The Washington State University Catalog

School of Design and Construction

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

School of Design and Construction

sdc.wsu.edu
Carpenter Hall 118
509-335-5539

Director and Professor, R. E. Smith; Professors, P. Hirzel, J. Kaytes, G. Kessler, T. Miyasaka; Associate Professors, J. Abell, J. Day, J. P. Gruen, R. Krikac, M. Melcher, A. Rahmani, J. Theodorson; Assistant Professors, O. Al-Hassawi, S. Call, M. Ghandi, K. Kraszewska, A. Pulay, K. Shrestha, T. Tafazzoli, V. Vahdat; Scholarly Associate Professors, S. Austin, R. Cherf, J. Peschel, C. Vielle; Scholarly Assistant Professors, D. Drake, M. Sánchez.

The School of Design and Construction (SDC) offers collaborative learning experiences for students in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, construction management, and construction engineering to design and construct places in our environment.  The integrated model teaches students the skill sets required for their chosen design major while giving students a substantial advantage when entering the job market.

Programs of study in the SDC lead to the following degrees: a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies (a four-year pre-professional degree) followed by a one-, two-, or three-year professional Master of Architecture degree that is accredited by the National Architectural Accreditation Board (NAAB); a Bachelor of Arts in Interior Design accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA) and a Master of Arts in Interior Design ; a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) ; and a Bachelor of Science in Construction Management (a four-year degree) that is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE), and a Bachelor of Science in Construction Engineering in conjunction with Civil Engineering.

It is crucial that students in the design and construction professions learn about a range of built environments, places, ideas, cultures, and experiences that are not readily available in the Palouse—and difficult to teach in the classroom. When possible, travel experiences are incorporated through courses labeled as “study tours” where travel is integral to the course, woven throughout other courses in the curriculum, and included as professional development activities.

Study abroad may be incorporated into the fourth year of study or during the summer. Foreign studies options include WSU sponsored programs, and programs offered by other institutions. Coordination is through the Office of International Programs—Global Learning. 

Students in the SDC also participate in a senior portfolio review and/or capstone project presentation prior to graduation. These experiences are unique networking opportunities for graduating students to interact with design and construction professionals, and to receive feedback on their existing portfolios or projects.

A variety of student clubs and organizations provide students with linkages to their professional counterparts.  Student organizations with chapters at the SDC include the American Institute of Architecture Students (AIAS); Alpha Rho Chi; American Society of Interior Designers (ASID); American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA); Associated Students of Construction Management (ASCM); Associated General Contractors of America (AGC); the Design Build Institute of America (DBIA); and Mechanical Contractors Association of America (MCAA).

 ARCHITECTURE

The four-year, pre-professional Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies degree at WSU provides a thorough foundation in the field of architecture as preparation for continued education in a professional degree program; employment in the architecture profession with a licensed architect; and employment options in fields related to architecture.

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) degree is the professional degree accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB). Completion of this degree allows students to take state exams and become licensed architects. Students must successfully complete a four-year undergraduate degree in architecture or a previous five-year Bachelor of Architecture degree to be eligible for the one- or two-year M.Arch. program. Students with baccalaureate degrees in disciplines other than architecture are eligible to apply for the three-year M.Arch. program. Please consult the WSU Graduate Catalog and/or http://sdc.wsu.edu/ for specific information regarding this degree, as well as admission requirements and course descriptions.

 Student Learning Outcomes

Students graduating in architecture are able to: 1) understand the role of architecture within current cultural and global conditions, 2) understand the role of architecture in the enhancement and preservation of natural resources, 3) understand the role of history and its transformations over time, 4) develop a desire and passion for life-long learning, and 5) develop intellectual and analytical skills that will be the foundation for future leaders. It is the intent of the program to graduate future professionals who are committed to excellence in the built environment through the incorporation of intellectual, analytical, and artful aspects of architecture. Within this context, students and faculty seek to investigate issues within diverse contexts in order to creatively advance the built environment.

 Transfer Students

Students planning to transfer into the architecture program at Washington State University should contact an advisor for more information.

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

The management of construction projects has become more complex due to the shortage of resources, specialized materials, sophisticated delivery methods and the financial and legal responsibilities encountered during the project life cycle. From construction management to project management and program management, the needs of the industry and the built environment are expanding at an unprecedented rate. At the heart of the building process is the construction professional.

The WSU Construction Management (CM) program provides students with the tools and skills necessary to develop strong administrative, leadership and management expertise to be successful in today’s construction industry. Students pursuing a degree in construction management will be expected to understand a wide variety of topics that make up the built environment. This expertise includes understanding properties of materials and construction systems required for the construction professional. Concepts regarding contract administration, sustainability, risk management, estimating and scheduling are critical skills.

Students in this program are encouraged to develop an inquisitive and inventive mind to understand management techniques, methods, and sequencing. It is also important that the graduate in construction management be knowledgeable in the field of business. Courses offered in a variety of departments are required to assure this breadth of understanding. The Bachelor of Science in Construction Management degree program is accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE).

Student Learning Outcomes

The mission of WSU-CM is to educate, prepare and provide opportunities for students to become valuable resources to our economy, the construction management profession, and the built environment. ACCE requirements establish twenty (20) pre-defined student learning outcomes that are comprehensive in nature.  These measurable outcomes are introduced, reinforced, and assessed throughout the CM curriculum in an effort to ensure students are entering the construction industry with appropriate foundational knowledge and requisite skills to be work ready, day one.  Upon graduating from an accredited ACCE bachelor’s degree program, a graduate shall be able to:

  1. Create written communications appropriate to the construction discipline.
  2. Create oral presentations appropriate to the construction discipline.
  3. Create a construction project safety plan.
  4. Create construction project cost estimates.
  5. Create construction project schedules.
  6. Analyze professional decisions based on ethical principles.
  7. Analyze construction documents for planning and management of construction processes.
  8. Analyze methods, materials, and equipment used to construct projects.
  9. Apply construction management skills as a member of a multidisciplinary team.
  10. Apply electronic-based technology to manage the construction process.
  11. Apply basic surveying techniques for construction layout and control.
  12. Understand different methods of project delivery and the roles and responsibilities of all constituencies involved in the design and construction process.
  13. Understand construction risk management.
  14. Understand construction accounting and cost control.
  15. Understand construction quality assurance and control.
  16. Understand construction project control processes.
  17. Understand the legal implications of contract, common, and regulatory law to manage a construction project.
  18. Understand the basic principles of sustainable construction.
  19. Understand the basic principles of structural behavior.
  20. Understand the basic principles of mechanical, electrical and piping systems.

 Transfer Students

Students planning to transfer into the construction management program at Washington State University should contact an advisor for more information.

INTERIOR DESIGN

Accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA), the Bachelor of Arts in Interior Design is a professional degree program that provides the common body of knowledge related to interior design as recognized by CIDA. The interior design program is based on a concern for human beings and the creation of interior settings that support human activities and values. The curriculum is structured to create unique learning experiences each semester. Studios focus on a multitude of design theories rooted in a variety of relevant disciplines. Lecture course content is integrated into the studio experience to reinforce specified skills and knowledge. With increasing challenge and complexity, multidisciplinary exposure and experiences continue throughout the curriculum to inform design solutions as well as prepare students to work with a myriad of professionals upon graduation.

Professional/Global Experience

The WSU Interior Design program values experiential learning as an important component of a student’s education. In addition to travel experiences throughout the curriculum, all fourth-year students must present their portfolio of creative work at an off-campus review to graduate.

In the fall semester of the fourth year, students will participate in a professional and/or global experience, choosing one of the following options:

  • Option 1: Internship—students can choose to complete a 5-credit internship and are encouraged to seek opportunities beyond the region.
  • Option 2: Study Abroad—students can choose to participate in the department’s study abroad program providing them an opportunity to experience design within the context of another culture.
  • Option 3: Community Studio—students can work with faculty on community-based projects.

Student Learning Outcomes

A graduate of the interior design program is a creative thinker and problem solver. An education in interior design develops intellectual curiosity, which supports continued professional development throughout life. Students develop skills that allow them to analyze information, evaluate issues, and set priorities while generating creative design solutions for projects of a complex scale. As graduates of WSU’s Interior Design program, students can take the initiative, make critical judgments of their own designs, as well as others, and operate within a team context; all of which contributes to their future success as professionals.

Transfer Students

Students wishing to transfer from another institution into the interior design program should contact an advisor for more information.

Graduate Studies

The Master of Arts in Interior Design (MA) program increases students’ understanding of the relationship between human behavior and interior environments through advanced study and hands-on research. Students gain knowledge and skills that prepare them to analyze information and relationships, evaluate issues, and set priorities, while creating functional and high-quality design solutions for complex projects. The degree is offered in three tracks depending on prior academic and professional background. Please consult the WSU Graduate catalog and/or http://sdc.wsu.edu for specific information regarding this degree, as well as admission requirements and course descriptions.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Landscape architecture involves designing and implementing opportunities for people to engage with their environment. It is an interdisciplinary field dedicated to crafting meaningful places across diverse scales and contexts.

The Bachelor of Landscape Architecture (BLA) is a professional degree program that prepares students to enter and advance the diverse profession of landscape architecture, address complex societal issues, and envision solutions that optimize the physical environments where people work, live, and recreate.

The BLA curriculum is structured to create unique learning experiences each semester.  Broadly speaking, the curriculum emphasizes practical and applied experiential learning, draws from courses across campus, and provides students with opportunities to think critically and integrate diverse bodies of knowledge. The professional course of study is divided into two segments:  pre-landscape architecture and the second – fourth year professional landscape architecture program (BLA). Completion of the program leads to the degree of Bachelor of Landscape Architecture and allows the graduate to enter the profession. At least three additional years of professional experience and successful completion of the landscape architectural license examination (LARE) are necessary for registration as a licensed landscape architect in most states.

The core component of the landscape architecture curriculum is the studio experience. The studios are structured to facilitate understanding of the web of relationships among physical, biological, and social systems. Through the studio curriculum students learn habits of linking ecological processes with space making and necessarily consider interdependence, reciprocity, and change.

First year projects focus on the basic elements and principles of design and design process. The second year emphasizes the concept of site and the methods for and consequences of manipulating the ground and vegetation. Coursework includes site design, site engineering, plant materials, and design history. The third year reinforces and extends students' understanding of the field of landscape architecture and emphasizes integration of theory, practice, and construction. Studios focus on design for communities in the broadest sense. In the fourth year, coursework emphasizes design in the context of landscape complexity, systems thinking, and the overlap of global and local issues. Students develop and execute independent projects. In the projects they are encouraged to think of design as an answer to a question and regard their work as an opportunity to develop, test, and challenge what they have learned in the first three years of their design education. Computer visualization and freehand drawing skills are threaded throughout the curriculum.

In addition to travel experiences throughout the curriculum, all fourth-year students must present their capstone project and a portfolio of creative work at an off-campus review to graduate.

Student Learning Outcomes

The program has identified four themes that include 12 critical student learning outcomes (SLO) essential for students to achieve the LA program goals. The outcomes are multifaceted and interrelated.

Theme One: Define and refine design problems and questions

Upon successful completion of the BLA at WSU, students will be able to

1. Identify and characterize the complex nature of problems and questions associated with human/ landscape interactions across a broad range of scales

2. Articulate an understanding of identified problems and questions within the theoretical and historical context of the profession of landscape architecture

Theme Two: Discover and determine appropriate design processes

Upon successful completion of the BLA at WSU, students will be able to

3. Identify appropriate methods of design inquiry and problem solving processes to produce creative solutions to identified problems and questions

4. Identify, collect, and analyze necessary information using appropriate technologies and analytical techniques as they relate to the identified problem or question.

5. Explore and critically analyze alternative design or planning solutions to the identified problem or question

6. Engage in assessment and evaluation practices throughout the entire design process

Theme Three: Explore and develop communication skills

Upon successful completion of the BLA at WSU, students will be able to

7. Justify and defend the proposed design or planning solution within the context of aesthetic, social, political, economic, and environmental conditions.

8. Communicate the entire problem solving process or method of inquiry in written, oral, and graphic ways using appropriate media

Theme Four: Cultivate awareness of professional practices 

Upon successful completion of the BLA at WSU, students will be able to

9. Understand multiple aspects of practice

10. Show a capacity for collaboration 

11. Integrate and apply diverse perspectives to design solutions

12. Possess knowledge and understanding about allied fields and the value of interdisciplinary design

Transfer Students

Transfer students who have completed the equivalent of the pre-LA curriculum may apply to the professional program by submitting a portfolio and academic transcripts. Contact the landscape architecture program for more information.




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies (120 Credits)

Architectural Studies (ARCH) is a four-year program structured into one year of pre-professional coursework and three years of major (professional) coursework. Professional program courses begin in second year fall. Due to the sequential nature of courses there are no spring admits.

To be considered for admission into the ARCH program, a student must have completed the following pre-professional coursework (or their approved equivalents): COM 102 [COMM], ENGLISH 101 [WRTG], FINE ART 101, 201, or 202 [ARTS], HIST 105 [ROOT], PSYCH 105 or SOC 101 [SSCI], and SDC 100, 120, 140, each with a grade of C or better and an overall GPA of 3.3 or higher.

Students not meeting the admission to major criteria above will be considered until enrollment limits are reached. Average enrollment limit into the second year of the architecture major are 45 students. Greater emphasis is given to performance in SDC 100, 120, and 140. Completion of all pre-professional coursework does not guarantee acceptance into the professional program. Students are encouraged to work with SDC advisors to identify an alternate major should they not be admitted to their primary choice of major.

Transfer Students
A limited number of transfer students are considered each year. Requirements include completion of the pre-professional courses (or approved equivalents). Emphasis is given to cumulative GPA. A design portfolio may be requested for additional evaluation.

Schedule of Studies
The plan below is a suggested path to completion of the architectural studies degree. Students will meet with an advisor each semester to confirm academic schedule and monitor progress towards graduation.

Students are required to earn a grade of C or better in all major courses required for the degree (ARCH 201, 203, 209, 210, 215, 301, 303, 309, 351, 352, 401, 403, 451; CST M 201, 202, 332, 333; SDC 100, 120, 140, 250, 300, 350).
First Year
First TermCredits
COM 102 [COMM]3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]1,23
SDC 100 [ARTS]3
SDC 1203
Second TermCredits
FINE ART 101, 201, or 202 3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
PHYSICS 101 [PSCI] 23
PHYSICS 111 [PSCI]1
PSYCH 105 [SSCI] or SOC 101[SSCI]3
SDC 1403
Second Year
First TermCredits
ARCH 2015
ARCH 2103
CST M 2013
SDC 2503
SDC 3001
Second TermCredits
ARCH 2035
ARCH 2093
ARCH 215 3
CST M 2023
SDC 350 [M]3
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
ARCH 3015
ARCH 309 [M]3
ARCH 3513
ARCH 451 3
CST M 3323
Second TermCredits
ARCH 3035
ARCH 3523
Biological Sciences [BSCI] 4
CST M 3333
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ARCH 4016
Diversity [DIVR]3
Supportive Electives34
Second TermCredits
ARCH 403 [CAPS]6
Humanities [HUM]3
Supportive Electives33

Footnotes
1All first-year students must take the math placement exam. Completion of MATH 108 with a grade of C or better, a minimum ALEKS math placement score of 75%, or passing MATH 140, 171, or 202 is required for PHYSICS 101 [PSCI]. MATH 108 does not fulfill the University [QUAN] requirement for graduation.
2Math and Physics are not required for admission to the major (professional program, beginning in second year); however, Math and Physics are course prerequisites for ARCH 351/352 and CST M 332/333 in the third year.
3Supportive Electives: At least 7 credits of any 300-400-level courses from ARCH, CST M, DESIGN, I D, LND ARCH, SDC, or other courses approved in consultation with ARCH Program Head not used to fulfill major requirements.

Construction Management Program (120 Credits)

Construction Management (CM) is a four-year program structured into one year of pre-professional coursework and three years of major (professional) coursework. Professional program courses begin in second year fall. Due to the sequential nature of courses there are no spring admits.

To be considered for admission into the CM program, a student must have completed at least 31 semester hours of pre-professional coursework including the following courses (or their approved equivalents): CST M 102, Communication [COMM], ECONS 101 and 102 [SSCI], ENGLISH 101 [WRTG], SOE 101 [PSCI], HISTORY 105 [ROOT], Humanities [HUM] or Diversity [DIVR], MATH 171 [QUAN], and SDC 100 [ARTS], each with a grade of C or better and an overall GPA of 3.3 or higher.

Students not meeting the admission to major criteria above will be considered until enrollment limits are reached. Average enrollment limit into the second year of the construction management major is 50 students. Completion of all pre-professional coursework does not guarantee acceptance into the professional program. Students are encouraged to work with SDC advisors to identify an alternate major should they not be admitted to their primary choice of major.

Transfer Students
A limited number of transfer students are considered each year. Requirements include completion of the pre-professional courses (or approved equivalents). Emphasis is given to cumulative GPA.

Schedule of Studies
The plan below is a suggested path to completion of the construction management degree. Students will meet with an advisor each semester to confirm academic schedule and monitor progress towards
graduation.

Students are required to earn a grade of C or better in all major courses required for the degree (CST M 102, 201, 202, 222, 252, 254, 332, 333, 356, 362, 368, 370, 371, 451, 460, 462, 473, 475, 483; ARCH 351, 352, 463)
First Year
First TermCredits
Pre-Professional Program (1st Year)
Communication [COMM] 3
ECONS 101 [SSCI]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
SDC 100 [ARTS]3
SOE 101 [PSCI]4
Second TermCredits
CST M 10212
Diversity [DIVR] or Humanities [HUM]23
ECONS 1023
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
Second Year
First TermCredits
Professional Program (2nd - 4th Years)
ARCH 3513
CST M 2222
CST M 2013
CST M 2542
PHYSICS 101 OR 2013
PHYSICS 111 OR 2111
Second TermCredits
ACCTG 2303
ARCH 3523
B LAW 2103
CST M 2023
CST M 2524
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
C E 3022
CST M 3323
CST M 362 [M]3
CST M 3703
CST M 4513
Second TermCredits
CST M 3333
CST M 3563
CST M 3683
CST M 3713
CST M 4833
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
ARCH 4633
CST M 4603
CST M 4623
MGMT 3013
300-400-level CST M Elective3
Second TermCredits
Biological Sciences [BSCI]3
CST M 4733
CST M 475 [CAPS] [M]3
Diversity [DIVR] or Humanities [HUM]23
300-400-level Business Elective33
Complete Senior Exit Survey

Footnotes
1Transfer students from community colleges or institutions outside WSU may test out of CST M 102 via an application from the School of Design and Construction.
2University Requirements include 3 credits of [HUM] and 3 credits of [DIVR].
3Business Elective: Any 300-400-level ACCTG, B LAW, ECONS, ENTRP, FIN, HBM, I BUS, MGMT, MGTOP, MIS, or MKTG course. Another course may be approved in consultation with Construction Management Program Head.

Interior Design (120 Credits)

Interior Design (ID) is a four-year program structured into one year of pre-professional coursework and three years of major (professional) coursework. Professional program courses begin in second year fall. Due to the sequential nature of courses there are no spring admits. To be considered for admission into the ID program, a student must have completed the following pre-professional coursework (or their approved equivalents):

COM 102 [COMM], ENGLISH 101 [WRTG], FINE ART 101, 201, or 202 [ARTS], HISTORY 105 [ROOT], PSYCH 105 or SOC 101 [SSCI], and SDC 100, 120, 140, each with a grade of C or better and an overall GPA of 3.3 or higher.

Students not meeting the admission to major criteria above will be considered until enrollment limits are reached. Average enrollment limits into the second year of the interior design major are 25-30 students. Greater emphasis is given to performance in SDC 100, 120, and 140. Completion of all pre-professional coursework does not guarantee acceptance into the professional program. Students are encouraged to work with SDC advisors to identify an alternate major should they not be admitted to their primary choice of major.

Transfer Students
A limited number of transfer students are considered each year. Requirements include completion of the pre-professional courses (or approved equivalents). Emphasis is given to cumulative GPA. A design portfolio may be requested for additional evaluation.

Schedule of Studies
The plan below is a suggested path to completion of the interior design degree. Students will meet with an advisor each semester to confirm academic schedule and monitor progress towards graduation.

Students are required to earn a grade of C or better in all major courses required for the degree (SDC 100, 120, 140, 250, 300, 350, 473; I D 197, 201, 203, 205, 215, 277, 297, 312, 321, 325, 326, 333, 350, 397, 415, 425, 426, 460).
First Year
First TermCredits
COM 102 [COMM]3
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
SDC 100 [ARTS]3
SDC 1203
SOC 101 [SSCI] or PSYCH 105 [SSCI]3
Second TermCredits
Biological [BSCI] 13 or 4
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
FINE ART 101, 201, or 202 3
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN] 23
SDC 1403
Second Year
First TermCredits
I D 1973
I D 2014
I D 2053
I D 2771
SDC 2503
SDC 30031
Second TermCredits
Diversity [DIVR]3
I D 2034
I D 2153
I D 2973
SDC 350 [M]3
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
I D 3122
I D 3214
I D 3253
I D 3263
I D 3973
Second TermCredits
I D 3334
I D 3503
I D 4153
I D 4603
Supportive Electives44 or 3
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
Humanities [HUM]3
I D 425 or 4905
Supportive Electives 47
Second TermCredits
I D 426 [CAPS]5
Physical Science [PSCI] 14 or 3
SDC 473 [M]3
Portfolio Review5
Complete Senior Exit Survey

Footnotes
1For a total of 7 credits—one Biological Sciences [BSCI] and one Physical Sciences [PSCI] course, including one lab course.
2All first-year students must take the ALEKS math placement exam. Prerequisites may be required depending on the score.
3Students must complete SDC 300 by the end of the second year.
4Supportive Electives: At least 10 credits of any 300-400-level courses from ARCH, CST M, I D, DESIGN, LND ARCH, SDC, or other courses approved in consultation with I D Program Head not used to fulfill major requirements. Italian Language course is considered a supportive elective for students who study abroad. Total credits must meet the University requirement of 120 credits of coursework.
5Portfolio Review required in the final semester of program.

Landscape Architecture (120 Credits)

Landscape Architecture (LA) is a four-year program structured into one year of pre-professional coursework and three years of major (professional) coursework. Professional program courses begin in second year fall. Due to the sequential nature of courses there are no spring admits.

To be considered for admission into the LA program, a student must have completed the following pre-professional coursework (or their approved equivalents): COM 102 [COMM], ENGLISH 101[WRTG], FINE ARTS 101, 201, or 202 [ARTS], HIST 105 [ROOT], PSYCH 105 or SOC 101 [SSCI], and SDC 100, 120, 140, each with a grade of C or better and a cumulative GPA of 3.3 or higher.

Students not meeting the admission to major criteria above will be considered until enrollment limits are reached. Average enrollment limits into the second year of the landscape architecture major are 25-30 students. Greater emphasis is given to performance in SDC 100, 120, and 140. Completion of all pre-professional coursework does not guarantee acceptance into the professional program. Students are encouraged to work with SDC advisors to identify an alternate major should they not be admitted to their primary choice of major.

Transfer Students
A limited number of transfer students are considered each year. Requirements include completion of the pre-professional courses (or approved equivalents). Emphasis is given to cumulative GPA. A design portfolio may be requested for additional evaluation.

Schedule of Studies
The plan below is a suggested path to completion of the landscape architecture degree. Students will meet with an advisor each semester to confirm academic schedule and monitor progress towards graduation.

Students are required to earn a grade of C or better in all major courses required for the degree (HORT 330, 331; LND ARCH 222, 262, 263, 297, 327, 362, 363, 365, 366, 367, 380, 450, 470, 485; SOIL SCI 201; SDC 100, 120, 140, 250, 300, 350, 473).
First Year
First TermCredits
BIOLOGY 120 [BSCI]14
HISTORY 105 [ROOT]3
PSYCH 105 [SSCI] or SOC 101 [SSCI]3
SDC 100 [ARTS]3
SDC 1203
Second TermCredits
COM 102 [COMM]3
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
FINE ART 101, 201, or 202 3
SDC 1403
SOE 101 [PSCI]4
Second Year
First TermCredits
Digital Tools Requirement I23
LND ARCH 2221
LND ARCH 2624
Quantitative Reasoning [QUAN]33
SDC 2503
SDC 30041
Second TermCredits
LND ARCH 2634
LND ARCH 2973
LND ARCH 3654
SDC 350 [M]3
SOIL SCI 2013
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
Digital Tools Requirement II53
HORT 3303
LND ARCH 3273
LND ARCH 3624
LND ARCH 3664
Second TermCredits
HORT 3313
LND ARCH 3634
LND ARCH 3673
LND ARCH 38063
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
Diversity [DIVR]3
Humanities [HUM]3
LND ARCH 4704
Supportive Electives73
Second TermCredits
LND ARCH 450 [M]3
LND ARCH 485 [CAPS] [M]4
SDC 473 [M]3
Supportive Electives73
Complete Digital Portfolio

Footnotes
1Students are encouraged to complete BIOLOGY 120 [BSCI] and SOE 101 [PSCI] during the first year; however, these are not a requirement for admission to the professional program. If BIOLOGY 120 is not taken in Fall, BIOLOGY 106 can be substituted in the Spring.
2Digital Tools Requirement I (3 credits): Select from I D 197, LND ARCH 210, or approved alternative.
3All first-year students must take the ALEKS math placement exam. Prerequisites may be required depending on the score.
4Students must complete SDC 300 by the end of the second year.
5Digital Tools Requirement II (3 credits): Select from I D 397, LND ARCH 467, SOIL SCI 368, or approved alternative.
6If LND ARCH 380 is not available, may use BIOLOGY 372, 462, SOE 300, 454, or 464.
7Supportive electives: At least 6 credits of 300-400-level courses from ARCH, CST M, DESIGN, I D, LND ARCH, SDC, or other courses approved in consultation with LA Program Head not used to fulfill major requirements.


Minors

Architectural Studies

The minor in architectural studies requires a minimum of 18 credits of which at least 9 must be upper-division and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses. To be eligible to apply for the minor a student must have completed SDC 120 and have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00. Additional requirements include: ARCH 309, SDC 140, 250, 350; and 3 credits of 300-400-level ARCH coursework.


Construction Management

The minor in construction management requires a minimum of 17 credits, 9 of which must be upper-division and taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.  To be eligible to apply for the minor a student must be admitted to a major and have a minimum GPA of 2.70. The minor is limited to 10 students per year. The required courses are CST M 102, 252, 370, 462, 3 credits of business electives, and 3 credits of construction emphasis electives. Approved business electives include ECONS 327, WGSS 315, or any 300-400-level ACCTG, B LAW, ENTRP, FIN, HBM, I BUS, MGMT, MGTOP, MIS, or MKTG course. Approved construction emphasis electives include any 300-400-level CST M course.



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Architecture (ARCH)

(Select Campus to see schedule links)


201 Architectural Design I 5 (0-10) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies. Introduction to architectural design focusing on composition, conceptual design and principles of organization, scale, proportion, rhythm and 3-D development. Typically offered Fall.

203 Architectural Design II 5 (0-10) Course Prerequisite: ARCH 201 with a C or better. Introduction to architectural design focusing on the art and aesthetics of structural expression and principles of structure as an ordering system. Typically offered Spring.

209 Design Theory I 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies. Design theory relating to building technology, systems and crafts which influence design decisions. Typically offered Spring.

210 Digital Analysis and Representation 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Landscape Architecture. Introduction to analysis and representation with a focus on the use of digital tools. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 210, LND ARCH 210). Typically offered Fall.

215 Issues in Sustainable Architecture 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies. Introduction to the framework, challenges, and solutions of sustainable design in the built environment. Typically offered Spring.

220 Architectural History I 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or majors pursuing non-Architecture degrees. Historic development of world architecture from prehistory to late medieval; social, technical and scientific influences.

301 Architectural Design III 5 (0-10) Course Prerequisite: ARCH 203 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies. Introduction of architectural design focusing on environmental and social issues. Travel for site visit required. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

303 Architectural Design IV 5 (0-10) Course Prerequisite: ARCH 301 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies. Continuation of study of architectural design/form as influenced by cultural, spiritual and symbolic issues. Travel for site visit required. Typically offered Spring.

309 [M] Modern Architecture and Theory 3 Course Prerequisite: SDC 250 with a C or better; SDC 350 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies. Built and theoretical developments in architecture from the nineteenth century to present; content may be linked to study tour with associated travel required. Typically offered Fall.

351 Architectural Structures I 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 108 with a C or better, or 140, 171, 202, or 206, or a minimum ALEKS math placement score 75%; admitted major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Introduction to statics and mechanics; analysis and design of statically determinate architectural structures using timber, steel, and reinforced concrete systems. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

352 Architectural Structures II 3 Course Prerequisite: ARCH 351 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Continuation of ARCH 351. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

401 Architectural Design V 6 (0-12) Course Prerequisite: ARCH 303 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies. Advanced architectural design focusing on technology, systems and crafts of buildings. Travel for site visit required. Typically offered Fall.

403 [CAPS] Comprehensive Design Studio I 6 (0-12) Course Prerequisite: ARCH 401 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies; senior standing. Integrated capstone studio focusing on design and construction documents, costs, and specifications. Travel to site may be required. Typically offered Spring.

409 [M] Design Theory VI 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies. Advanced design theory relating to social and environmental issues which influence housing design for the urban environment. Typically offered Fall.

428 Architecture and Culture in the Islamic World 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major or minor in Architectural Studies; junior standing. A thematic course exploring the relationship between architecture and culture in the context of Islamic civilization. Typically offered Fall.

436 Contemporary Furniture Design 3 (1-4) Course Prerequisite: Admitted major in Architectural Studies, Construction Management, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Investigation of issues related to the design and fabrication of furniture; students design and fabricate projects in the school shop. Typically offered Fall.

440 Architectural Acoustics for Construction Management 2 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Introduction to the art and science of architectural acoustics with emphasis on understanding construction performance specifications. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 440, CST M 440). Typically offered Fall and Spring.

446 Computer Animation I 3 (1-4) Course Prerequisite: Admitted major in Architectural Studies, Construction Management, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Introduction to computer animation production and building simulation; applicable for all majors.

451 Computer-aided Design I 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies. Computer-aided design related to 3D modeling and construction documents. Typically offered Fall.

452 Computer-aided Design II 2 (1-2) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Continuation of ARCH 451. Computer-aided design related to 3D modeling and construction documents. Typically offered Spring.

456 Field Sketching/Journal Keeping 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies, Construction Management, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Field-sketching/journal-keeping strategies to facilitate investigation and comprehension of the built environment. Typically offered Summer Session.

463 Architectural Structures III 3 Course Prerequisite: ARCH 352 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Wind and seismic loads on architectural structures; high-rise systems; reinforced concrete and masonry structures. Credit not granted for both ARCH 463 and ARCH 563. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

464 Architectural Structures IV 3 Course Prerequisite: ARCH 463 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Deflection theory; classical and computer analysis for statically indeterminate architectural structure systems. Credit not granted for both ARCH 464 and ARCH 564. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

472 Codes and Acoustics 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted major in Architectural Studies, Construction Management, or Interior Design. Building codes and specifications; sound theory, control, and acoustic systems applied to buildings. Typically offered Fall.

480 Architecture Internship V 1-16 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 16 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Placement in an approved industrial, professional, or governmental situation for specialized or general experience. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

490 Seminar in Architectural Design V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: ARCH 203 with a C or better, I D 203 with a C or better, LND ARCH 263 with a C or better, or graduate student. Advanced study in architectural design. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

491 Seminar in Architectural Communications V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: ARCH 203 with a C or better, I D 203 with a C or better, LND ARCH 263 with a C or better, or graduate student. Advanced study in graphic communication. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

492 Seminar in Architectural History V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: ARCH 203 with a C or better, I D 203 with a C or better, LND ARCH 263 with a C or better, or graduate student. Advanced study in architectural history. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

493 Seminar in Environmental Control V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: ARCH 203 with a C or better, I D 203 with a C or better, LND ARCH 263 with a C or better, or graduate student. Advanced study in environmental control of buildings. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

494 Seminar in Urban and Regional Planning V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: ARCH 203 with a C or better, I D 203 with a C or better, LND ARCH 263 with a C or better, or graduate student. Advanced study in urban and regional planning. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

495 Seminar in Construction Management V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted major in Architectural Studies, Construction Management, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Advanced study in construction practice management. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

496 Seminar in Computer Applications V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: ARCH 203 with a C or better, I D 203 with a C or better, LND ARCH 263 with a C or better, or graduate student. Architectural and construction applications of computer graphics, management, computer-aided design. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

510 Graduate Design Studio III 6 (0-12) Intensive summer studio focusing on design projects that address significant issues in a particular context and locale (regional, national, or international city) outside of Pullman. Typically offered Summer Session.

510 (Effective through Spring 2022) Summer Graduate Design Studio 6 (0-12) Intensive summer studio focusing on design projects that address prevailing issues in a particular context and locale (regional, national, or international city) outside of Pullman. Typically offered Summer Session.

511 Graduate Design Studio IV 6 (0-12) Graduate studio experience researching a single topic of material relevance to architecture. Travel for site visit required. Typically offered Fall.

511 (Effective through Summer 2022) Graduate Design Studio I 6 (0-12) Graduate studio experience researching a single topic of architectural relevance. Travel for site visit required. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

513 Graduate Design Studio V 6 (0-12) Course Prerequisite: ARCH 511 with a C or better. Graduate studio experience researching a single topic of material relevance to architecture. Travel for site visit required. Typically offered Spring.

513 (Effective through Summer 2022) Graduate Design Studio II 6 (0-12) Course Prerequisite: ARCH 511 with a C or better. Graduate studio experience researching a single topic of architectural relevance. Travel for site visit required. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

515 Research Methods and Programming 3 Exploration of traditional research methods and investigations for architects. Typically offered Fall.

520 Directed Topics in Architecture V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Topics related to areas of emphasis in the program and student specialization. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

525 History and Theory 3 History and theory of 20th century architecture focusing on cultural and philosophical principles related to design. Typically offered Fall.

527 Site and Landscape Design 3 Exploration of issues of site context analysis, topography, planning, and landscape design. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

530 Philosophies and Theories of the Built Environment 3 Course Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Architecture, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Focus on systematic thought which may describe behavior of the built environment. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 530, I D 530, LND ARCH 530). Typically offered Fall.

531 Advanced Tectonics 3 Tectonic theory of concrete and metal construction with focus on skin design and technology as formative elements in architecture. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

540 Research Methods 3 Research methods, from quantitative to technical to philosophical, directed toward qualitative research. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 540, I D 540, LND ARCH 540). Typically offered Spring.

542 Issues in Architecture 3 Examination of issues in architecture related to society, culture, environment, politics, and philosophy. Typically offered Fall.

560 Interdisciplinary Seminar 3 Explores approaches to design thinking in the topic areas of people and place, history, theory and criticism, and physical design. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 560, I D 560, LND ARCH 560).

563 Architectural Structures III 3 Wind and seismic loads on architectural structures; high-rise systems; reinforced concrete and masonry structures. Credit not granted for both ARCH 463 and ARCH 563. Offered at 400 and 500 level. Typically offered Fall.

564 Architectural Structures IV 3 Course Prerequisite: ARCH 463 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Deflection theory; classical and computer analysis for statically indeterminate architectural structure systems. Credit not granted for both ARCH 464 and ARCH 564. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

570 Advanced Architectural Design Studio I 6 (0-12) Advanced study of design problems relating to culture, environment, technology, urban planning, or other topics. Travel for site visit required. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

571 Advanced Architectural Design Studio II 6 (0-12) Course Prerequisite: ARCH 570. Advanced study of design problems relating to culture, environment, technology, urban planning, or other topics. Travel for site visit required. Typically offered Spring.

573 Ethics and Practice 3 Ethical and professional practice issues related to the business and practice of architecture; investigations into marketing client and business orientation. Typically offered Spring.

577 Theories and Methods of Urban Construction 3 Morphology, theoretical concepts, planning and spatial structure of cities and analysis of the transformation of the city core in Europe and America. Typically offered Fall.

580 Architecture Practicum V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Graduate student in M Architecture degree program. Internship, travel study, or independent study related to the field of architecture. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Spring and Summer. S, U grading.

701 Master's Independent Capstone Project and /or Examination V 1-6 May be repeated for credit. Capstone project or final examination for professional master's degree under the Graduate School. The credits will include a balloted evaluation of the student's completion of the program's capstone/examination requirements by the program's graduate faculty. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and obtain approval from their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 701 credit. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-6 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


Construction Management (CST_M)

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102 Introduction to the Built Environment 2 Introduction to the construction industry; reviewing contract documents, methods of project management and current issues pertaining to the industry. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

201 Materials I 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management or Architectural Studies. Introduction to construction materials; primary materials used in below-grade substructures and above-grade superstructures using Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format. Typically offered Fall.

202 Materials II 3 Course Prerequisite: CST M 201 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management or Architectural Studies. Introduction to primary materials in construction of building envelopes, interiors, interior surfaces and finishes using Construction Specification Institute (CSI) format. Typically offered Spring.

222 Culture of Construction Management 2 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management. Introduction to the CM culture with focus on preparation for internships, student competitions, engagement opportunities, and success as a student within the program. Typically offered Fall.

252 Construction Administration and Documentation 4 (3-2) Course Prerequisite: CST M 102 with a C or better; CST M 201 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management. Study and understanding of administrative procedures found within construction projects and respective documentation. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

254 Construction Graphics 2 (1-2) Course Prerequisite: CST M 102 with a C or better or ENGR 120 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management, Construction Engineering, or Civil Engineering. Visual literacy and details in construction documents using drawing techniques. Typically offered Fall.

254 (Effective through Summer 2021) Construction Graphics 2 (1-2) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management, Construction Engineering, or Civil Engineering. Visual literacy and details in construction documents using drawing techniques. Typically offered Fall.

301 Management and Organization 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management. Principles of management, administration, and organization with an emphasis on their relationship to the construction management profession.

332 Building Science I 3 Course Prerequisite: 4 credits of PHYSICS 101 with a C or better, or PHYSICS 101 and 111 with a C or better; admitted major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Mechanical systems for buildings; building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems, heat flow concepts. Typically offered Fall.

332 (Effective through Summer 2021) Building Science I 3 Course Prerequisite: PHYSICS 101 with a C or better; admitted major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Mechanical systems for buildings; building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems, heat flow concepts. Typically offered Fall.

333 Building Science II 3 Course Prerequisite: CST M 332 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Water supply, drainage, electrical and lighting systems for buildings. Typically offered Spring.

356 Earthwork and Equipment 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management, Construction Engineering, or Civil Engineering. Methods and procedures for site work, excavation, dewatering, building foundation and equipment, productivity, finance and safety requirements. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

362 [M] Legal Aspects of Construction and Design 3 Course Prerequisite: CST M 252 with a C or better; B LAW 210 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management. Statutory and common law governing the practice of design and construction in the US; emphasis in architecture and construction project contract administration. Typically offered Spring.

368 Safety and Health 3 Course Prerequisite: CST M 356 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management or Construction Engineering; junior standing. Role and function of safety and health in the construction industry including OSHA compliance, requirements and regulations. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

368 (Effective through Summer 2021) Safety and Health 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management or Construction Engineering; junior standing. Role and function of safety and health in the construction industry including OSHA compliance, requirements and regulations. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

370 Estimating I 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: CST M 252 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management. Admitted civil engineering majors may take by permission. Applications of quantity survey, techniques in creation of unit costs, introduction of job expenses and bid presentation. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

371 Estimating II 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: CST M 370 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management. Bidding application, advance concepts in the creation of unit cost and computer software applications. Typically offered Spring.

440 Architectural Acoustics for Construction Management 2 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management. Introduction to the art and science of architectural acoustics with emphasis on understanding construction performance specifications. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 440, CST M 440). Typically offered Fall and Spring.

451 Delivery Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: CST M 252; admitted to the major in Construction Management, or junior standing in Architectural Studies, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, or Civil Engineering. Design/construction process and project delivery systems/approaches; analysis of construction management; the construction management process. Typically offered Fall.

458 Methods and Procedures of Heavy Construction 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management; junior standing. Methods and procedures for site work, heavy equipment, cranes, productivity; finance and safety requirements.

460 Construction Cost Accounting 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: CON E 361 with a C or better or CST M 371 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management or Construction Engineering. Examination of cost accounting utilized for specific project control as well as overall company control. Typically offered Fall.

462 Planning and Scheduling 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: CE 317 with a C or better, CON E 361 with a C or better, or CST M 371 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management, Civil Engineering, or Construction Engineering. Methods, principles, and concepts required to plan and schedule construction projects; introduction to scheduling software. Typically offered Fall and Summer.

466 Heavy/Civil Estimating 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management, or junior standing and admitted to the major in Civil Engineering. Estimating in quantity survey, price extension and bidding in civil projects. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

467 Ethics and Construction Management 3 Course Prerequisite: CST M 252 with a C or better; CST M 370 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management; senior standing. Ethics and morality relating to the construction profession including common decisions. Typically offered Spring.

469 Residential Green Building 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management; senior standing. Residential construction segments; sustainable products and practices applicable to residential construction. Typically offered Fall.

473 Human Productivity in Construction 3 Course Prerequisite: CST M 460 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management or Construction Engineering. Leadership and management concepts and methods applied to human behavior to enhance motivation, productivity and safety in construction. Typically offered Spring.

473 (Effective through Summer 2021) Human Productivity in Construction 3 Course Prerequisite: CST M 460 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management or Construction Engineering. Leadership and management concepts and methods applied to human behavior to enhance motivation, productivity and safety in construction. Typically offered Spring.

475 [CAPS] [M] Senior Capstone 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: CST M 451 with a C or better; CST M 462 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Construction Management. Simulation of real world competition for Design-Build and/or CM at Risk (CM/GC) projects. Typically offered Spring.

482 Conceptual Estimating for Architects 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Construction Management; junior standing. Quantity survey, price extension and bidding as applied to architecture; concepts of pricing, value engineering, and ethics.

483 Building Information Modeling I 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies, Construction Management, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Use of Building Information Modeling (BIM) for construction coordination via emerging technologies and/or BIM software to collaborate with multiple distributed stakeholders and students from other disciplines. Typically offered Spring.

484 Temporary Structures 3 Course Prerequisite: ARCH 352 with a C or better or CE 330 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Civil Engineering, Construction Engineering, Construction Management, or Architectural Studies. Temporary structures including formwork, falsework, soldier pile and lagging, sheet pile, cofferdam, scaffolding, underpinning, bracing and guying, air domes, and others. Typically offered Fall.

485 Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing I 3 Course Prerequisite: CST M 252 with a C or better, or admitted to the major in Architectural Studies, Mechanical Engineering, or Electrical Engineering. Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) portion of the construction industry, focusing on preconstruction services, design, sales and estimating, system, project management, sustainability, and the use of BIM as they relate to MEP. Two field trips required. Typically offered Spring.

485 (Effective through Summer 2021) Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing I 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management, Architectural Studies, Mechanical Engineering, or Electrical Engineering. Mechanical, Electrical, and Plumbing (MEP) portion of the construction industry, focusing on preconstruction services, design, sales and estimating, system, project management, sustainability, and the use of BIM as they relate to MEP. Two field trips required. Typically offered Spring.

495 Seminar in Construction Management V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Construction Management. Advanced study in construction practice management. May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.


Design (DESIGN)

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396 Introduction to Digital Modeling 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Architectural Studies, or Construction Management. Computer-aided drafting (CAD) fundamentals and basic theoretical concepts related to its use in professional design practice.

497 3-D Digital Modeling and Project Information Management II 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Architectural Studies, or Construction Management. Integration of advanced building information modeling (BIM) techniques utilizing complex applications within the Revit software suite. Recommended preparation: DESIGN 397.

498 Advanced Digital Modeling 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Architectural Studies, or Construction Management. Broad integration of Non-Uniform Rational B-spline (NURBS) modeling techniques including practical fundamentals and theoretical concepts of modeling, rendering and animation. Recommended preparation: DESIGN 497.

550 Applications: Using Research in the Inquiry Process 3 Application of scientific research in the advanced design process.

561 Seminar in Design Thinking 3 Course Prerequisite: Doctoral standing in Design. Understanding design thinking or design knowing and translating research and theory into practice.

562 Area Readings 3 Course Prerequisite: DESIGN 561. Forum for the advancement of understanding and discussion of readings related to interdisciplinary design.

563 Directed Readings 3 Course Prerequisite: DESIGN 562. Advanced critical and comprehensive reviews of literature pertinent to student's focus area; development of specialization and expertise in identified area.

564 Design Research Methods 4 Course Prerequisite: DESIGN 562. Development and preparation of research proposals; identification of theories, exploration of research methods and strategies; development of thesis statement and literature review. Recommended preparation: Concurrent enrollment in DESIGN 563; DESIGN 565.

590 Teaching Practicum V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Doctoral standing in Design. Supervised teaching experience integrating application of design knowledge and approaches. S, F grading.

598 Topics in Design V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 hours. Course Prerequisite: Doctoral standing in Design. Topical issues in design responding to the shifting demands and needs of the design professions.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. S, F grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. S, U grading.


Interior Design (I_D)

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101 Design Issues 3 Sensory awareness as a design determinant; introduction to basic design elements in problem identification and solving processes. Credit not granted for both I D 101 and SDC 100.

102 Interior Design Studio I 3 (0-6) Course Prerequisite: I D 101. Interior design problem-solving grounded in aesthetic theories.

103 Transfer Studio 6 (3-6) An intensive studio introducing basic elements and principles of design; basic technical skills (drafting, sketching, rendering, model building).

197 Design Communication I 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. Beginning design communication skills, including manual and digital methods. Recommended preparation: I D 101. Typically offered Fall.

201 Interior Design Studio II 4 (1-9) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. Interior design problem-solving grounded in theories of human behavior. Typically offered Fall.

203 Interior Design Studio III 4 (1-9) Course Prerequisite: I D 201 with a C or better. Interior design problem-solving grounded in theories of spatial organization. Typically offered Spring.

205 Visual Communication 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. Course focuses on the various methods in which the interior designer may choose to visually communicate design concepts. Typically offered Fall.

215 Materials and Components of Interior Design 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. Characteristics and properties of structural and non-structural interior materials. Typically offered Spring.

250 History of Interiors 3 A survey of interior environments, spatial distributions, furnishings, and related design elements from ancient Egypt to the 18th century.

277 Interior Design Study Tour I 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in I D 201. Selected issues in the field of interior design in connection with an organized field trip. Typically offered Fall.

278 Special Topics V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

279 Special Topics: Study Abroad V 1-15 May be repeated for credit. Typically offered Spring and Summer. S, F grading.

297 Design Communication II 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: I D 197; I D 201; I D 205, each with a C or better. Manual and digital design communication skills for 2D/3D design problem solving; integration of current technology and software applications. Typically offered Spring.

303 Immersion Studio 6 (1-10) Course Prerequisite: By permission only. Intense and concentrated experience in design of interior spaces from abstraction and concept to complex interiors of larger scale.

305 Freehand Sketching 3 (2-2) Development of knowledge and skills in freehand sketching to facilitate design exploration and further understanding of the built environment. Typically offered Summer Session.

312 [M] Interior Design Theory 2 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. Theory, principles, and determinants of interior design applied to current practice.

321 Interior Design Studio IV 4 (1-9) Course Prerequisite: I D 203 with a C or better. Interior design problem-solving grounded in place theories. Typically offered Fall.

325 Interior Building Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. Analysis, planning, and application of interior lighting; introduction to HVAC and plumbing systems. Typically offered Fall.

326 Codes for Interior Designers 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. Codes and specifications related to the design of the interior environment, including fire protection standards, accessibility, universal design and acoustics.

333 Interior Design Studio V 4 (1-9) Course Prerequisite: I D 321 with a C or better; I D 397 with a C or better. Interior design problem-solving grounded in organizational theories. Typically offered Spring.

350 [M] History of Interiors II 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. A survey of interior environments, spatial distributions, furnishings, and related design elements in the 19th and 20th centuries.

392 [M] Professional Procedures 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. Business practices and procedures as related to interior design; contract documentation and specification writing. Typically offered Spring.

397 Design Communication III 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: I D 203 with a C or better; I D 297 with a C or better. 3-D digital modeling as a medium to support design visualization, investigation and communication including project information management; emphasis on Revit suite software. Recommended preparation: ID 297 or graduate standing. Typically offered Fall.

415 Advanced Interior Construction and Detailing 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design. Analysis of building construction and detailing which impacts interior space design. Typically offered Spring.

425 Interior Design Studio VI 5 (0-10) Course Prerequisite: I D 333 with a C or better. Interior design problem-solving integrating multidisciplinary theories within a community and/or global context. Typically offered Fall.

426 [CAPS] Interior Design Studio VII 5 (0-10) Course Prerequisite: I D 425 with a C or better; junior standing. Comprehensive studio project that integrates and extends interior design skills; entails research, interpretation, writing, graphic communication, design, and oral presentations. Typically offered Spring.

460 Portfolio and Representation 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Architectural Studies, or Construction Management. Develop communication skills and produce documents necessary to professionally present oneself to prospective employers within the fields of design. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

477 Interior Design Study Tour II 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, Architectural Studies, or Construction Management. Selected issues in the field of interior design in connection with an organized field trip. Typically offered Fall and Spring.

490 Cooperative Education Internship V 1 (0-3) to 12 (0-36) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Off-campus cooperative education internship with business, industry, or government unit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

498 Special Topics in Interior Design V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

520 Historical Perspectives of Interior Space 3 Historical perspectives of interior environments, spatial distributions, furnishings, and related design elements from ancient Egypt to the 18th century. Typically offered Spring.

525 Interior Design Graduate Studio I 5 (0-10) Graduate studio: application of advanced design theories, philosophies and research methodologies to enhance undergraduate design foundations through interdisciplinary studio experiences. Typically offered Fall.

526 Interior Design Graduate Studio II 5 (0-10) Graduate studio: individual thesis topics and the application of advanced design theories, philosophies, and research methodologies to student's focus topic. Typically offered Spring.

530 Philosophies and Theories of the Built Environment 3 Course Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Architecture, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Focus on systematic thought which may describe behavior of the built environment. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 530, I D 530, LND ARCH 530). Typically offered Fall.

540 Research Methods 3 Research methods, from quantitative to technical to philosophical, directed toward qualitative research. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 540, I D 540, LND ARCH 540). Typically offered Spring.

560 Interdisciplinary Seminar 3 Explores approaches to design thinking in the topic areas of people and place, history, theory and criticism, and physical design. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 560, I D 560, LND ARCH 560).

594 Readings in Interior Design 3 Exploration of current topics through readings in interior design. Typically offered Spring.

598 Topics in Interior Design V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Typically offered Spring and Summer.

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


Landscape Architecture (LND_ARCH)

(Select Campus to see schedule links)


150 [HUM] Landscapes of the Palouse 3 Explorations of relationships between people and place in the Palouse landscape and connections between local and global issues; includes community engagement component.

210 Digital Analysis and Representation 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies or Landscape Architecture. Introduction to analysis and representation with a focus on the use of digital tools. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 210, LND ARCH 210). Typically offered Fall.

222 Landscape Architecture Field Experience I 1 (0-2) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Landscape Architecture and concurrent enrollment in LND ARCH 262. Field study of landscapes, designers and design firms through travel experiences. Recommended preparation: Sophomore standing and concurrent enrollment in LND ARCH 262. Typically offered Fall.

262 Landscape Architectural Design I 4 (0-8) Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Landscape Architecture. Basic design principles and design processes at local regional scales; integration of design graphics and verbal/visual presentations. Field trip required. Typically offered Fall.

263 Landscape Architectural Design II 4 (0-8) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 262 with a C or better. Basic design and graphic techniques related to solving of elementary design problems. Typically offered Spring.

297 Digital Design Communication 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 262 with a C or better. Digital design communication skills for 2D/3D design problem solving; integration of current technology and software applications. Typically offered Spring.

327 Theory in Landscape Architecture 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Landscape Architecture, Architectural Studies, Interior Design, or Construction Management; junior standing. Theories and frameworks that inform and emerge from the practices and outcomes of landscape architecture. Typically offered Fall.

333 Landscape Architecture Field Experience II 1 (0-2) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Landscape Architecture or junior standing. Field study of landscapes, designers and design firms through travel experiences. Typically offered Spring.

362 Landscape Architectural Design III 4 (0-8) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 263 with a C or better. Professional site design processes; concentration on planting and site planning, design with urban community, ecological, and open-space projects. Typically offered Fall.

363 Landscape Architectural Design IV 4 (2-6) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 362 with a C or better. Professional site design processes; concentration on recreation facilities and site planning within residential, urban, institutional, and regional projects. Typically offered Spring.

365 Landscape Architectural Construction I 4 (2-6) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 262 with a C or better; sophomore standing. Basic site planning and construction operations, including grading, drainage, storm water management, and construction document techniques. Typically offered Spring.

366 Landscape Architectural Construction II 4 (2-6) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 365 with a C or better. Construction materials and methods, specifications, cost estimating, and construction document preparation. Typically offered Fall.

367 Landscape Architectural Construction III 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 366 with a C or better. Supplemental projects in cost estimating, specifications, construction detailing, and landscape architectural design/build. Typically offered Spring.

380 Ecological Applications in Design 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: Admitted major in Landscape Architecture; junior standing. Fundamental concepts of ecology as a philosophy and a science; emphasis on community, landscape restoration, and historical ecology as they relate to design. Field trip required. Typically offered Spring.

399 Professional Work Experience: Office Practice V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Landscape Architecture. Planned professional work experience in design and office practice as approved by faculty; written report and presentation to faculty required. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

450 [M] Principles and Practice of Planning 3 Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 363 with a C or better; junior standing. History, theory, methods, and processes in regional planning; contemporary issues and professional practice. Typically offered Fall.

467 Regional Landscape Inventory and Analysis 4 (2-6) Course Prerequisite: SOE 101 or SOIL SCI 201. Application of ecological planning process for landscape inventory and analysis. Typically offered Fall.

470 Landscape Architectural Design V 4 (1-9) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 363 with a C or better. Advanced group and individual landscape architectural design and planning projects; professional applications of site design theory and design processes. Typically offered Fall.

477 Landscape Applications of Geographic Information Systems 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 467 with a C or better. GIS-based spatial data development and analysis skills in an applied, real-world context.

480 Professional Practice 2 Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 363 with a C or better. Current office practices, design and construction management techniques; introduction to construction contract legal requirements within the practice of landscape architecture. Typically offered Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

485 [CAPS] [M] Senior Comprehensive Project 4 (0-8) Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 470 or 490, with a C or better; senior standing. Individually developed studio project that integrates and extends landscape architectural skills; entails research, interpretation, writing, graphic communication, design, oral presentations. Typically offered Spring.

490 Cooperative Education Internship 4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 8 hours. Course Prerequisite: LND ARCH 363 with a C or better. Off-campus cooperative education internship with a design firm/business, non-profit organization, industry, or government unit. Typically offered Fall.

491 Topics in Design 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Landscape Architecture, Architectural Studies, Interior Design, or Construction Management; junior standing.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

520 The Northern Rocky Mountain Regional Landscape 4 (2-4) Biophysical characteristics of the Northern Rocky Mountain regional landscape. Typically offered Fall and Spring. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

521 Cultural Interpretation of the Regional Landscape 4 (2-4) Cultural characteristics of the Northern Rocky Mountain regional landscape. Typically offered Fall. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

525 Landscape Modeling 3 (1-6) Visual and cartographic landscape modeling through application of GIS and visualization technologies to landscape changes.

530 Philosophies and Theories of the Built Environment 3 Course Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Architecture, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Focus on systematic thought which may describe behavior of the built environment. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 530, I D 530, LND ARCH 530). Typically offered Fall.

540 Research Methods 3 Research methods, from quantitative to technical to philosophical, directed toward qualitative research. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 540, I D 540, LND ARCH 540). Typically offered Spring.

560 Interdisciplinary Seminar 3 Explores approaches to design thinking in the topic areas of people and place, history, theory and criticism, and physical design. (Crosslisted course offered as ARCH 560, I D 560, LND ARCH 560).

600 Special Projects or Independent Study V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent study, special projects, and/or internships. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor before enrolling in 600 credit, which cannot be used toward the core graded credits required for a graduate degree. Typically offered Fall and Spring. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, U grading.


School Of Design And Construction (SDC)

(Select Campus to see schedule links)


100 [ARTS] World of Design and Construction 3 Exploration of architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, and construction management through equity, environment, and economy; careers in the built environment considered. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

120 Foundational Drawing 3 (0-6) Development of skills relating to drawing 2D and 3D objects, one and two point perspective as well as orthographic projection. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

140 Foundation Studio I 3 (0-6) Course Prerequisite: SDC 120 with a C or better. Exploration and communication of theories and concepts related to basic 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional principles of built space. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

250 Global History of Design I 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Global developments in design through the seventeenth century CE. Typically offered Fall.

300 Fabrication Lab Practice 1 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, or Construction Management. Hands-on exploration of School of Design and Construction shop facilities. Students complete a small project while learning safe and efficient use of woodshop machines and hand tools. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

350 [M] Global History of Design II 3 Course Prerequisite: SDC 250 with a C or better. Global developments in design from the seventeenth century CE to the present day. Typically offered Spring.

444 Integrated Study Tour 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, or Construction Management. Selected issues in the field of design and construction in connection with an organized field trip. Typically offered Fall.

473 [M] Professional Practice 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Architectural Studies, Construction Management, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Current professional practice issues related to the business and practice of design and construction. Typically offered Spring.

488 Professional Practice Coop/Internship I V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; integration of coursework with on-the-job professional experience. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 488, BIO ENG 488, CHE 488, CE 488, CPT S 488, E E 488, ME 488, MSE 488, SDC 488). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

489 Professional Practice Coop/Internship II 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 3 hours. Course Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; by department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; continuation of ENGR 488. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 489, SDC 489). Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

495 Seminar in Design and Construction 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 12 hours. Course Prerequisite: ARCH 203 with a C or better, I D 203 with a C or better, or LND ARCH 263 with a C or better; or graduate standing. Interdisciplinary exploration of issues, projects, and research relevant to the field of design and construction. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

498 Special Topics in Design and Construction 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: ARCH 203 with a C or better, I D 203 with a C or better, or LND ARCH 263 with a C or better, or graduate standing. Advanced study in topics related to the design and construction disciplines. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer. S, F grading.

555 Global Engagement in Design and Construction 3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 hours. Course Prerequisite: Graduate student in Architecture, Interior Design, or Landscape Architecture. Engagement with contemporary and historical issues relevant to the built environment, landscape, climate, industry, and/or culture of the city, region, or country under consideration.

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