediate Conversation I 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 203 or concurrent enrollment, or SPANISH 204 or concurrent enrollment. Intermediate-level conversation practice in small groups with a native/near-native speaker. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

208 Spanish for Heritage Speakers 4 Course Prerequisite: By instructor permission. Formal aspects of basic grammar combined with a strong writing component for language skills reinforcement in writing and speaking. For heritage/native speakers only.

261 Spanish for the Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 203 with a C or better. Profession-specific language skills training - healthcare, law enforcement, business - with emphasis on speaking and listening. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall.

280 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

305 Intermediate Conversation II 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 204 or a 300-level SPANISH course or concurrent enrollment. Conversation practice in small groups with native/near native speakers. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

306 Intermediate Reading and Translation 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Vocabulary building, contrastive English-Spanish expressions, development of skills to increase reading speed and fluency. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

307 Intermediate Speaking and Listening 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Systematic development of speaking and listening proficiency; emphasis on pronunciation and phonetics. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

308 Intermediate Grammar and Writing 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 204 with a C or better or equivalent proficiency. Writing practice in the language and active review of grammar. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

310 [ARTS] Peninsular Spanish Film 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308. Study of important Spanish films. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

310 (Effective through Summer 2021) Peninsular Spanish Film 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308. Study of important Spanish films. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

311 [ARTS] Latin American Film 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308. Variable content seminar that focuses on the study of culture through films; taught in Spanish. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

311 (Effective through Spring 2021) Latin American Film 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308. Variable content seminar that focuses on the study of culture through films; taught in Spanish.

320 Peninsular Spanish Culture 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308. Study of the culture of Spain. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Fall.

321 [DIVR] Latin American Cultures 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308. Study of Latin American culture. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Spring.

350 [ARTS] Introduction to Peninsular Spanish Literature 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308. Introduction of literary analysis and the history of literature in Spain. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

351 [ARTS] Introduction to Latin American Literature 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308. Introduction to literary analysis and the history of literature in Latin America. Taught in Spanish.

361 Spanish for the Business Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Specialized language training for business professionals including basic concepts and economies of Hispanic countries. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall.

362 Spanish for Health Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Specialized language training for health professionals focusing on the main systems of human anatomy. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Spring.

363 Spanish for Law Enforcement 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Specialized Spanish language training in the law enforcement profession. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Spring.

364 Spanish for Veterinarians 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Spanish language and culture for veterinary professionals; client-veterinarian situations with specialized terms considering cultural aspects. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

365 Spanish for Translation and Interpretation Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 306, 307, or 308 with a C or better. Specialized Spanish language training in written translation; spoken interpretation techniques to facilitate high quality cross-cultural communication. Not open to native speakers except with permission. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

380 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Typically offered Spring. S, F grading.

405 Advanced Conversation 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: Spanish 408 or Spanish 407 or concurrent enrollment. Advanced-level conversation practice in small groups with a native speaker. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

407 Advanced Speaking and Listening 3 Course Prerequisite: Spanish 307 with a grade of C or better. Systematic development of speaking and listening proficiency at the advanced level. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

408 [M] Advanced Grammar and Writing 3 Course Prerequisite: Spanish 308 with a grade of C or better. Development of advanced proficiency in writing. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

420 [CAPS] [M] Cultural Topics 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Variable content on Peninsular and/or Latin American cultural topics, including US Latino Societies. Taught in English. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

430 Masterpieces in Spanish Literature 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Taught in English. Variable topic seminar on Spanish literature. Typically offered Spring.

450 [CAPS] [M] Seminar in Spanish Studies - Themes 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Two SPANISH 300-level courses excluding SPANISH 305; junior standing. Seminar on important themes in Spanish studies. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

451 [M] Seminar in Spanish Studies - Authors 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Two SPANISH 300-level courses excluding SPANISH 305. Seminar on important authors in Spanish studies. Taught in Spanish.

452 [M] Seminar in Spanish Studies - Genres 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Two SPANISH 300-level courses excluding SPANISH 305. Seminar on important genres in Spanish studies. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Fall.

453 [M] Seminar in Spanish Studies: Linguistics 3 Course Prerequisite: Two SPANISH 300-level courses excluding SPANISH 305. The nature of Spanish language, history, dialects, phonetics, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, bilingualism and phonology. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

480 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

550 Medieval Literature 3 Selected works. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

551 Seminar in Golden Age Literature 3 Reading and discussion of representative works of the Spanish Golden Age. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

552 Topics in Nineteenth-Century Spanish Literature 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Selected works and topics. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

553 Topics in Twentieth-Century Spanish Literature 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Selected works and topics. Taught in Spanish. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

554 Seminar in Spanish Literature and/or Culture V 1-3 May be repeated for credit. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

555 Seminar in Colonial Spanish American Literature 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Seminar on conquest and colonial literature in Hispanic America. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

556 Seminar in Nineteenth-Century Spanish American Literature 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Study of nineteenth-century Spanish American Literature. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

557 Seminar in Twentieth-Century Spanish American Literature 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Study of twentieth-century Spanish American literature and culture. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

558 Seminar in Spanish American Literature and/or Culture V 1-3 May be repeated for credit. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

559 Special Topics in Hispanic Studies and/or Linguistics V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Special interdisciplinary topics in Hispanic studies and/or linguistics. Typically offered Spring.

560 Beginning Instructional Practicum 2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. An introduction to foreign language instruction for beginning teaching assistants. Typically offered Fall.

561 Advanced Instructional Practicum 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Supervised practical experience in foreign language teaching. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

597 Graduate Internship V 1 (0-3) to 6 (0-18) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: SPANISH 560; FOR LANG 540; minimum GPA of 3.50. Supervised internship experience relating to career objectives; portfolio assignment required. S, F grading.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

Student Affairs Schedules of Classes Commencement Veteran's Affairs Summer Session
 
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