The Washington State University Catalog

Department of Crop and Soil Sciences

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

Department of Crop and Soil Sciences

css.wsu.edu
Johnson Hall 115
509-335-3475

Professor and Department Chair, R. T. Koenig.

CROP SCIENCE: Professors, I. C. Burke, K. S. Gill, S. Hulbert, P. W. Jacoby, S. S. Jones, D. Lyon, M. M. Neff, W. F. Schillinger; Associate Professors, A. H. Carter, S. C. Fransen, K. M. Murphy, M. O. Pumphrey, Z. Zhang; Assistant Professors, M. L. Friesen, C. Neely, K. Sanguinet.

SOIL SCIENCE: Regents Professor, J. Reganold; Professors, L. Carpenter-Boggs, M. Flury, W. L. Pan; Associate Professors, D. Brown, T. S. Sullivan; Assistant Professors, D. Griffin, G. LaHue, H. Neely, H. Tao; Teaching Assistant Professors, L. Brueggeman, I. Madsen, C. Perillo.

AGRICULTURE AND FOOD SYSTEMS: Professor, J. Goldberger; Assistant Professor, A. Warner, H. Henning; Senior Instructors, J. D. Baser, J. Durfey.

ADJUNCT and AFFILIATE FACULTY: R. Abi-Ghanem, B. Baik, H. Bolton, R. A. Boydston, R. Bricklemyer, C. Campbell, P. Castiglione, W. Chen, D. Cobos, D. Collins, H. Collins, C. Coyne, N. Embertson, A.M. Fortuna, K. Garland-Campbell, R-A. Hernan Mauricio, J. Hu, D. Huggins, M. Islam, D. Jarvis, R. C. Johnson, A. Kennedy, T. Kisha, J. Lafferty, X. Liu, R. McGee, P. N. Miklas, C. F. Morris, F. Muehlbauer, S. Norberg, C. D. Pannkuk, J. Payumo, C. Pierce, C. Qualset, C. Reardon, S. Rustgi, M. Saglam, Z. Shi, G. K. Stahnke, C. Steber, J. D. Streubel, F. L. Young, L. Yu.

PROFESSORS EMERITI: R. Allan, D. Bezdicek, J. Burns, C. G. Cogger, J. R. Davenport, B. E. Frazier, S. O. Guy, J. B. Harsh, W. J. Johnston, A. Kleinhofs, S. Kuo, T. Lumpkin, T. W. Miller, F. Pierce, R. G. Stevens, M. K. Swan, S. E. Ullrich.

The Department of Crop and Soil Sciences supports undergraduate programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Science interdisciplinary degrees in Integrated Plant Sciences and Agricultural and Food Systems.  Students are encouraged to participate as part-time employees in research programs and seek professional internships for experiential learning experiences. Departmental and college scholarships are available based on ability, need, and interest. Students gain professional and social contacts with the faculty and other students through student clubs and other activities.  Students planning to transfer to Washington State University should take courses that meet general university and Integrated Plant Sciences or Agricultural and Food Systems core requirements.

Undergraduate minors in Crop Science, Soil Science, Geospatial Analysis, and Agricultural and Food Systems, as well as an undergraduate Certificate in Organic Agriculture, are also available.

We offer graduate programs of study leading to the degrees of Master of Science in Crop Science, Master of Science in Soil Science, Doctor of Philosophy (Crop Science), and Doctor of Philosophy (Soil Science). A graduate Certificate in Sustainable Agriculture is also available.

INTEGRATED PLANT SCIENCES

The science of plant life from molecule to market is the focus of the new Integrated Plant Sciences (IPS) Degree program. Delivered collaboratively by departments within the College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences, the IPS degree provides students with an exciting depth and breadth of knowledge that crosses a variety of plant science disciplines, including crop and soil sciences, horticulture and landscape architecture, entomology, plant pathology, and food science. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree in Integrated Plant Sciences may choose among seven majors. Information regarding the IPS majors, including student learning outcomes, is available under the Integrated Plant Sciences catalog section and http://ips.wsu.edu.

Agricultural Biotechnology

The Agricultural Biotechnology major in IPS is a designed for students interested in careers that include laboratory or research technicians in plant biotechnology, breeding, genetics, entomology, plant pathology, molecular biology, and physiology, as well as for students preparing for advanced degrees in these areas. The program emphasizes the development and application of new technology to ensure a safe and abundant food and fiber supply. Students may find employment in industry, government, or university laboratories.

Field Crop Management

The Field Crop Management major in IPS is ideal for students interested in agronomy, crop production, and plant, soil, and pest management. Crop scientists (or agronomists) are involved in improving food, feed, and fiber production. Graduates qualify for careers in agribusiness, corporate and technical farm management, professional consulting, research, and sales positions.  

Turfgrass Management

The Turfgrass Management major in IPS is geared toward students interested in pursuing careers as golf course managers, athletic field managers, or personnel managers in those venues. Students will take courses in turf management, turf production, plant pathology, entomology, soil fertility, and plant breeding to learn how to maintain healthy turfgrass systems. Additionally, students gain hands-on experience at the Palouse Ridge Golf Course, an 18-hole championship golfing facility at the Pullman campus.

AGRICULTURAL FOOD SYSTEMS

The Agricultural and Food Systems (AFS) program is an exciting, college-wide, interdisciplinary program that offers a Bachelor of Science degree with five majors and a Master of Science degree. Information regarding the AFS majors, including student learning outcomes, is available in the Agricultural and Food Systems catalog section and http://afs.wsu.edu.

Agricultural Education

Combining the best of both agriculture and teaching, the Agricultural Education major in AFS prepares students to educate the next generation of agricultural leaders and consumers. Highly sought after by employers, they teach high school and middle school agricultural science classes, as well as serve as FFA advisors, adult education instructors, community outreach coordinators, university extension agents, and agricultural industry representatives.

Agricultural Technology and Production Management

Students in the Agricultural Technology and Production Management hands-on major in AFS gain a science-based overview of agriculture and food systems, with an emphasis on the practical application of technology to agricultural production systems. The program combines students’ inherent creativity and interest in physical and biological sciences, technology, mathematics, business, and related subjects with their desire to develop innovative solutions to a variety of agricultural problems.

Organic and Sustainable Agriculture

Significantly different than conventional agriculture, organic food production is one of the fastest growing segments of agriculture, with retail sales generally increasing by 10 to 20 percent annually since 1991. Washington State has been a leader in this burgeoning new industry. This revolutionary new major is the first of its kind to be offered in the United States. Students in the Organic and Sustainable Agriculture major in AFS take a diverse array of courses in the natural, environmental, economic, and social sciences, as well as a number of courses focused on organic production practices.

PREPARATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN CROP AND SOIL SCIENCES

Preparation for graduate study requires the selection of courses that will benefit later work toward a Master of Science or a Doctor of Philosophy degree. Normally, preparation for an advanced degree in crop science includes course work with a strong emphasis in plant sciences, biochemistry, computer science, genetics, and statistics.  Preparation for an advanced degree in soil science includes course work in chemistry, physical sciences, statistics, and soil science.




Minors

Crop Science

A minor in crop science may be obtained by students from this and other departments. A minimum of 16 credit hours for the minor must include 9 hours of upper-division work taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. See crop science advisor.


Geospatial Analysis

The minor requires a minimum of 16 semester credits including the following core: SOIL SCI 368, 374, and SOIL SCI 468/568; and 6 credits from the following: AGTM 305, 405, CPT S 111,  MIS 250, SOE 446, 464, 486, with a minimum GPA of at least 2.0 in the required courses. Exceptional students may take graduate-level courses with instructor permission.  Courses used for the minor in geospatial analysis may not be used for the minor in soils sciences.  At least 9 credits must be 300-400-level work taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.


Soil Science

A minor in soil science may be obtained by students from this and other departments. Sixteen credits in soil science are required, at least 9 of which must be in 300-400-level courses taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. SOIL SCI 201 is required. One credit of Soil Science-related experiential learning (SOIL SCI 495, 498, or 499) is required. See soil science advisor for other soil science options.



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Crop Science (CROP_SCI)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


102 Introduction to Cultivated Plants 3 Exploring cultivated plant classification and morphology, crop reproduction, basic plant processes, and the biotic and abiotic factors which can influence these processes. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 102, CROP SCI 102). Typically offered Fall.

202 Crop Growth and Development 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: HORT/ CROP SCI 102. Morphology, anatomy, growth and development of agronomic and horticultural crops. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 202, CROP SCI 202). Typically offered Spring.

301 Turfgrass Management 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 102, 106, 107, or 120. Principles of establishment and management of turf for lawns, parks, and golf courses. Field trip required. Typically offered Even Years - Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

302 Forage Crops 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 102, 106, 107, 120, or 135. Adaptation, production, and utilization of forage crops. Field trip required. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

305 Ecology and Management of Weeds 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: HORT 202 or AFS 201. Weed ecology/management in crop and non-crop systems; weed growth/development, identification, weed control (chemical, mechanical, biological), and environmental issues Typically offered Fall.

350 International Agricultural Extension 3 Course Prerequisite: AFS 101; sophomore standing. Understanding of agricultural extension systems globally through online international collaborative project. Typically offered Summer Session.

360 World Agricultural Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: 3 units of [B] or [BSCI] GER or UCORE categories. Study of agro-environmental characteristics of world agriculture; historical and contemporary features of world food production. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 360, SOIL SCI 360). Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

401 [M] Turfgrass Science 3 Course Prerequisite: CROP SCI 301. Integration of the principles of turfgrass science into turf management for environmental stewardship of turfgrass systems. Typically offered Even Years - Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

403 Advanced Cropping Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: HORT 202. Understanding the management of constraints to crop production and quality; biological, physical, and chemical approaches to crop health management. Field trips required. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 403, CROP SCI 503, PL P 403, PL P 503.) Credit not granted for both CROP SCI 403 and 503, or PL P 403 and 503. Recommended preparation: CROP SCI 305; PL P 429. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

411 [M] Crop Environment Interactions 3 Course Prerequisite: HORT 202. Effects of environment and management on crop growth and development. Typically offered Fall.

412 Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit. Current literature and reports on research or special topics. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 412, SOIL SCI 412). Typically offered Spring.

425 [CAPS] [M] Trends in Integrated Plant Sciences 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Critical examination of current impacts and future trends in plant sciences. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 425, CROP SCI 425.)

435 [CAPS] Interdisciplinary Solutions to the Plant Sciences 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Investigation of current agricultural problems and development of proposed solutions through interdisciplinary teams using advanced technology and production management. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

443 Plant Breeding for Organic Agriculture 3 Course Prerequisite: HORT 202; BIOLOGY 106 or 120. Concepts and practice of breeding in and for organic agriculture with an emphasis on field-based, on-farm techniques. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

445 [M] Plant Breeding 4 Genetic principles underlying plant breeding and an introduction to the principles and practices of plant breeding. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 445, HORT 445). Typically offered Even Years - Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

480 Plant Genomics and Biotechnology 3 Course Prerequisite: MBIOS/BIOLOGY 301. Advanced concepts in plant genomics and biotechnology with emphasis on approaches, techniques, and application. (Crosslisted course offered as HORT 480, CROP SCI 480). Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 420 or HORT 416. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

495 Research Experience V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: Not open to graduate students. Planned and supervised undergraduate research experience. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 495, HORT 495, SOIL SCI 495). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

497 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-15 May be repeated for credit. S, F grading.

498 Professional Internship V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 hours. Planned and supervised professional work experience. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

503 Advanced Cropping Systems 3 Understanding the management of constraints to crop production and quality; biological, physical, and chemical approaches to crop health management. Field trips required. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 403, CROP SCI 503, PL P 403, PL P 503.) Credit not granted for both CROP SCI 403 and 503, or PL P 403 and 503. Recommended preparation: CROP SCI 305; PL P 429. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

504 Plant Transmission Genetics 3 Transmission of genes across generations; detailed study of the basic laws of genetics to predict and describe inheritance. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

505 Advanced Classical and Molecular Breeding 3 Characterization and principles of improving crop quality and adaptation traits with emphasis on molecular breeding strategies. Required preparation must include upper-division course in biology, genetics, or plant breeding. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

506 Research Presentations 2 Learn and practice skills needed to prepare and effectively present scientific information orally to a range of audiences in a variety of formats and technologies. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 506; SOIL SCI 506). Typically offered Fall.

510 Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit. Literature review; preparation and presentation of reports in crop science. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

511 Science Writing Workshop 2 Instruction, tools, and peer review support to write graduate research proposal or journal article. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 511, ENTOM 511, SOIL SCI 511). Typically offered Spring.

512 Topics in Crop Science V 1-2 May be repeated for credit. Concepts of plant breeding, seed physiology, and technology; crop physiology and management. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

545 Statistical Genomics 3 (2-3) Develop concepts and analytical skills for modern breeding by using Genome-Wide Association Study and genomic prediction in framework of mixed linear models and Bayesian approaches. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 545, ANIM SCI 545, BIOLOGY 545, HORT 545, PL P 545.) Recommended preparation: BIOLOGY 474; MBIOS 478. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

555 Epigenetics in Plants 2 Understanding principles of epigenetics in plants with a focus on its role in understanding and improving plant genomes and their adaptation to the changing environment. Recommended preparation: General genetics. Typically offered Even Years - Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Crop Science PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


Soil Science (SOIL_SCI)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 Organic Gardening and Farming 3 Principles and production practices of organic gardening and farming. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

201 [BSCI] Soil: A Living System 3 Biological, chemical, and physical properties of soils; fundamentals of soil ecology, soil-water-plant relations, soil fertility, and soil genesis. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

202 [BSCI] Introductory Soil Science Laboratory 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 201 or concurrent enrollment. Hands-on experience with biological, chemical, and physical properties/processes of soils including: sampling and evaluating, working with data, and exploring methodology. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

302 [M] Introduction to Agroecology 3 Agroecological crop production through case study analyses and applications of ecological principles in traditional and modern farming systems. (Crosslisted course offered as SOIL SCI 302, AFS 302). Recommended preparation: SOIL SCI 201. Typically offered Spring.

303 Organic and Sustainable Agricultural Certifications: From Principles to Practice 2 Principles and practical requirements for certification under the USDA National Organic Program and other certifications focused on sustainable agricultural practices. Typically offered Fall.

303 (Effective through Summer 2021) Organic and Sustainable Agricultural Certifications: From Principles to Practice 2 Principles and practical requirements for certification under the USDA National Organic Program and other certifications focused on sustainable agricultural practices. Typically offered Fall.

360 World Agricultural Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: 3 units of [B] or [BSCI] GER or UCORE categories. Study of agro-environmental characteristics of world agriculture; historical and contemporary features of world food production. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 360, SOIL SCI 360). Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

368 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: 3 credits of [BSCI] or [PSCI] UCORE. Introduction to geographic information systems applied to landscape data; geographic coordinate systems and projections, make maps and use geodatabases. Typically offered Fall.

374 Introduction to Remote Sensing 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: 3 credits of [BSCI] or [PSCI] UCORE. Physical basis of remote sensing, fundamentals of aerial photography and image analysis applied to agriculture, forestry, wildland management problems. Typically offered Spring.

412 Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit. Current literature and reports on research or special topics. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 412, SOIL SCI 412). Typically offered Spring.

414 Environmental Biophysics 2 Physical environment of living organisms (temperature, humidity, radiation, wind); heat and mass exchange and balance in plant and animal systems. Recommended preparation: Introductory biology, physics, and calculus. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

415 Environmental Biophysics Laboratory 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 414 or concurrent enrollment. Experimental methods and procedures in environmental measurements; temperature, wind, radiation, and humidity measurements in biological environments. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

416 Soil Processes in the Earth's Critical Zone 3 Soil geochemistry and processes; theory and applications with a focus on reactions at the solid, liquid, and gaseous interface between the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. (Crosslisted course offered as SOE 416/516, SOIL SCI 416/516). Credit not granted for both SOE/SOIL SCI 416 and SOE/SOIL SCI 516. Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge of soils (e.g. SOIL SCI 201 or equivalent; CHEM 106; PHYSICS 102). Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

441 Soil Fertility 3 Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 201. Nutrient management impacts on crop productivity, soil and water quality; mineral requirements; soil testing; plant analysis; inorganic and organic fertilizers. Typically offered Spring.

442 Soil Fertility Laboratory 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 441 or concurrent enrollment. Laboratory exercises and methodology for characterization of soil fertility and chemistry including CEC, acidity, carbon, nitrogen, and plant nutrients. Recommended preparation: CHEM 220. Typically offered Spring.

443 [M] Soil Management for Sustainable and Organic Farming Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 201. Principles and practices of agricultural soil management to support soil health; sustainable methods for organic and non-organic production. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

452 The Landscape of Soil 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 201. The study of soils as natural bodies, including morphology, formation, and classification. A five-day field trip is required. Typically offered Spring.

468 GIS Spatial Analysis 4 (2-6) Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 368. Geographic information systems applied to analysis of landscape data; maps, geographic coordinate systems and projections, geodatabases. Credit not granted for both SOIL SCI 468 and 568. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

478 Advanced Organic Farming and Gardening 2 Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 101. Advanced training in organic certification and planning for organic farming. Typically offered Spring.

479 Organic Farm and Garden Field Management 2 Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 478. Advanced training in production management for organic farms and gardens. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

480 Practicum in Organic Agriculture V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 478 or concurrent enrollment. Applied principles and practices of organic agriculture; immersion and participation in all required farming/gardening activities. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

495 Research Experience V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: Not open to graduate students. Planned and supervised undergraduate research experience. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 495, HORT 495, SOIL SCI 495). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

498 Professional Internship V 1-6 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 hours. Planned and supervised professional work experience. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

501 Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit. Presentation of research information. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

502 Advanced Topics in Soils V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Interpretation, presentation, and discussion of current research on soils, uses, and management. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

503 Advanced Topics in Soil Analysis V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: By permission only. Soil research techniques; application of modern instrumentation to soil analysis. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

505 Teaching Practicum 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Supervised experience in classroom teaching; classroom preparation for lectures, discussions, laboratories; preparation and grading of exams. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

506 Research Presentations 2 Learn and practice skills needed to prepare and effectively present scientific information orally to a range of audiences in a variety of formats and technologies. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 506; SOIL SCI 506). Typically offered Fall.

508 Environmental Spatial Statistics 3 Theoretical introduction and practical training in spatial data analysis for graduate students in the environmental sciences. (Crosslisted course offered as SOIL SCI 508, STAT 508). Required preparation must include undergraduate statistics through applied multiple regression. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

511 Science Writing Workshop 2 Instruction, tools, and peer review support to write graduate research proposal or journal article. (Crosslisted course offered as CROP SCI 511, ENTOM 511, SOIL SCI 511). Typically offered Spring.

513 Environmental Soil Physics 3 Physical properties of soils and their relationships to moisture, aeration, and temperature; plant-soil-atmospheric relationships; solute transport and soil salinity. Recommended preparation: SOIL SCI 201 and general physics. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

513 (Effective through Summer 2021) Environmental Soil Physics 3 Physical properties of soils and their relationships to moisture, aeration, and temperature; plant-soil-atmospheric relationships; solute transport and soil salinity. Recommended preparation: SOIL SCI 201 and general physics. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

514 Environmental Biophysics 2 Physical environment of living organisms (temperature, humidity, radiation, wind); heat and mass exchange and balance in plant and animal systems. Recommended preparation: Introductory biology, physics, and calculus. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

515 Environmental Biophysics Laboratory 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: SOIL SCI 514 or concurrent enrollment. Experimental methods and procedures in environmental measurements; temperature, wind, radiation, and humidity measurements in biological environments. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

516 Soil Processes in the Earth's Critical Zone 3 Soil geochemistry and processes; theory and applications with a focus on reactions at the solid, liquid, and gaseous interface between the lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. (Crosslisted course offered as SOE 416/516, SOIL SCI 416/516). Credit not granted for both SOE/SOIL SCI 416 and SOE/SOIL SCI 516. Recommended preparation: Basic knowledge of soils (e.g. SOIL SCI 201 or equivalent; CHEM 106; PHYSICS 102). Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

521 Physical Chemistry of Soils 3 Chemical equilibrium and kinetics of soil solution speciation, mineral precipitation and dissolution, adsorption and partitioning reactions, and ion exchange. Soil constituents; soil solutions: mineral equilibria; absorption reactions; acid/base reactions; oxidation-reduction; soil contaminants. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

531 Soil Microbiology 3 (2-3) Biology and significance of organisms inhabiting soil and their role in nutrient cycling, ecosystem function, agriculture, and bioremediation. Typically offered Even Years - Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

533 Advanced Vadose Processes 2 Methods and models for water, heat, vapor and solute transport in the vadose zone; transfer functions to describe solute transport; non-linear parameter estimation; fate and transport of water, heat, and solutes in the vadose zone; hydrological and geochemical processes in unsaturated subsurface materials. Recommended preparation: upper division or graduate course in soil physics or chemistry. Typically offered Even Years - Fall.

541 Soil-Plant-Microbial Interactions 3 Soil-plant-microbial relationships to plant nutrition, plant health, and environmental cleanup; rhizosphere chemistry and microbial ecology. Required preparation must include two upper-division courses in biology, microbiology or soils. Typically offered Odd Years - Fall.

544 Nitrogen Cycling in the Earth's Systems 3 Nitrogen dynamics in terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric systems; nitrogen transformations in natural and managed systems and responses to human activities. (Crosslisted course offered as BIOLOGY 544, SOIL SCI 544).

547 Soil Fertility Management 3 Philosophy of fertilizer recommendations based on soil and plant tissue testing; principles of fertilizer manufacture, placement and use. Required preparation must include introductory soils and upper-division soil fertility courses. Typically offered Even Years - Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

568 GIS Spatial Analysis 4 (2-6) Geographic information systems applied to analysis of landscape data; maps, geographic coordinate systems and projections, geodatabases. Credit not granted for both SOIL SCI 468 and 568. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Soil Science PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

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