The Washington State University Catalog

College of Nursing

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

College of Nursing

nursing.wsu.edu
Spokane
509-324-7360

Interim Dean and Professor, Mel Haberman; Interim Executive Associate Dean, and Associate Dean for Research and Associate Professor, C. Barbosa-Leiker; Interim Executive Associate Dean and Professor, R. Hoeksel; Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Clinical Associate Professor, S. Carollo; Vice Dean for Educational Innovation and Clinical Professor, L. Day; Director of Ph.D. Program and Clinical Associate Professor Gail Oneal; Director of Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program and Clinical Associate Professor, A. Mason; Director of Master in Nursing and Certificate Programs and Associate Professor, D. Smart; Director of RN to BSN Program, Professional Development Director and Clinical Associate Professor, W. Williams-Gilbert; Director of Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program and Associate Professor, J. A. Dotson; Associate Dean and Professor, L. Eddy; Assistant Dean for Research and Associate Professor J. Postma; Interim Academic Director and Associate Professor, L. Kaplan; Assistant Dean of Clinical Affairs, D. Brinker; Interim Director Tri-Cities Nursing Program and Instructor, K. Olson; Academic Director of Yakima Nursing Program and Instructor, L. Vickers; Professors, J. Katz, J. Roll; Associate Professors, J. Banasik, P. Eide, J. Purath, B. Severtsen, M. Shaw, K. Shishani, C. Van Son; Assistant Professors, E. Burduli; A. Davis, T. Diede; S. Fritz, J. Graves, L. James, T. Klein, L. Nelson, C. Nguyen-Truong, K. Sinclair, M. Wilson; N. Wood; Research Professor, T. Odom-Maryon; Associates in Research, O. Brooks, N. Elkins-Brown; Clinical Professor, D. Garzon Maaks; Clinical Assistant Professors, C. Chacon, D. DePriest, V. Denson, D. Eti, S. Fincham, N. Lungstrom, M. Rasmor, P. Stover; Senior Instructors, M. Allen, K. Anders, J. Beebe, R. Faubion, L. Hahn, V. Hennessey, L. Jinishian, L. Kifer, S. McFadden, L. Parisot, S. Perkins, L. Punch, L. Wintersteen-Arleth; Instructors, C. Abercrombie, P. Anain, M. Aronow, T. Barenz, R. Baumgarten, D. Beck, L. Berry, L. Bolkovatz, J. Boyer, S. Breckon, R. Carroll, E. Clark, A. Crawford, G. Cronrath, C. Logsdon Douglas, S. Edwards, E. Estes, S. Franco, A. Fulton, S. Griffith, J. Hickman, A. Jenkins, A. Kristofzski, S. Matar-Curnow, K. Mitchell, K. Munro, P. Orebaugh, J. Oswald, L. Rahn, C. Risse, B. Sarkinen, V. Sattler, T. Stack, W. Staff, K. Stevens, K. Tietjen, M. Vulcan, C. Warburton, M. Wiedmer, K. White.

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS

The Washington State University College of Nursing was established in 1968.  Since its inception, the College has delivered excellent academic programs, engaged in research and service, and maintained strong partnerships with educational institutions and community healthcare organizations. The College functions as an integrated multi-campus system. Working across campuses, educational, research, and service initiatives strengthen the assets of each campus as well as the College as a whole.

The College of Nursing offers two baccalaureate programs. The Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) undergraduate program is open to students beginning a nursing career. Students in this program complete approximately four academic years of full-time study.  The RN-BSN undergraduate program is open to registered nurses who completed an Associate Degree in nursing and who wish to obtain a baccalaureate degree in nursing. Students in this program complete approximately one year of full time study.

The program of study for both types of students leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). Undergraduate nursing programs at WSU are approved by the Washington State Nursing Care Quality Assurance Commission and nationally accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

BSN Students

Students with no previous preparation in nursing may complete pre-nursing course work (freshman and sophomore years) at Washington State University (Pullman or Tri-Cities campus locations), Eastern Washington University, Whitworth University, or another college or university. Pre-nursing coursework provides the student with a foundation in the natural and social sciences and the humanities. To apply for admission to the college, students must have at least 60 semester hours and all courses prerequisite to nursing completed the term prior to enrollment in the upper division.

The 300-400-level courses in the nursing major (junior and senior years) are offered at the College of Nursing in Spokane, Tri-Cities, and Yakima. These courses provide professional preparation in nursing, balancing course work with supervised clinical practice experiences in hospitals, healthcare organizations, and community settings.  Upon successful completion of the BSN program, graduates are eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX®) to become eligible for licensure as Registered Nurses.

RN – BSN Students

Students who are Registered Nurses may apply to the RN – BSN  program at any time following the completion of their basic Registered Nursing education. The RN – BSN  is offered at all of the WSU campuses.  The program builds on the RN background and includes essential course work in assessment, research, leadership and management, ethics, and community health. Advanced practicum experiences bridge course work and theory with clinical practice.  The program is flexible, offering hybrid course delivery. A current, unencumbered Washington State RN License or eligibility for licensure is required. Applicants must be at junior standing (60 semester hours/90 quarter hours), have completed College of Nursing prerequisite courses and WSU’s University Common Requirements (UCORE) or equivalent course work. Some Associate of Arts (AA), Associate of Science (AS), or Bachelor’s degrees may satisfy these requirements. To apply for admission, consultation with a nursing academic advisor is required.

Transfer Students

All students who plan to transfer to nursing at Washington State University from other institutions should discuss their plans early with their academic advisor so that the pre-transfer program of study will be appropriate to nursing degree requirements. The College of Nursing offers pre-enrollment advising at campus locations in Spokane, Tri-Cities, Vancouver, and Yakima, as well as auxiliary sites in Longview and Walla Walla for Registered Nurses who plan to obtain the BSN from Washington State University.

Student Learning Outcomes

We expect our graduating students will be able to demonstrate competence in the provision of care, develop and apply professional values, develop in the role of the Registered Nurse, and serve as designers, managers, and coordinators of care.

Student learning outcomes for our BSN Programs are: 1) Formulate nursing practice decisions using the foundation of a liberal education and evolving knowledge from nursing science, the biological and behavioral sciences, and the humanities. 2) Apply leadership concepts, skills, and decision-making in the provision of high quality nursing care, healthcare team coordination, and the oversight and accountability for safe care delivery in a variety of settings. 3) Integrate reliable evidence from multiple credible sources of knowledge including basic and health sciences to inform practice and make clinical judgments. 4. Demonstrate skills in using patient care technologies, information systems, and communication devices that support safety and quality nursing practice. 5) Demonstrate basic understanding of the role of nurses in advocating for patients, communities and populations in discussions related to healthcare policy, finance, and regulations. 6) Use inter-and intra-professional communication and collaborative skills to advocate for safe, evidence-based, high quality patient-centered care. 7) Demonstrate basic understanding of the role of health promotion, and disease/injury prevention in improving population health across the lifespan. 8) Demonstrate the values central to nursing practice including: altruism, autonomy, human dignity, integrity, advocacy, social justice and life-long learning. 9) Provide safe, competent, compassionate, ethical, culturally sensitive, and evidence based nursing care to individuals, families, groups, communities and populations through promotion, maintenance and restoration of health; prevention of illness, and physical, emotional, and spiritual support throughout the life span including end of life, and across the continuum of health care environments.

MASTER OF NURSING (MN) PROGRAM

The Master of Nursing (MN) program prepares students for advanced nursing practice with didactics grounded in population health, education, leadership, assessment, pharmacology and pathophysiology. MN students complete courses that promote advanced knowledge and application of AACN MN Essentials. MN graduate students may also complete additional courses to receive a graduate certificate in education, leadership or public health.  MN students complete practicums and capstone projects to solidify the transition from knowledge to application in clinical practice in a variety of settings. Students may be admitted to the post-baccalaureate Master’s in Nursing program after completing a bachelor’s degree in nursing, or may enroll in the RN-to-Master’s in Nursing program after earning an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) and a bachelor’s degree in a field related to nursing. Courses are offered in a hybrid format with face-to-face (3-5 times per semester) and online learning as the cornerstone of our MN program. The MN program (32 core course credits) is offered at five college of Nursing campuses. Most students complete the program in two to three years.

Student Learning Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes that we expect our graduating students to meet are 1) integrate scientific findings from nursing, biopsychosocial fields, genetics/genomics, public health, quality improvement, and organizational sciences for the continual improvement of nursing care across diverse settings; 2) implement organizational and system leadership skills to promote high quality, safe patient care that emphasizes ethical and critical decision making and effective working relationships within a systems perspective; 3) articulate multiple elements of quality, including methods, tools, performance measures, and quality standards, and apply these within an organization; 4) apply research outcomes within the practice setting to resolve practice problems, and work as a change agent to disseminate these results; 5) use patient-care technologies to deliver and enhance care, including communications technologies to integrate and coordinate care; 6) intervene at the systems level through policy development, and employ advocacy strategies to influence health and health care; 7) communicate, collaborate, and consult with other health care professionals as a member or leader of inter-professional teams to manage and coordinate care; 8) apply and integrate broad organizational, client-centered culturally appropriate concepts when planning, delivering, managing, and evaluating evidence for clinical prevention and population care, including services to individuals, families, and aggregates/identified populations; and 9) articulate a broadly defined understanding of nursing practice as any form of nursing intervention that influences health care at the direct and indirect care levels for individuals, populations, and systems, coupled with an advanced level of understanding of nursing and relevant sciences that is integrated into direct and indirect nursing practice.

DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE (DNP) PROGRAM

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program, like other graduate programs offered by the College of Nursing, is open to students seeking advanced education in nursing. The DNP program prepares nurses to be leaders in clinical practice and allows graduates to practice at the most advanced level of nursing. The DNP program provides students with opportunities to work in various health care settings under the guidance of experienced faculty mentors and community experts. An integral part of the program is the completion of the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Project, which provides students with the knowledge and skills to utilize research and leadership in practice. DNP graduates are prepared to translate research and evidence into practice, lead interdisciplinary care teams, measure health-related outcomes, and improve the health of individual patients, groups, populations, and communities.

Prospective students who have earned the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree select one of three areas of emphasis in the DNP Program: Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP), Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP), or Advanced Population Health (APH). Along with completing required didactic coursework, students will complete a minimum of 1,000 practicum hours. Graduates of the FNP and PMHNP programs are eligible to complete a national certification examination leading to state licensure as Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners.

Prospective students who have earned the Master’s degree in Nursing who wish to add an additional specialty (FNP, PMHNP, APH) can work with an adviser for an individualized plan of study.

The DNP program is open to students who hold a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree or a bachelor’s degree in a related field and a Master’s degree in Nursing from an accredited program. Admission is granted on the basis of the student’s 1) undergraduate and, if applicable, graduate GPA; 2) licensure as a registered nurse in Washington state (or, for international students, eligibility for licensure on admission with completion of process before first clinical/practicum course enrollment); 3) recommendations relative to professional nursing competence and prediction of success as a graduate student; and 4) written goal statement congruent with program’s philosophy and focus. A written and/or verbal interview is required for all applicants. International applicants also must meet general Graduate School international applicant requirements.

Please see https://gradschool.wsu.edu/international-requirements/

Students apply to the Graduate School in Pullman, WA. The Graduate Program Office in the College of Nursing provides program information to prospective students and support for current students, including assignment of faculty advisors and support for enrollment and progression.   

Student Learning Outcomes

We expect that DNP graduates: 1) Apply biophysical, psychosocial, behavioral, sociopolitical, cultural, economic, and nursing science to improve health care practice and delivery systems (DNP Essentials I, V,  and VIII); 2) Analyze organizational structure, functions and resources to improve the delivery of care (DNP Essential II); 3) Translate evidence-based research into practice to improve health care delivery and outcomes for all (DNP Essential III); 4) Use information systems/technology to support and improve patient care and healthcare systems  (DNP Essential IV); 5) Advocate for the nursing profession through the development, implementation and evaluation of healthcare policy (DNP Essential V); 6) Collaborate with other health professionals to improve health care access and health outcomes for individuals and populations (DNP Essential VI); 7) Advocate for ethical policies and practice which prevent illness, promote health and social justice, and reduce disparities for patient populations in urban, rural, and global settings (DNP Essential V, VII); 8) Apply advanced knowledge and skills within an area of specialized nursing practice (DNP Essential VIII).

PH.D. IN NURSING PROGRAM

The Ph.D. in Nursing Program began in summer 2007 and admits up to 10 students each summer. The program prepares students to advance the discipline of nursing science through a research-focused program emphasizing innovative approaches and leveraged resources to improve health care. Graduates are equipped to become leaders in nursing education and research, critical roles in today’s health care environment.

Students complete required coursework over 7 semesters using a combination of instructional approaches including face-to-face meetings on the WSU-Spokane campus, live interactive video conferencing, and online learning. All students prepare a dissertation research proposal to meet requirements for the preliminary examination, and complete an independent research study.

The baccalaureate to Ph.D. program includes a “bridge year” consisting of two semesters of preparatory (Master’s level) coursework before beginning the traditional Ph.D. program with the next incoming summer cohort. The required 85 credits can be completed in 9 semesters of study by most students who are attending full-time. Students are selected for the RN-to-Ph.D. program based on the same competitive criteria used for all applicants. However, baccalaureate students will be followed by a program director or designee as they begin the bridge year to help them identify potential advisors and refine research interests early. Please see https://gradschool.wsu.edu/international-requirements/

Students apply to the Graduate School in Pullman. Program information, determination of student interests and goals, and assignment of a faculty advisor are provided by the Ph.D. Program office at the College of Nursing. Priority application deadline for summer admission is October 15, though applications may be taken until April of the starting summer.  Applications to the baccalaureate to Ph.D. program will be taken on a rolling basis, with a typical start date of Fall semester.

Student Learning Outcomes

We expect graduates of the Ph.D. in Nursing program to: 1) contribute to advancing nursing science and practice through clinical research; 2) analyze, construct, and test theoretical frameworks that guide nursing research design, methodology, data analyses, and the transfer of new knowledge into practice; 3) create effective interdisciplinary collaborations to foster research and the transfer of evidence-based knowledge into best clinical practices; 4) synthesize knowledge from a variety of disciplines to create research designs and methods for nursing science and to address ethical, social, cultural, political, and professional issues; 5) implement proven and emerging technologies to enhance nursing research and education; and 6) implement innovative research designs, methodologies, leadership skills, health education, and/or life style modification techniques to address the health care needs of vulnerable populations and disparities in the access to or delivery of health care.




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Nursing (121 Hours)

A grade of C or better is required in all prerequisite courses and nursing courses.

Criteria for admission to the 300-400-level nursing major include an overall cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher and a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or higher in prerequisite courses. Achievement at a "proficient" level or above on the Test of Essential Academic Skills (TEAS) is required for all Pre-licensure applicants. Responses to personal interview questions may be used as additional admission criteria. All pre-licensure applicants are required to have at least 50 hours of volunteer/work health experience and provide a proctored writing sample at interview time.

Part-time schedule of study is available; see advisor.
First Year
First TermHours
Arts [ARTS]3
CHEM 101 [PSCI]4
Diversity [DIVR]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
Second TermHours
BIOLOGY 102 [BSCI], 106 [BSCI], or 107 [BSCI]4
CHEM 1024
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
PSYCH 105 [SSCI]3
SOC 101 or 1023
Second Year
First TermHours
BIOLOGY 2514
Humanities [HUM]3
MBIOS 1014
STAT 212 [QUAN]4
Second TermHours
BIOLOGY 140 or 333 3
BIOLOGY 3154
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
H D 1013
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermHours
NURS 3083
NURS 3114
NURS 3154
NURS 3162
NURS 3173
NURS 3282
Second TermHours
NURS 309 [M]3
NURS 3222
NURS 3232
NURS 3244
NURS 3255
Fourth Year
First TermHours
NURS 4083
NURS 4121
NURS 4143
NURS 4152
NURS 4163
NURS 4172
Second TermHours
NURS 4092
NURS 4243
NURS 4252
NURS 426 [M]2
NURS 4273
NURS 430 [CAPS]3

Nursing - Registered Nurses Option (0 Hours)

Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) Option for Registered Nurses: Required courses: NURS 360, 365, 366, 400, 405, 406, 440, 462, 465, 477, 495, Integrated Capstone/upper-division elective.


Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Nursing (NURS)

(Select Campus to see schedule links)


308 Professional Development I: Evidence Based Practice 3 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. First of professional development series; focus on nursing and health care research, information management, informatics, and development of nursing research. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

309 [M] Professional Development II: Ethical Reasoning and Decision Making Processes in Nursing 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 308; NURS 315 or concurrent enrollment. Continuation of professional development series; moral/ethical reasoning models, decision processes, and philosophical basis of nursing as a discipline. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

311 Pathophysiology and Pharmacology in Nursing 4 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations of common human dysfunction; nursing implications for prevention and therapeutic approaches including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

315 Nursing Practice: Health and Illness 4 (0-12) Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Introduction to nursing practice and health assessment: professional values, core competencies, core knowledge and role development. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

316 Introduction to Nursing Practice in Health and Illness: Theory 2 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Introduction to nursing concepts and holistic assessment including core professional values, knowledge and competencies for nursing practice. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

317 Health Assessment 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Systematic approach to health assessment of adults emphasizing and incorporating use of nursing process and scientific rationale. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

318 Growth and Development Across the Life Span 3 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Theoretical and conceptual perspectives on human growth and development across the life span. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

322 The Human Experience of Diversity and Health 2 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Explorations of regional, national, and global expressions of health and illness and implications for health care professionals. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

323 Nursing in the Genome Era 2 Genome science and application of genetic and genomic concepts to nursing care. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

324 Nursing Concepts in Acute and Chronic Illness in the Adult 4 Course Prerequisite: NURS 311; NURS 315; NURS 316; NURS 317. Theoretical concepts of acute and chronic illness in the adult as a basis for critical thinking and decision-making in nursing. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

325 Nursing Practice in Acute and Chronic Illness in Adults 5 (0-15) Course Prerequisite: NURS 311; NURS 315; NURS 316; NURS 317; concurrent enrollment in NURS 324. Application of acute/chronic illness concepts in adults as a basis for critical thinking and decision-making in nursing. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

328 Introduction to Gerontological Nursing 2 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Professional values, communication, and functional assessment in care of elders; core knowledge and role development of the gerontological nurse. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

360 Professional Nursing Concepts and Issues 2 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Philosophical, historical, economic, legal/ethical, and professional issues designed for registered nurses to build upon previously acquired professional concepts. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

365 Nursing Concepts: Assessment and Application of Physiological Concepts to Nursing Practice I 2 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Integration of pathophysiological, assessment, pharmacological nursing concepts with diverse client populations; emphasizing neurological, EENT, skin, musculoskeletal, endocrine, and respiratory systems. Typically offered Fall.

366 Nursing Concepts: Assessment and Application of Physiological Concepts to Nursing Practice II 2 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Integration of pathophysiological, assessment, pharmacological nursing concepts with diverse client populations; emphasizing fluid/electrolytes, oncology, GI/GU; cardiovascular; immune system, renal. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

392 Therapeutic Touch: A Nursing Modality of Caring and Healing 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Explores the broad arena of touch as a means of interpersonal communication and as a mechanism for healing using Krieger-Kunz method.

398 Special Topics V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours.

400 [M] Nursing Research, Evidence-Based Practice, and Informatics 3 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Application of informatics skills and research processes to evidence-based clinical practice. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

405 Nursing Leadership 2 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Application of group leadership and management theories to professional nursing practice. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

406 Nursing Management 3 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Management, leadership, and group theories are utilized and applied to the management of nursing and health care. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

408 Professional Development III: Leadership and Management 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 309. Continuation of professional development series; focus on impact of leadership, management, and resource allocation on patient outcomes. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

409 Professional Development IV: Transition to Practice 2 Course Prerequisite: NURS 408; NURS 414; NURS 415; NURS 416; NURS 417. Continuation of professional development series; focus on transition to practice and nursing across health care systems/delivery within global arena. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

412 Family and Community as a Context of Care 1 (0-2) Concepts of family-focused nursing assessment, planning, and interventions with emphasis on referral to appropriate community resources. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

414 Child and Family Health: Theory 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 324; NURS 325; concurrent enrollment in NURS 328. Analysis and evaluation of scientific and theory base for nursing care of children and families. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

415 Children and Families as the Focus of Nursing Care 2 (0-6) Course Prerequisite: NURS 324; NURS 325. Synthesis and application of underlying science and nursing process with the unique population of children and families. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

416 Childbearing Health of the Family 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 324; NURS 325; concurrent enrollment in NURS 328. Care of childbearing families within the context of community; newborn health, and men's and women's reproductive health addressed. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

417 Nursing Care of Childbearing Families 2 (0-6) Course Prerequisite: NURS 324; NURS 325. Nursing care of families during the childbearing continuum and/or acute care settings; combination of clinical and seminar. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

424 Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing Concepts 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 414; NURS 415; NURS 416; NURS 417. Healthy to psychopathological states studied within a nursing framework; includes history, theories, legal/ethical issues of psychiatric/mental health nursing. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

425 Nursing Practice: Psychiatric/Mental Health 2 (0-6) Course Prerequisite: NURS 414; NURS 415; NURS 416; NURS 417; concurrent enrollment in NURS 424. Clinical application of the nursing process with clients experiencing acute and chronic psychiatric/mental health disruptions. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

426 [M] Community Health Nursing Theory 2 Course Prerequisite: NURS 414; NURS 415; NURS 416; NURS 417. Synthesis of nursing and public health concepts with emphasis on community as partner and population-focused practice. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

427 Community Health Nursing Practice 3 (0-9) Course Prerequisite: NURS 414; NURS 415; NURS 416; NURS 417; concurrent enrollment in NURS 426. Promoting the public's health through application of the public health functions; assessment, policy development, and assurance. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

430 [CAPS] Senior Practicum 3 (0-9) Course Prerequisite: NURS 409 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 424 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 425 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 426 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 427 or concurrent enrollment. Clinical and theoretical concepts applied in a concentrated clinical practicum; use of clinical preceptors and student objectives. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

440 [M] Population Health Theory 3 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Synthesizes population-based nursing and public health concepts with a focus on upstream interventions in partnership with the community. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

455 Cultural Safety and Social Justice in Global Society 3 Balance of power in health professional relationships, cultural safety, social justice, and diversity in global society. Typically offered Spring.

456 Narrative Health Care in Clinical Practice 3 Narrative processes of attention, representation, and affiliation experienced by health professional students in clinical encounters. Typically offered Fall.

462 Selected Nursing Concepts: Psychiatric/Mental Health 2 Nursing process with individuals and families experiencing psychiatric/mental health disruptions. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

465 Nursing Practice: Community and Psychiatric Mental Health 3 (0-9) Course Prerequisite: NURS 462 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 440 or concurrent enrollment. Application of community health, public health, and psychiatric/mental health nursing concepts to individuals, families, and communities with identified health needs. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

471 Foundations of Occupational and Environmental Health Practice 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing in any Health Professions program. Fundamentals of occupational and environmental health practice; concepts of prevention, epidemiology, disease prevention and health promotion to explain the underlying causes of occupational illness. Typically offered Fall.

474 Presencing: The Core of a Nurse-Patient Relationship 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. The role of the nurse in the practice of presencing as a primary mechanism of caring and communication. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

476 Health Law: Application to Practice 3 Course Prerequisite: Junior standing. Laws, principles and issues related to regulations of health care professionals, practice settings and public and private programs. Typically offered Summer Session.

477 Health Care Ethics V 2-3 Ethical theories including deontology, teleology, virtue ethics and applicability to ethical dilemmas in nursing. Credit not granted for both NURS 477 and NURS 577. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

478 Plateau Tribes: Culture and Health 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing, Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, or Pharmacy; Junior standing. History, culture, and health care needs of the Plateau Indian tribes; both classroom and practicum experience. Credit not granted for both NURS 478 and NURS 578. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Spring.

479 Advanced Physiology for Clinical Practice 3 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Cellular and system physiology foundational to advanced practice and understanding drug mechanisms of action. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

481 International Health Care 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 315. Study abroad experience in global health care; assessment and evaluation skills in planning and implementing culturally appropriate health care for individuals and communities. Typically offered Summer Session.

490 Basic Dysrhythmia Interpretation/Advanced Cardiac Life Support V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Basic interpretation of common ECG rhythms, dysrhythmias, and application of ACLS dysrhythmia management guidelines.

491 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) and Laboratory Value Analysis and Interpretation 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 311; NURS 324; NURS 325. Analysis/interpretation of common laboratory values; basic interpretation of common ECG rhythms, dysrhythmias, and application of ACLS dysrhythmias management guidelines. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

492 Essentials of Disaster Management for Health Professions 3 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing; junior standing. Implications for disaster management across the health professions; mental health and ethical issues and concerns related to vulnerable populations. Typically offered Summer Session.

495 [CAPS] Nursing Practice: Advanced Clinical Practicum 3 Course Prerequisite: Certified major in Nursing. Application and integration of theoretical content in an area of nursing practice of special interest to the student. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

497 Special Topics in Nursing V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

498 Special Topics in Nursing V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

501 Psychiatric Assessment, Diagnosis, and Management of Children and Adolescents 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 530; NURS 562; admission to PMHNP program. Introduction to assessment, diagnosis, and management of psychiatric illnesses common in children and adolescents.

502 Psychiatric Assessment, Diagnosis, and Management of Adults and Geriatrics 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 530; NURS 562; admission to PMHNP program. Introduction to assessment, diagnosis, and management of psychiatric illnesses common in adults and geriatrics.

503 Scientific Inquiry in Nursing 2 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Scientific inquiry applied to theoretical and philosophical foundations in nursing.

504 Evidence-Based Practice 3 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Exploration of evidence-based practice through the conduct of scientific inquiry and application of credible evidence, best practice guidelines, and outcomes management reports.

505 Analytical Foundations for Practice Inquiry 3 Course prerequisite: NURS 503, NURS 504, and admission to Nursing graduate program; or post-master's DNP program. Application of quantitative methods and statistics in current health care to review, describe, and interpret the language of research.

508 Diagnostics and Procedures for Primary Care Practice 2 (1-4) Course Prerequisite: NURS 562 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 563; NURS 581; admission to FNP program. Introduction to the selection and interpretation of diagnostic tests, and performance of minor procedures for primary care practice.

509 Clinical Decision Making: Essential Concepts and Diagnostic Reasoning 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 562 or concurrent enrollment; NURS 563; NURS 581; admission to the FNP program. A primary care framework for conducting systematic clinical encounters, developing differential diagnoses, and planning care for individuals and families.

513 Primary Care I: Health Promotion, Disease Prevention, and Disease Detection Across the Lifespan 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 508; NURS 509; concurrent enrollment in NURS 514. Primary care approaches to health promotion, disease prevention, risk reduction, and disease detection for individuals and families across the life span.

514 Primary Care Practicum 1 2 (0-8) Course Prerequisite: NURS 508; NURS 509; concurrent enrollment in NURS 513. Primary care practicum experience focused on health promotion, disease prevention, and disease detection across the lifespan in primary health care.

515 Primary Care II: Acute Health Conditions Across the Lifespan 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 513; NURS 514; concurrent enrollment in NURS 516. Clinical management and analysis of acute and common conditions presenting in the primary care setting, emphasizing a lifespan approach.

516 Primary Care Practicum II 2 (0-8) Course Prerequisite: NURS 513; NURS 514; concurrent enrollment in NURS 515. Primary care practicum experience focused on acute and common conditions in individuals and families across the lifespan.

518 Translating Evidence into Practice 3 (2-3) Course prerequisite: NURS 553; NURS 565; NURS 591; admission to Nursing graduate program. Development of advanced skills for appraising and applying evidence in advanced practice.

518 (Effective through Summer 2019) Translating Evidence into Practice 3 Course prerequisite: NURS 553; NURS 565; NURS 591; admission to Nursing graduate program. Health related evidence and development of skills to apply evidence in advanced practice. Typically offered Fall.

521 Nursing Education: Teaching, Learning, Assessment, and Evaluation 3 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Exploration of concepts related to teaching and learning, assessment of diverse learning needs, instructional strategies and design, evaluation of performance outcomes.

523 Nursing Education: Curriculum and Accreditation 3 Course prerequisite: NURS 521; admission to Nursing graduate program. Exploration of curriculum and accreditation history, development, future predictions; leadership, and policy development in academic and service settings.

524 Foundations of Methodological Applications for Health Sciences 2 Qualitative and quantitative methods in health care; research, statistics, and interpretation language. Typically offered Summer Session.

526 Analytical Foundations for Health Sciences 3 Quantitative methods, research and statistics in current health care literature. Required preparation must include college-level statistics course. Typically offered Spring.

527 Association, Group Difference and Regression Techniques for Health Services 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 526. Application of quantitative techniques to explore relationships and group differences among variables supporting questions in health science research. Required preparation: Graduate-level statistics course. Typically offered Spring.

528 Multivariate Statistical Techniques for Health Sciences 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 527. Application of quantitative techniques to explore multivariate relationships among variables supporting questions in health science research. Typically offered Fall.

529 Analytical Seminar for Health Science 3 In-depth research methods used for health science research. Typically offered Spring.

530 Theory of Psychopharmacology and Safe Prescribing Practices 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 563; NURS 581. Psychopharmacology across the lifespan for clinical practice including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, principles of prescribing, client education, and outcome monitoring.

531 Culture, Populations, and Family Health Care 3 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Diverse health beliefs and practices of clients, families, and members of the interdisciplinary health care team.

533 Nursing Education: Delivery Methods for Diversity, Inclusion, and Interprofessional Education 3 Synthesis and application of advanced instructional delivery technologies, and best practices in diversity, inclusion, and interprofessional healthcare education.

534 Research Seminar: Grant Development and Critique 3 Seminar focusing on writing a fellowship and/ or grant application and skills for critically reviewing a funded fellowship or grant. Typically offered Summer Session.

535 Philosophy of Nursing Science 3 Course prerequisite: Graduate standing in Nursing; NURS 534 or concurrent enrollment. Structure and organization of fields of knowledge in science including historical and philosophical tenets of inquiry. Typically offered Summer Session.

536 Nursing Theory: Foundations for Knowledge Development 3 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Theory development analysis; theory critique; nursing knowledge examination; impact of theory on nursing science, applied to student's phenomenon of interest. Typically offered Fall.

537 Primary Care III: Chronic Health Conditions Across the Lifespan 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 515; NURS 516; concurrent enrollment in NURS 538. Synthesis of clinical management approaches for care of individuals with chronic and complex conditions across the lifespan.

538 Primary Care Practicum III 2 (0-8) Course Prerequisite: NURS 515; NURS 516; concurrent enrollment in NURS 537. Primary care practicum focused on caring for individuals and families with complex and chronic health conditions across the lifespan.

540 NP Clinical Practicum V 1-10 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 10 hours. Course Prerequisite: NURS 514 or 547. Primary Care Practicum experience requiring the supervised provision of increasingly complex direct patient care.

542 Advanced Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, and Assessment for Population Healthcare Professionals 4 (3-3) Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Advanced assessment, pharmacology, and pathophysiology used by population health nurses.

542 (Effective through Summer 2019) Population Focused Clinical Foundations for Healthcare Educators 3 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Synthesis and application of population health perspectives and educational and instructional best practices in teaching courses foundational to clinical practice.

544 Therapeutic Modalities I: Introduction to Therapies 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 530; admission to PMHNP program. Initial theoretical training in individual and group therapy applicable across lifespan and cross-culturally.

545 Therapeutic Modalities II 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 544. PMHNP practicum experience with focused training in theory of individual and group therapies applicable across lifespan and cross-culturally.

547 Therapeutic Modalities in Practice 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 545. PMHNP practicum clinical experience focused on development of therapy relationships in two modalities.

553 Organizational Systems and Leadership II 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: NURS 576 or concurrent enrollment. Integration of principal dimensions of healthcare policy evaluation, and quality improvement in a constantly changing health care environment.

553 (Effective through Summer 2019) Practicum in Organizational Systems and Leadership 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: NURS 576 or concurrent enrollment. Integration of principal dimensions of healthcare quality improvement and measurement of nurse leaders in a constantly changing health care environment. Typically offered Fall.

554 Epidemiology and Biostatistics for Health Professions 3 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Introduction to epidemiology: principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation including analysis of key elements of investigation of high risk populations. Required preparation must include college-level statistics course.

555 PMHNP Practicum I 3 (1-8) Course Prerequisite: NURS 501; NURS 530; admission to PMHNP program. Psychiatric mental health practicum experience focused on developing initial competency in the comprehensive PMHNP nursing role across the lifespan.

556 Advanced Population Health V 2-6 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Culminating analysis, development, and enactment of advanced practice roles in teaching, practice, or administration of community-based/population-focused nursing.

557 DNP Project I 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: NURS 518; NURS 553; NURS 554. Application of knowledge of current nursing science to the development of a proposal for the final DNP project.

557 (Effective through Summer 2019) Concepts of Practice Transformation 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: NURS 518; NURS 553; NURS 554. Application of knowledge of current nursing science to the development of a proposal for the final DNP project. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

558 DNP Project II 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: NURS 557 with a grade B or better. Development of program design plan and collection of data for the DNP Project.

559 DNP Project III 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: NURS 558 with a grade B or better. Implementation and evaluation of the DNP Project.

560 PMHNP Practicum II 3 (0-12) Course Prerequisite: NURS 501; NURS 502; NURS 555; admission to PMHNP program. Clinical practicum experience focused on ongoing development of proficiency in the comprehensive lifespan PMHNP nursing role.

562 Advanced Health Assessment and Differential Diagnoses 3 (2-3) Course prerequisite: NURS 581 or concurrent enrollment; admission to Nursing graduate program. Applying health assessment and differential diagnostic skills to individuals, families, and populations in rural, urban, and medically under-served areas.

563 Advanced Pharmacology 3 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Pharmacology for clinical practice including decision making, prescribing, drug monitoring, and patient education associated with prescriptive authority.

564 Family Health and Health Promotion of Populations 3 Interprofessional course analyzing the theoretical bases for developing and evaluating health promotion strategies tailored to variations in health behaviors.

564 (Effective through Summer 2019) Health Promotion in Nursing Practice 2 Interprofessional course analyzing the theoretical bases for developing and evaluating health promotion strategies tailored to variations in health behaviors. Typically offered Fall.

565 Information Management for Clinical Practice 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 505; NURS 576; admission to Nursing graduate program. Application/evaluation of nursing informatics; information systems to support clinical research, practice, administration, and education. Required preparation must include competency in word processing/spreadsheets.

566 Community Analysis and Grant Development 2 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Application of core public health functions in community analysis, program development and program evaluation.

573 Rational Prescribing 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 563; admission to FNP program. Pharmacology for clinical practice including decision-making, prescribing, drug monitoring, and patient education associated with prescriptive authority.

576 Organizational Systems and Leadership I 3 (2-3) Course prerequisite: NURS 503 and NURS 504; or admission as a post-master's DNP or PhD student. Analysis of organizational systems and the advanced nurse clinician's role as a leader for change.

577 Health Care Ethics V 2-3 Ethical theories including deontology, teleology, virtue ethics and applicability to ethical dilemmas in nursing. Credit not granted for both NURS 477 and NURS 577. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

578 Plateau Tribes: Culture and Health 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: Admission to Nursing, Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, or Pharmacy graduate programs. History, culture, and health care needs of the Plateau Indian tribes; both classroom and practicum experience. Credit not granted for both NURS 478 and NURS 578. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

581 Advanced Pathophysiology 3 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Etiology, pathogenesis, manifestations, and outcomes of disruption and dysfunction of human physiology.

582 PMHNP Internship 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 555 or admission to PMHNP program. A culminating internship focusing on the provision of comprehensive psychiatric mental health care to individuals and families across the lifespan.

583 DNP Population Health Practicum V 1-5 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 10 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admission to DNP Population Health programs. Application and integration of theoretical content, research, assessment, and intervention strategies into practice.

584 Health Care Law, Policy, and Analysis 3 Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Analysis of health care policy and delivery systems including access, disparity, barriers to care, social justice, vulnerability, and health outcomes.

585 Faculty Role Seminar 3 Analysis of current issues related to the faculty role in nursing education. Typically offered Even Years - Spring.

587 Research Inquiry: Qualitative Methods I 3 Qualitative methodologies, issues and techniques of data collection, analysis and interpretation; issues of ethics and bias. Typically offered Spring.

588 Research Inquiry: Quantitative Methods I 3 Quantitative methodologies, issues and techniques of data collection, analysis and interpretation. Typically offered Fall.

589 Psychometrics in Health Care Research 2 Course prerequisite: NURS 526; NURS 527; 588. Application of psychometric theory and techniques for constructing, analyzing and testing instruments to measure nursing and educational interventions and outcomes. Typically offered Summer Session.

590 Research Inquiry: Quantitative Methods II 2 Course prerequisite: NURS 588; NURS 589. Advanced theoretical and practical application of selected quantitative and methodological strategies.

591 Introduction to Mixed Methods and Evaluation 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 503, NURS 504, and NURS 554; or admission to post-master's DNP program and NURS 554. Program development, implementation, and outcomes evaluation in healthcare, primarily from a mixed methods and perspective.

592 Research Inquiry: Qualitative Methods II 2 Course prerequisite: NURS 587. Application of qualitative methodologies, techniques of qualitative data analysis, presentation of qualitative findings, rigor, data management and research dissemination. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

593 Preliminary Examination Seminar 1 Course prerequisite: PhD in Nursing; completion of 30 core credits; by permission only. Methods to synthesize material from coursework to present and analyze scholarly nursing science knowledge. Typically offered Spring. S, F grading.

596 Nursing Science: Theory and Science of Nursing II 3 Course Prerequisite: NURS 536. Analysis and application of concepts, models, and theories for nursing science research with a focus on vulnerable populations.

597 Advanced Topics in Nursing V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Specialized topics within the discipline; content will vary each term.

598 Advanced Topics in Nursing V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Specialized topics within the discipline; content will vary each term.

599 Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. S, U grading.

799 Dissertation Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit. Course prerequisite: Admission to Nursing graduate program. Best practices for doctoral research and presentation. Typically offered Summer Session. S, F grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Nursing PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.

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