The Washington State University Catalog

School of Economic Sciences

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

School of Economic Sciences

ses.wsu.edu
Hulbert 101
509-335-5555

Director and Regents Professor, J. J. McCluskey; Associate Director and Professor, A. Espinola-Arredondo; Regents Professor, R. C. Mittelhammer; Professors, R. G. Batina, T. R. Fortenbery, G. I. Galinato, R. K. Gallardo, H. A. Love, B. Mandal, T. L. Marsh, V. A. McCracken, F. Munoz-Garcia, J. Yan, J. K. Yoder; Associate Professors, J. Bai, M. P. Brady, J. H. Cook, B. W. Cowan, S. Ortigueira; Assistant Professors, W. Blundell, J. Luckstead, S. Manian; Research Professor, E. L. Jessup; Associate Research Professor, D. Moore; Assistant Research Professor, T. P. Nadreau; Clinical Associate Professors, M. J. Gibson, P. Kuzyk, A. J. Prera; Clinical Assistant Professor, E. R. Gurocak; WSU Extension Professor, J. S. Neibergs; Professors Emeriti, K. Casavant, R. E. Rosenman, C. R. Shumway, P. R. Wandschneider.

The School of Economic Sciences (SES) offers programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Economic Sciences with options in Agricultural Economics; Business Economics; International Economics and Development; Economics, Policy and Law; Environmental and Resource Economics; Financial Markets; and  Quantitative Economics. Graduate degrees offered include the Master of Science in Economics, Master of Applied Economics, Doctor of Philosophy in Economics, and Doctor of Philosophy in Agricultural Economics.

The School also advises the Bachelor of Science in Agricultural and Food Systems, the Agricultural and Food Business Economics major.

Undergraduate Program

The course of study for the Bachelor of Science in Economic Sciences is sufficiently broad to accommodate students with a variety of interests and career goals. It provides training for students interested in business, law, finance, agricultural markets, environmental policy and natural resources, and economic development. The program also gives students the preparation needed for graduate study in business, law, agricultural economics, finance, and general economics. The program provides students the flexibility to choose courses outside the School of Economic Sciences while still meeting degree requirements and allows students to pursue double majors in such fields as business, math, or political science.

The degree requires a set of core courses taken by all School of Economic Sciences undergraduate students. These courses develop a deep understanding of the basic principles of economics and the research methods needed for economic analysis in any field of economic sciences. Students then branch out to further apply the core tools in one of seven option areas:

  • The agricultural economics option deals with economic issues related to food and fiber supply and demand and the natural resource base that supports agricultural production and societal needs. Applications to public decision making and private decisions of farms, ranches, and agribusinesses are considered.
  • The business economics option trains students to use economic concepts and data analysis skills to analyze management, marketing, and finance problems faced by businesses operating in a market system.
  • The international economics and development option provides students an understanding of how policies, institutions and endowments influence physical, human, and natural capital accumulation which leads to the emergence of poor and rich communities and countries.
  • The economics, policy and law option provides students with the analytical skills used in law school and policy-making including those relevant in tax, law, regulation, program, and policy arenas.
  • The environmental and resource economics option trains students to make decisions while weighing the trade-offs between protecting, restoring, developing, and allocating natural resources.
  • The financial markets option provides students with analytical and quantitative training in the substantial overlap between economics and finance. The option requires coursework that focuses on the analysis of financial markets.
  • The quantitative economics option provides students with the skills to understand and use more advanced statistical and mathematical models, preparing them for careers involving data analytics or for advanced degrees -- such as a Master of Science or Ph.D. in economics, agricultural economics, or related field.

In all options, students combine course work in economic sciences with courses outside the School of Economic Sciences. According to their individual interests, students supplement their economic sciences training with elective coursework in many areas including agricultural sciences, business, computer science, engineering, environmental science, history, mathematics, philosophy, political science, and statistics.

The School of Economic Sciences also advises the college-wide Agricultural and Food Business Economics major.  This major focuses on agricultural business with an emphasis in economics.  Please visit http://afs.wsu.edu for more information.

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates from the School of Economic Sciences will evaluate and apply economic concepts and quantitative methods; will think critically, integrate concepts, and evaluate results in performing economic analyses; and will communicate effectively.  Students will be able to apply economic concepts, together with quantitative methods and technical information relating to the decision environment, to assist policy makers and target groups in evaluating economic trade-offs and in making rational economic decisions. Graduates will also be capable of analyzing and evaluating broad economic and social problems concerning the allocation of individual, firm and social resources within their specific degree interest area.  Students will be capable of communicating the results of economic analyses in a clear, compelling, and informative manner.

A wide variety of courses is available to non-majors who want to take selected courses to support their programs in other departments. Students from other departments may declare a minor in economics, agribusiness economics, business economics, environmental and resource economics and management, or sustainable development (see below).

The school advises for the interdisciplinary sustainable development minor that addresses how economic and social systems interact with major resource and environmental issues, both internationally and domestically. This is an interdisciplinary program with participation by the departments such as Anthropology, Architecture, Economics, International Business, Political Science, the School of the Environment, and Sociology. The program is built on the premise that as a society we have a responsibility to ourselves and to future generations to steward resources in ways that foster long-term environmental and socio-cultural health and economic viability for all peoples.

Transfer Students

Students planning to transfer to Washington State University from other institutions should take courses that meet the 100- and 200-level course requirements in economics, mathematics, accounting, English, communication, and University Common Requirements (UCORE). Students planning to transfer into economic sciences by the end of their sophomore year should have satisfactorily completed the required introductory economics, statistics, and mathematics courses if they plan to complete the required work for a degree in two additional years.

Preparation for Graduate Study

Students planning to pursue graduate study in economics or agricultural economics are urged to select the quantitative economic option and consult with a faculty member in the School of Economic Sciences.  All options, however, prepare students for graduate school but are less quantitatively focused.

Students planning graduate study are advised to develop strong skills through courses in English composition, and additional work in statistics and mathematics. Coursework recommendations for specific graduate areas include:

  • Law School: ACCTG 230; B LAW 210; PHIL 103, 201; POL S 300; and, depending on legal interests, elective Econ courses from the following: ECONS 322, 324, 327, 425, 451; B LAW 411 suggested.
  • Business School: ACCTG 230, 231; MIS 250. Additional courses in business are not required for admission to most graduate schools of business. It might be useful, however, to take introductory courses in the major areas of business: B LAW 210, FIN 325, MGTOP 340, MKTG 360, ECONS 352 and ECONS 452.
  • Economics and Agricultural Economics: MATH 171 and 220 are recommended to satisfy the major’s math requirements. MATH 172, 273, STAT 360 are also useful. A good grade in courses such as ECONS 301, 302, 311 (B+ or higher) and in electives such as ECONS 424 or 425 is also expected for students seeking to be admitted at Masters and PhD program in Economics and Agricultural Economics. 
  • Public Administration: ACCTG 230 and POL S 340; MIS 250 and POL S 443, 446 recommended. Elective: ECONS 322.

Employment Opportunities

The undergraduate program provides the basic knowledge and tools necessary to secure professional positions in a wide range of industries and public organizations. Some students take graduate work to broaden their career opportunities. School of Economics Sciences graduates compete favorably for jobs in government, business, and non-governmental organizations, using their strong analytical skills to offer a different perspective for problem-solving and decision-making.  Recent graduates have been employed in finance, banking, agribusiness, industry, internet-based companies, non-profit organizations, government agencies, and at universities.  Many are working in foreign countries.

Graduate Program

All School of Economic Sciences graduate degree programs classify as STEM (CIP Code 45.0603: Econometrics and Quantitative Economics) for international student VISA purposes. 

The Master of Applied Economics degree program will train students to be industry leaders in quantitative economic analysis. Students will graduate with strong knowledge and skills in economic analysis, applied econometrics, and data analytics. The degree includes courses that teach machine learning and data science. Students will enhance their skills in communicating economic findings based on investigations of data to industry-type audiences.  Students in this program should expect to find employment in private corporations, government, consulting, banks, NGOs, and related entities. 

The Master of Science in Economics provides specialization and research experience appropriate for positions in private corporations and government service as management specialists, policy analysts, forecasters or economic consultants. Students may also use this degree to prepare for doctoral studies in economics or related fields.  Students can focus their studies in general economics, business economics or agribusiness, or environmental and resource economics by selecting supporting and elective courses.

The School of Economic Sciences offers two doctoral programs – the Ph.D. in Economics and the Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics.  Both degrees prepare students for careers as professional economists in academic, government, international organizations, or the private sector.  The program provides students with an excellent foundation in the theory and methods of economics along with applications in their choice of at least two Ph.D. fields.  To further strengthen their quantitative training, students may simultaneously pursue a Master of Science in statistics.




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Agricultural Economics (120 Credits)

Students are admitted to the Agricultural Economics option upon making their intention known to the department. Admitted students must meet the following two benchmarks to remain in good standing:
  1. Minimum WSU Cumulative GPA of 2.0.
  2. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in ECONS 301, 302, and 311.

First Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Humanities [HUM]3
MATH 20113
Electives3
Second TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] 3
ECONS 101 or 1023
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 202 [QUAN]23
Concentrated Area Course 33
Second Year
First TermCredits
CHEM 101 [PSCI] OR CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
COM 102 [COMM], COM 210 [COMM], or H D 205 [COMM]3 or 4
Diversity [DIVR]3
ECONS 3023
Concentrated Area Course 33
Second TermCredits
ACCTG 2303
Arts [ARTS]3
BLAW 2103
ECONS 3013
STAT 212 or MGTOP 2154
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
ACCTG 2313
Concentrated Area Course 33
ECONS 311 [M]3
Sequence Course43
Electives1
Second TermCredits
Concentrated Area Course 33
ECONS 335 OR FIN 3253
Sequence Course43
Electives6
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 4313
ECONS 483, 495, 497, 499, or HONORS 4503
ECONS 490 [CAPS] [M]3
ENGLISH 301, 402 [M], or 403 [M] 3
Sequence Course43
Second TermCredits
Sequence Course43
400-level ECONS Elective53
Electives9

Footnotes
1MATH 201 will be waived with an ALEKS score of 80% or higher, or the completion of MATH 202 or equivalent. Alternative to MATH 201 is MATH 106, 172, or 220.
2Alternative to MATH 202 is MATH 171.
3Concentrated Area Courses: Four courses from any one of the following concentration areas: (1)Agricultural Production: ANIM SCI 101, HORT/CROP SCI 102 or ENTOM 150, CROP SCI 360, MGTOP 340; (2) Real Estate & Land Management: FIN 325, 345, 445 [M], MIS 250; (3) Food Safety & Policy: FS 110, 201, 220, 303; (4) Globalization: two semesters foreign language, ECONS 327/I BUS 470, ECONS 428, 430, SOC 415; (5) Sustainability: CROP SCI 360, ECONS 326/SOC 375, SOE 110, 285; (6) Independent Concentration - upon approval of advisor.
4Pick two sequences (4 courses): ECONS 350 + 450 [M]; or ECONS 351 + 451; or ECONS 352 + 452 [M].
5Any 400-level ECONS course not used to fulfill major requirements.

Business Economics (120 Credits)

Students are admitted to the Business Economics option upon making their intention known to the department. Admitted students must meet the following two benchmarks to remain in good standing:

  1. Minimum WSU Cumulative GPA of 2.0.
  2. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in ECONS 301 or 305, 302, and 311.
First Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI]13
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Humanities [HUM]3
MATH 20123
Second TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI] (with lab)14
ECONS 101 or 1023
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 202 [QUAN]33
Electives2
Second Year
First TermCredits
COM 102 [COMM], COM 210 [COMM], or H D 205 [COMM]3 or 4
Diversity [DIVR]3
ECONS 301 or 3053 or 4
Electives6
Second TermCredits
300-400-level ECONS Elective43
Arts [ARTS]3
ECONS 3023
STAT 212 or MGTOP 2154
Electives2
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
300-400-level ECONS Elective43
ACCTG 2303
ECONS 311 [M]3
ECONS 3233
Electives3
Second TermCredits
400-level ECONS Elective43
ECONS 3203
ECONS 3353
ECONS 3523
Concentrated Area Course 53
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 452 [M]3
ECONS 483, 495, 497, 499, or HONORS 45063
ENGLISH 301, 402, or 4033
Concentrated Area Course 53
Electives3
Second TermCredits
400-level ECONS Elective43
ECONS 4253
ECONS 490 [CAPS] [M]3
Concentrated Area Course 53
Electives3

Footnotes
1For a total of 7 credits—one Biological Sciences [BSCI] and one Physical Sciences [PSCI] course, including one lab course.
2MATH 201 will be waived with an ALEKS score of 80% or higher, or the completion of MATH 202 or equivalent. Alternative to MATH 201 is MATH 106, 172, or 220.
3Alternative to MATH 202 is MATH 171.
4ECONS courses not used to fulfill major requirement.
5Concentrated Area Courses - Completion of three courses from one of the following concentration areas: (1) Agribusiness: ECONS 351, 426, 451; (2) Marketing and Analytics: MKTG 360, two 300-400-level MKTG courses (6 credits); (3) Management: MGMT 301, two 300-400-level MGMT courses (6 credits); (4) Supply Chain Management: ECONS 426, MGTOP 340, one 300-400-level MGTOP or MGMT course.
6Minimum 3 credits required.

Economics, Policy and Law Option (120 Credits)

Students are admitted to the Economics, Policy and Law option upon making their intention known to the department. Admitted students must meet the following two benchmarks to remain in good standing:
  1. Minimum WSU cumulative GPA of 2.0.
  2. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in ECONS 301, 302, and 311.
First Year
First TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI]13
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
MATH 20123
Second TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI] (with lab)14
ECONS 101 or 1023
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 202 [QUAN]33
PHIL 103 [HUM]3
Second Year
First TermCredits
COM 102 [COMM], 210 [COMM], or H D 205 3 or 4
ECONS 3014
Policy or Law Emphasis Course43
Electives5
Second TermCredits
300-400-level ECONS Electives56
ECONS 3023
STAT 212 or MGTOP 2154
Electives1
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 311 [M]3
ECONS 3203
ECONS 322 [M]3
ECONS 323, 324, or 3303
Electives3
Second TermCredits
Diversity [DIVR]3
Policy or Law Emphasis Courses46
Electives6
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 4313
ECONS 483, 495, 497, 499, or HONORS 4503
ECONS Option Course63
ENGLISH 301, 402 [M], or 403 [M]3
Policy or Law Emphasis Course43
Second TermCredits
ECONS 400-level Elective3
ECONS 4203
ECONS 490 [CAPS] [M]3
ECONS Option Course63
Electives3

Footnotes
1For a total of 7 credits—one Biological Sciences [BSCI] and one Physical Sciences [PSCI] course, including one lab course.
2MATH 201 will be waived with an ALEKS score of 80% or higher, or the completion of MATH 202 or equivalent. Alternative to MATH 201 is MATH 106, 172, or 220.
3Alternative to MATH 202 is MATH 171.
4Policy or Law Emphasis course selection: (1) Policy: ECONS 430, POL S 316, 416, and PHIL 472 [M]; (2) Law: POL S 300; one of PHIL 360, 365, or 370; and two of PHIL 201, POL S 101, 206, 402, 404 [M], or CRM J 320
5ECONS courses not used to fulfill major requirement.
6ECONS Option Courses: ECONS 424, 425, 427, or 451

Environmental and Resource Economics (120 Credits)

Students are admitted to the Environmental and Resource Economics option upon making their intention known to the department. Admitted students must meet the following two benchmarks to remain in good standing:
  1. Minimum WSU cumulative GPA of 2.0.
  2. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in ECONS 301, 302, and 311.
First Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Humanities [HUM]3
MATH 20113
Electives3
Second TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI]23
ECONS 101 or 102 3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 202 [QUAN]33
Electives3
Second Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI] (with lab)24
COM 102 [COMM], COM 210 [COMM], or H D 205 [COMM]3 or 4
Diversity [DIVR]3
ECONS 3023
ECONS 322 [M]3
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
ECONS 3014
STAT 212 or MGTOP 2154
Concentrated Area Course 43
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 300-400-level Elective3
ECONS 311 [M]3
ECONS 3303
Concentrated Area Course 43
Electives3
Second TermCredits
ECONS 300-400-level Elective3
ECONS 3263
Concentrated Area Course 43
Electives6
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 4273
ECONS 4303
ECONS 4313
ECONS 483, 495, 497, 499, or HONORS 4503
Environmental Option Course 53
Second TermCredits
ECONS 490 [M] [CAPS]3
ENGLISH 301, 402, or 4033
Environmental Option Course53
Electives6

Footnotes
1MATH 201 will be waived with an ALEKS score of 80% or higher, or the completion of MATH 202 or equivalent. Alternative to MATH 201 is MATH 106, 172, or 220.
2For a total of 7 credits—one Biological Sciences [BSCI] and one Physical Sciences [PSCI] course, including one lab course.
3Alternative to MATH 202 is MATH 171.
4Concentrated Area Course: Three courses from any one of the following concentration areas: (1) Human Health & the Environment: ANTH 405, CE 341, IPM 452, PHIL 370, SOE 402, SOE 445; (2) Global Environment: CROP SCI 360, HISTORY 494, PHIL 370, SOC 332, SOE 285, SOE 315, SOE 335; (3) Renewable Resources: Forest, Wildlife & Biosystems: BIOLOGY 330, BIOLOGY 401, CROP SCI 411, PHIL 370, SOE 300, SOE 301, SOE 312; (4) Non-Renewable Resources: Energy & Minerals: PHIL 370, PHYSICS 408, SOE 340, SOE 350, SOE 470; (5) Independent Concentration - upon approval of advisor (choose 3 courses).
5Environmental Option courses: COMSOC 476 or 477, SOE 444, SOE 438, SOIL SCI 368.

Financial Markets (120 Credits)

Students are admitted to the Financial Markets option upon making their intention known to the department. Admitted students must meet the following two benchmarks to remain in good standing:
  1. Minimum WSU cumulative GPA of 2.0.
  2. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in ECONS 301, 302, and 311.
First Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Humanities [HUM]3
MATH 20113
Electives3
Second TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI]23
ECONS 101 or 1023
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 202 [QUAN]33
Electives3
Second Year
First TermCredits
ACCTG 2303
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI] (with lab)24
COM 102 [COMM], COM 210 [COMM], or H D 205 [COMM]3 or 4
ECONS 3023
MIS 2503
Second TermCredits
ACCTG 2313
Arts [ARTS]3
ECONS 3014
MGTOP 2154
Third Year
First TermCredits
Diversity [DIVR]3
ECONS 311 [M]3
ECONS 3203
ECONS 3223
Electives3
Second TermCredits
ECONS 300-400-level Elective3
ECONS 4203
FIN 3253
Financial Markets Option Required Course43
Electives3
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 300-400-level Elective3
ECONS 483, 495, 497, 499, or HONORS 4503
ENGLISH 301, 402 [M], 403 [M]3
FIN 421 OR 4273
Electives3
Second TermCredits
ECONS 400-level Elective3
ECONS 425 or 4273
ECONS 490 [M] [CAPS]3
Financial Markets Option Required Course43
Electives3

Footnotes
1MATH 201 will be waived with an ALEKS score of 80% or higher, or the completion of MATH 202 or equivalent. Alternative to MATH 201 is MATH 106, 172, or 220.
2For a total of 7 credits—one Biological Sciences [BSCI] and one Physical Sciences [PSCI] course, including one lab course.
3Alternative to MATH 201 is MATH 106, 172, or 220; alternative to MATH 202 is MATH 171.
4Financial Markets option (6 credits): Approved courses include ECONS 424, FIN 350, 456, STAT/MATH 360, one 400-level FIN course, and one 400-level ECONS course not used to fulfill major requirements.

International Economics and Development (120 Credits)

Students are admitted to the International Economics and Development option upon making their intention known to the department. Admitted students must meet the following two benchmarks to remain in good standing:
  1. Minimum WSU cumulative GPA of 2.0.
  2. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in ECONS 301, 302, and 311.
First Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 101 [SSCI] OR 102 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Humanities [HUM]3
MATH 20113
Electives3
Second TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI]23
ECONS 101 or 1023
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 202 [QUAN]33
Electives3
Second Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI] (with lab)24
COM 102 [COMM], COM 210 [COMM], or H D 205 [COMM]3 or 4
Diversity [DIVR]3
ECONS 3023
Electives3
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
ECONS 300-400-level Elective 3
ECONS 3014
STAT 212 or MGTOP 2154
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 300-400-level Elective3
ECONS 311 [M]3
ECONS 3223
ECONS 3243
ECONS 3273
Second TermCredits
ECONS 300-400-level Elective3
ECONS 3203
ECONS 3233
ECONS 3263
ECONS 4203
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
Economics Option Requirement43
ECONS 400-level Elective3
ECONS 4273
ECONS 4313
ECONS 483, 495, 497, 499, or HONORS 4503
Second TermCredits
Economics Option Requirement43
ECONS 490 [M] [CAPS]3
ENGLISH 301, 402 [M], or 403 [M]3
Electives6

Footnotes
1MATH 201 will be waived with an ALEKS score of 80% or higher, or the completion of MATH 202 or equivalent. Alternative to MATH 201 is MATH 106, 172, or 220.
2For a total of 7 credits—one Biological Sciences [BSCI] and one Physical Sciences [PSCI] course, including one lab course.
3Alternative to MATH 202 is MATH 171.
4Economics Option Requirements: Two courses from the following: IBUS 380, ECONS 330, ECONS 428, ECONS 430, POL S 435, SOC 340.

Quantitative Economics (120 Credits)

Students are admitted to the Quantitative Economics option upon making their intention known to the department. Admitted students must meet the following two benchmarks to remain in good standing:
  1. Minimum WSU cumulative GPA of 2.0.
  2. Cumulative GPA of 2.0 or higher in ECONS 301, 302, and 311.
First Year
First TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI] (with lab)14
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
Second TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI] or Physical Sciences [PSCI]13
ECONS 101 or 1023
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 1724
Electives3
Second Year
First TermCredits
COM 102 [COMM], 210 [COMM], or H D 205 [COMM]3 or 4
Diversity [DIVR]3
Economics Emphasis Course22 or 3
ECONS 3014
Humanities [HUM]3
Second TermCredits
Arts [ARTS]3
Economics Emphasis Course23
ECONS 3023
MATH 2202
STAT 212 or MGTOP 2154
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
Economics Emphasis Course23
ECONS 300-400-level Elective33
ECONS 311 [M]3
Electives6
Second TermCredits
ECONS 300-400-level Elective33
ECONS 4203
ECONS 4243
Electives6
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ECONS 400-500-level Elective33
ECONS 483, 495, 497, 499, or HONORS 4503
MATH 364, 401, or ECONS 5263
MATH 420 or ECONS 527 3
Electives3
Second TermCredits
ECONS 400-500-level Elective33
ECONS 490 [CAPS] [M]3
ENGLISH 301, 402 [M], or 403 [M]3
STAT 360, 443, or ECONS 525 3
Electives3

Footnotes
1For a total of 7 credits—one Biological Sciences [BSCI] and one Physical Sciences [PSCI] course, including one lab course.
2Economics Emphasis Courses (3 courses required from one area): (1) Math: MATH 273, 301, and 315; (2) Management Operations: MGTOP 340, 412, and 452; (3) Computer Science: CPT S 121, 122, and 224.
3ECONS courses not used to fulfill major requirement.


Minors

Agribusiness Economics

The minor in Agribusiness Economics requires 18 credits and includes ECONS 101; ECONS 301 or 305; ECONS 350 and 450, or ECONS 351 and 451, or ECONS 352 and 452; ECONS 335; and 3 elective credits in ECONS.  9 credits of upper-division work must be taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. A 2.0 GPA is required in the minor and no courses may be taken pass/fail.


Business Economics

To be admitted to the business economics minor, students must have a cumulative 2.0 GPA.  A minor in Business Economics requires 18 credits of ECONS courses, nine of which must be at the 300-400 level  and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.  ECONS 101 and 102 (or 198 and a 300-400-level ECONS course), 305 or 321, 320, 326 or 327, and 404 are required. A 2.0 GPA is required in the minor and no courses may be taken pass/fail.


Economics

To be admitted to the economics minor, students must have a cumulative 2.0 GPA. A minor in Economics requires 18 credits of ECONS courses, nine of which must be at the 300-400-level taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. ECONS 101 and 102 (or 198 and a 300/400-level ECONS courses), and 302 or 320 are required. In addition, ECONS 301 or 305, and two 300-level or higher ECONS electives are required (only three hours of ECONS 497 or 499 may be used to fulfill the upper-division ECONS electives requirement).  A 2.0 GPA is required in the minor and no courses may be taken pass/fail.


Environmental and Resource Economics and Management

The minor in Environmental and Resource Economics and Management requires a minimum of 18 credits. The following courses are required: ECONS 101, 301 or 305, 326, and 330; one of ECONS 430, 431, or 433; and 3 elective credits in ECONS. 9 hours of upper-division work must be taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.  A 2.0 GPA is required in the minor and no courses may be taken pass/fail.  A student wishing to declare a minor should consult with an advisor as early as possible to develop the required program.


Sustainable Development

The program offers a minor in sustainable development. The minor is comprised of ECONS 326, one course from each of the following four aspect areas: policy, history, and theory (HISTORY 409, 494, PHIL 370, POL S 430, PSYCH 466, SOE 335 [M], or 438); environmental (ARCH 490, 494, BIOLOGY 330, 372 [M], CE 401, CROP SCI 360, SOE 110, 285, 300, 303, or 483); social/cultural (ANTH 203, 309, ANTH/SOC 418, SOC 331, 332, 415, 430, SOE 312, WGSS 332, or WGSS 460); economic (ECONS 330, 427, 428, 430, 431, I BUS 380, or I BUS 496); and one additional course from any of the aspect areas. The minor requires 18 credits, with at least 9 credits at the 300-400 level taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.  A 2.0 GPA is requried in the minor and no courses may be taken pass/fail.  Students wishing to apply for the minor may do so with the School of Economic Sciences.



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Economic Sciences (ECONS)

Fall 2021 Spring 2022 


101 [SSCI] Fundamentals of Microeconomics 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 101, MATH 103 (or higher) or concurrent enrollment, MGTOP 215, STAT 205, STAT 212 or concurrent enrollment, or a minimum ALEKS score of 40%. Enrollment not allowed if credit earned for ECONS 198 with a C or higher and ECONS 102. Theory and policy of human responses to scarcity; how this affects business competition, international trade, industrial organization, investment, and income distribution. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

102 [SSCI] Fundamentals of Macroeconomics 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 101, MATH 103 (or higher) or concurrent enrollment, MGTOP 215, STAT 205, STAT 212 or concurrent enrollment, or a minimum ALEKS score of 40%. Enrollment not allowed if credit earned for ECONS 198 with a C or higher and ECONS 101. Theory and policy related to unemployment, inflation, foreign trade, government spending, taxation, and banking. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

105 Introduction to Economic Sciences Seminar 1 For new undergraduate economics majors, an introduction to advising, study options and program of study planning, degree completion, and career planning. Typically offered Fall.

198 Economics Honors 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Honors College. Enrollment in ECONS 198 is not allowed if credit has already been earned for ECONS 101 and 102. Introduction to economic theory and policy issues. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

299 Topics in Economics 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101, 102, or ALEKS math placement score of 45%. Issues in economics. Typically offered Spring.

301 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory with Calculus 4 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198; MATH 171 with a C or better, or MATH 202 with a C or better. Calculus-based intermediate microeconomic theory for majors in the School of Economic Sciences. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

302 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 102 or 198; MATH 171 with a C or better, or MATH 202 with a C or better. Income, employment, and inflation theory with policy implications. Recommended preparation: ECONS 101 as required background. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

305 Intermediate Microeconomics without Calculus 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. Price determination and market behavior under different market structures and the problems posed for public policy; not calculus-based. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

311 [M] Introductory Econometrics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101, 102, or 198; STAT 212, 360, or MGTOP 215; MATH 171 with a C or better, or MATH 202 with a C or better. Methods of empirical analysis in the context of economic analysis and forecasting problems. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

320 Money and Banking 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 102 or 198. Analysis of banking institutions and monetary policy in the US, with comparison to abroad. Recommended: ECONS 101. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

321 Economics of Sports in America 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. Economic aspects of American sports; fan demand; advertising; team output decisions; league/conference organization; government and sports. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

322 Public Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. Theory and practice of the public sector; taxes, expenditures, and administration at local, state, and federal levels. Typically offered Fall.

323 Labor Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. Functioning of labor markets; introduction to collective bargaining and labor law. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

324 [M] The Economics of Health Care 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. The economics of allocating, financing and delivering medical care services. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

325 [M] The Economics of Organization, Contracting, and Law 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. Examination of the economic and legal aspects of contractual and non-contractual ways of organizing transactions by business.

326 Aspects of Sustainable Development 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. Ecological, economical, and sociological aspects of sustainable development. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 326, SOC 375). Typically offered Spring and Summer.

327 International Trade and Finance 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198; ECONS 102 or 198. Analysis and description of international trade flows; commercial policy; multinational firms, foreign exchange markets; open economy macroeconomics; international monetary systems. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 327, I BUS 470).

329 The Economics of Gaming 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101, 102, 198, or a minimum ALEKS math placement score of 45%. Exploration of the critical role that economics plays in the design, development, and success of modern electronic games. Typically offered Spring.

330 Natural Resource Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. The role of economics in natural resource management and policy. Course equivalent to OSU's AREC 351. Typically offered Fall.

335 [QUAN] Business Finance Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 101 with a C or better, 103 with a C or better, 106, 171, 201, 202, or a minimum ALEKS math placement score of 45%. Financial management, decision making, and analysis for small businesses; capital market institutions and valuation processes. Typically offered Spring.

350 Introduction to Farm and Ranch Management 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. Decision making, planning, implementation and control of farms and ranches using economic principles, records, financial reports, budgeting and investment analysis. Typically offered Fall.

351 Introduction to Food and Agricultural Markets 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. Introduction to futures and options; selected topics related to markets for and the marketing of food and agricultural products. Typically offered Fall.

352 Business Management Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198. Introduction to the economic concepts, techniques and applications of organizational, marketing, financial, operations, and resource management in a firm. Typically offered Spring.

391 Special Topics in Economics V 1-3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198; ECONS 102 or 198. Current topics in economics. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

404 Economics for Managers 3 Topics in the application of economics for business decision making with an introduction to calculus. Credit not granted to graduate students in the School of Economic Sciences. Typically offered Summer Session.

420 Monetary Theory and Policy 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301; ECONS 302. Current issues in monetary economics with a special emphasis on policy. Typically offered Spring.

424 Strategy and Game Theory 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301. Strategic behavior of firms, consumers, and political parties in everyday interaction. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

425 Industrial Organization 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301 or 305. Economic theories of firm behavior and the influence of market industry parameters; buyer/seller concentration, information asymmetries, product differentiation, and entry conditions.

426 Transportation Economics and Supply Chain Analysis 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301 or 305; ECONS 311. In-depth analysis and application in transport economics, modeling, and policy evaluation across all transportation modes.

427 Economic Development 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301 or 305. Development theories, policies, and performance of Third World economies; population, land reform, foreign trade, aid, investment, debt, dependency.

428 [DIVR] Global Capitalism Today: Perspectives and Issues 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101, 102, or 198. Logic and consequences of capitalism as global system; multinational corporations; underdevelopment and overdevelopment; external debt, population, and environmental crisis.

430 Managing the Global Environment 3 Study of policy and management tools to address environmental issues of global significance.

431 Economic Analysis of Environmental and Natural Resource Policies 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301. Nature and practice of environmental policy analysis using economics concepts and the analysis of models applied to natural resource problems and issues.

433 Topics in International Environmental Law, Policy and Institutions 3 Interdisciplinary study of the political development of the European Union and its impact on modern Italy; natural resource, environmental and agricultural policy and law. Typically offered Spring.

450 [M] Advanced Farm and Ranch Management 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 101 or 198; ECONS 350. Business and financial principles applied to organization and operation of farms and ranches. Typically offered Spring.

451 Advanced Food Economics and Marketing 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301, 305, or 351; ECONS 311. Institutions, practices, policies, problems, and empirical analysis of food economics and marketing. Typically offered Spring.

452 [M] Advanced Business Management Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301 or 305; MATH 171 or 202; MGTOP 215 or STAT 212. Topics in business management economics and strategy, from demand and supply to bargaining, contracting, pricing strategies, and market structure. Recommended preparation: ECONS 350 or ECONS 352 as required background. Typically offered Fall.

453 International Trade and Marketing 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301; ECONS 311. Application of economic theory to the analysis of international trade and marketing. Typically offered Spring.

483 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-15 May be repeated for credit. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

490 [CAPS] [M] Economics Capstone 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301 or 305; ECONS 302; ECONS 311; average of these courses needs to be a 2.0 GPA or better. Integration of economic theory and field courses; assessment. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

491 Advanced Topics in Economics V 1-3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 301; ECONS 302; ECONS 311. Advanced topics in economics. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

495 Instructional Practicum V 1-3 Academic experience in teaching and tutoring undergraduate courses in economics. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

497 Economics Internship V 2-12 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Professional off-campus internships arranged or coordinated by departmental faculty according to student's field of specialization. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

500 Macroeconomic Theory I 3 Introduction to dynamics, growth and investment, overlapping generations models, Ramsey model, consumption and investment. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 500, FIN 500). Required preparation must include intermediate macroeconomics and one year of calculus. Required preparation must include intermediate macroeconomics and one year of calculus. Typically offered Fall.

501 Microeconomic Theory I 3 Microeconomic theory, multivariate optimization, consumer and producer theory, competitive partial equilibrium, introduction to imperfect competition. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 501, FIN 501). Required preparation must include intermediate microeconomics and one year of calculus. Required preparation must include intermediate microeconomics and one year of calculus. Typically offered Fall.

502 Macroeconomic Theory II 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 500. Macroeconomic theory, short-run fluctuations and nominal rigidities, monetary economics and inflation, real business cycle models, unemployment international macroeconomics. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 502, FIN 502). Typically offered Spring.

503 Microeconomic Theory II 3 General equilibrium, welfare economics and social choice, market failure, game theory, economics of information. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 503, FIN 503). Typically offered Spring.

504 Production and Consumption Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503. Advanced duality topics, demand and supply system modeling, financial economics and risk. Typically offered Fall.

505 Economics for Agricultural Decision Making 3 Managerial economics with specific applications to agricultural issues.

506 Mathematics Primer for Economists 3 Intensive overview of the essential mathematical tools needed for graduate study in topics of economic sciences. Typically offered Fall.

509 Quantitative Methods in Economic Dynamics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 511. Basic numerical methods of optimization, equation solving, function approximation, numerical dynamic programming, random number generation and simulation, and the solution of dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models; econometric estimation methods of nonlinear structural economic models, including Bayesian Estimation, Generalized Method of Moments, Indirect Inference, and Simulated Method of Moments. Typically offered Fall.

510 Statistics for Economists 3 Statistical theory underlying econometric techniques utilized in quantitative analysis of problems in economics and finance. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 510, FIN 510). Required preparation must include college calculus and matrix algebra. Required preparation must include college calculus and matrix algebra. Typically offered Fall.

511 Econometrics I 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 510. Single equation linear and nonlinear models; estimation, inference, finite and asymptotic properties, effects and mitigation of violations of classical assumptions. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 511, FIN 511). Typically offered Spring.

512 Econometrics II 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 501; ECONS 511. Econometric methods for systems estimation; simultaneous equations, discrete and limited dependent variable, panel data, and time series data. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 512, FIN 512). Typically offered Fall.

513 Econometrics III 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 512. Linear and non-linear models and maximum likelihood estimation and inference; semi-parametric and parametric methods; limited dependent variable models. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

514 Econometrics IV 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 512. Constrained estimation, testing hypotheses, bootstrap resampling, BMM estimation and inference, nonparametric regression analysis, and an introduction to Bayesian econometrics. Typically offered Odd Years - Spring.

521 Topics in Economic Sciences V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Current topics in the development and application of the economic sciences. Required preparation must include intermediate micro- and macro-economics, and econometrics course work. Typically offered Fall.

522 Financial and Commodity Derivatives 3 Design, trading, structure, and pricing of derivatives; working knowledge of how derivative securities work, how they are used, and how they are priced. Typically offered Spring.

523 Big Data Management and Processing for Economics 3 Introduction to data management and processing; efficient collection, storage, cleaning, version control, and data analysis; effective programming for achieving these goals. Recommended preparation: one 3-credit introductory statistics course. Typically offered Summer Session. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

523 (Effective through Spring 2021) Big Data Management and Processing for Economics 3 Introduction to data management and processing; efficient collection, storage, cleaning, version control, and data analysis; effective programming for achieving these goals. Recommended preparation: one 3-credit introductory statistics course. Typically offered Summer Session. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

524 Applied Machine Learning for Economics 3 Introduction to machine learning algorithms and concepts; supervised and unsupervised learning methods; foundational theory and application to data; statistical and computational methods. Recommended preparation: linear algebra, calculus, and statistics with calculus. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

524 (Effective through Summer 2021) Applied Machine Learning for Economics 3 Introduction to machine learning algorithms and concepts; supervised and unsupervised learning methods; foundational theory and application to data; statistical and computational methods. Recommended preparation: linear algebra, calculus, and statistics with calculus. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

525 Master's Econometrics 3 Theory and practice of multiple regression methods; applications to the study of economic and other phenomena; use of computer regression programs. Required preparation must include introductory statistics course. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

526 Mathematical Economics with Applications 3 Linear algebra, matrix algebra, calculus-based analysis of consumer and producer theory, comparative statistics, and constrained optimization. Required preparation must include intermediate microeconomics and calculus course work. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

527 Microeconomic Analysis 3 Consumer and producer behavior; partial and general equilibrium; game theory; imperfectly competitive markets; and market failures. Required preparation must include intermediate microeconomics and calculus course work. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

528 Master's Macroeconomics Analysis 3 Master's-level course to develop a coherent theoretical framework to interpret macro data and to analyze macro policy. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

529 Research Methods V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 3 hours. Prepare and communicate professional-quality research with an emphasis on learning how to identify, develop, write, and present research. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

532 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics 3 Economic principles and models applied to natural resource and environmental problems, issues, and policies. Typically offered Spring.

533 International Trade and Policy 3 International trade theories, policies, and research issues related to world trade with emphasis on agricultural commodity markets. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

534 Production Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 526. Production economics theory and methods applied to problems of production response, economic optimization, technology, policy, risk and dynamics. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

536 Applied Statistics and Econometrics for Economics and Finance 3 Data and problem driven approach to formulating, estimating, and interpreting models that address problems in the area of finance and financial economics; review relevant basic statistics and probability concepts, and apply these to linear regression, regression diagnostics, and time series econometrics. Recommended preparation: 3-credit introductory statistics (MGTOP 215); 3-credit microeconomics or macroeconomics course; 3-credit mathematics with calculus course; 3-credit introductory finance course. Typically offered Summer Session.

555 Managerial Economics for Decision Making 3 Course Prerequisite: Admission to the MBA program. Optimal economic decision making for business in a global environment. Not open to economics graduate students.

571 International Trade 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 511. Recent developments in trade theory and policy, including international factor movements, empirical analysis of trade flows and strategic trade policies. Typically offered Fall.

572 International Development 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 511. Structural and two-sector growth models of developing countries and countries in transition; empirical estimation of sources of growth. Typically offered Spring.

581 Natural Resource Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 511. Economic dynamics of natural resource systems. Typically offered Fall.

582 Environmental Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 511. Economic theory for environmental issues; externalities, property rights, and welfare analysis; policy design and implementation; non-market valuation and cost/benefit analysis. Typically offered Spring.

583 Public Sector Economics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 511. Public sector and public choice economics, including government debt and tax policy, public decision making, bureaucratic behavior and rent-seeking, with applications. Typically offered Spring.

593 Applications in Microeconomic Topics 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 511. Applied topics in healthcare, sports, transportation and other markets. Typically offered Spring.

594 Theory of Industrial Organization 3 Course Prerequisite: ECONS 502; ECONS 503; ECONS 511. Theory of market structure and firm behavior, including price and non-price competition, information and strategic behavior, and technological change. (Crosslisted course offered as ECONS 594, FIN 594). Typically offered Fall.

596 Advanced Topics in Financial Economics 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admission to PhD programs in business, or ECONS 500 and ECONS 501. Topics may include financial theory and empirical methods as applied to financial management, investments, international finance, and markets/institutions. (Crosslisted course offered as FIN 596, ECONS 596). Typically offered Fall and Spring.

598 PhD Research Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Seminar focusing on PhD students presenting their own research and critically assessing the research of other PhD students. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

599 Special Topics in Economics 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 3 hours. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

701 Master's Independent Capstone Project and /or Examination V 1-6 May be repeated for credit. Capstone project or final examination for professional master's degree under the Graduate School. The credits will include a balloted evaluation of the student's completion of the program's capstone/examination requirements by the program's graduate faculty. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and obtain approval from their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 701 credit. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Agricultural Economics or Economics PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

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