The Washington State University General Catalog

Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective.

Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering

voiland.wsu.edu
Wegner Hall 105
509-335-4332

Director, S. Ha; Regents Professor and Voiland Distinguished Professor, Y. Wang; Professor and Paul Hohenschuh Distinguished Professor, A. Kostyukova; Professors, B. Ahring, H. Beyenal, P. Pfromm, M. Rezac, K. Schulz, B. J. Van Wie, X. Zhang; Associate Professors, W. Dong, D. Lin, H. Lin, J-S. McEwen, S. Saunders, A. Vasavada; Assistant Professors, D. Scalise, D. Tolkatchev, D. Wu; Professors Emeriti, D. C. Davis, H. Davis, C. F. Ivory, N. Kruse, K. C. Liddell, R. Mahalingam, R. C. Miller, J. N. Petersen, W. J. Thomson, R. Zollars.

The mission of the Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering is to deliver academic programs in Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering that advance the boundaries of knowledge, educate competent engineering professionals, and contribute to the needs of society. Faculty, staff, and students engage in discovery, teaching, application, and integration, along with periodic review of achievement, to develop practitioners and scholars prepared to make meaningful and responsible contributions to society.

The Program Educational Objectives for baccalaureate degree programs in Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering define achievements of which these graduates are capable.  As appropriate for their chosen career paths, within five to ten years of graduation, program graduates will be able to:

  1. Engage successfully in graduate or professional education or entry-level employment.
  2. Perform responsibly and professionally in their chosen career paths.
  3. Exhibit continued growth of effective communication and collaboration skills.
  4. Demonstrate ongoing development of competent and innovative problem solving skills.
  5. Continue learning and accept increasing levels of responsibility over time.

These long-term educational objectives will be achieved through development of our Student Outcomes in a culture of integration and engagement. Student Outcomes lay a solid, well-rounded foundation from which to build longer-term capabilities. Systemic integration of theory and practice deepens students’ understanding and builds confidence they will need for bold innovation and lifelong learning. Frequent engagement of students with peers, faculty, and external constituencies builds their interpersonal skills, refines their understanding, and leads them to opportunities for advanced study or employment. Dedicated faculty who effectively teach, mentor, refer, and model professional behaviors prepare our graduates for the professional world.

The school offers courses of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Bioengineering, Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering, Master of Science in Chemical Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy, with a focus in chemical engineering. We also graduate students who receive the Master of Science in Engineering and the Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Science with an emphasis in bioengineering.

Chemical Engineering

The curriculum in chemical engineering provides thorough knowledge of basic science and engineering. This includes material and energy balances, chemical and physical equilibria, rate processes, and economic balances. With such training, graduates may participate in the design and operation of chemically based products or they may engage in research leading to new or improved chemical processes, products, and uses. Graduates also find rewarding work in plant operation, plant management, university teaching, sales-service, and other functions requiring chemical engineering training. Many students also use their educations in chemical engineering as preparation for other professional degrees such as medicine or law. The chemical engineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

Student Learning Outcomes

To guide our student activities in developing the skills to meet the School's objectives we will monitor their attainment of the Student Outcomes as set forth by ABET.  These are: 1) an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics, 2) an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors, 3) an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences, 4) an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts, 5) an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives, 6) an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions, and 7) an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

In addition to these Outcomes we will also monitor the program criteria for chemical, biochemical, biomolecular or similarly named engineering programs, as set forth by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).  These criteria are, respectively:  “The curriculum must provide (1) a thorough grounding in the basic sciences including chemistry, physics, and biology, with some content at an advanced level, as appropriate to the objectives of the program. The curriculum must include (2) the engineering application of these basic sciences to the design, analysis, and control of chemical, physical, and/or biological processes, including the hazards associated with these processes.” (Numerals added to original AIChE statement).

Online at:  https://voiland.wsu.edu/undergraduate/che/

Bioengineering

Bioengineering is an engineering discipline that integrates engineering and life sciences to address issues important to human and animal well-being and to society at large. As such, the educational objective of the BS Bioengineering degree is to prepare graduates for productive employment, advanced study, or professional programs where they apply principles and methods of both engineering and life sciences to solve problems affecting human and animal health and well-being. Graduates may apply their expertise in human and animal medicine, biotechnology, or related biology-based engineering fields.

With these integrated science and engineering skills, bioengineering graduates are able to make valuable contributions to human and animal health care and environments, bio-based product development, and biotechnology. At Washington State University, bioengineering cooperates with and finds applications in numerous disciplines of engineering, veterinary medicine, and medical sciences. The bioengineering curriculum easily accommodates pre-medical, pre-dental, and pre-veterinary requirements for those students wishing to apply to professional schools in health care fields. The bioengineering program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, www.abet.org.

Student Learning Outcomes

Bioengineering graduates are able to demonstrate the following Student Outcomes: 

  1. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics.
  2. An ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors.
  3. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
  4. An ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
  5. An ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives.
  6. An ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions.
  7. An ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies.

Online at  https://voiland.wsu.edu/undergraduate/be/

Computer Requirement

All Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering students are required to purchase laptop computers. Computer requirements are described at https://voiland.wsu.edu/undergraduate/computer-requirement/.

 Transfer Students

Students who are planning to transfer to Chemical Engineering or Bioengineering at Washington State University from other institutions should coordinate their programs with the school to establish a schedule of studies leading to the bachelor’s degree. This is desirable because of sophomore professional requirements and course sequences. A strong preparation in chemistry, mathematics (through differential equations), and physics is necessary prior to transfer to minimize the time required at Washington State University to complete bachelor’s degree requirements. Inquiries concerning specific questions are welcomed. 

Preparation for Graduate Study

As preparation for work toward an advanced degree in Chemical Engineering, a student should have completed the equivalent of the following chemical engineering schedule of studies. A Bachelor of Science degree in Chemical Engineering from an institution with an ABET accredited program normally will satisfy this requirement.

Students seeking advanced training in bioengineering should use the Engineering Science degree program. Such students should have completed the equivalent of the bioengineering program outlined above. A Bachelor of Science degree from any ABET accredited engineering program would normally satisfy this requirement.

Special programs are also available for students with bachelor’s degrees in chemistry, biology, or other areas of science who wish to obtain advanced degrees.




Schedules of Studies

Honors students complete the Honors College requirements which replace the UCORE requirements.


Bioengineering - Biomedical Systems Option (120 Credits)

At least 50 of the total credits required for this degree must be in 300-400-level courses.

Students who plan to pursue pre-med studies should consult their advisor for further information about appropriate courses.

Admission to the Major Criteria – Bioengineering Program

Incoming first-year students, transfer students, and students changing from a different major may be admitted to the Bioengineering degree program upon completion of MATH 171 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment, and CHEM 105 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. To remain in the major the student must earn a grade of C or better in all courses and maintain good academic standing (i.e. a 2.0 or higher GPA each term and an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 at WSU).

Students who are deficient under the University’s Academic Regulations 38 and 39 or whose GPA in Bioengineering courses falls below 2.0 are subject to loss of eligibility of the major. The Bioengineering undergraduate studies committee will determine the eligibility for readmission and probation conditions for students who are deficient and apply for re-entry into the major.

Graduation Requirements
No Washington State University courses listed in this schedule of study may be taken on a pass/fail basis. With the exception of BIO ENG 140, 488, 495, 499, and ENGR 489, all listed BIO ENG courses, required electives, and the prerequisites to these courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.
First Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 1401
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
ENGR 12012
HISTORY 105 [ROOT] or 305 [ROOT]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
Second TermCredits
BIOLOGY 107 [BSCI]4
CHEM 106 or 1164
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 172 or 1824
Second Year
First TermCredits
CHE 2013
CHEM 3454
MATH 220 or 2302 or 3
MATH 273 or 2832
PHYSICS 201 and 211, or 2054 or 5
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 2103
MATH 3153
MBIOS 3034
PHYSICS 202 and 212, or 2064 or 5
UCORE Inquiry23
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 3103
BIO ENG 3153
BIO ENG 325 [M]2
C E 2113
STAT 370 or 4233
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 3053
BIO ENG 3503
BIO ENG 36033
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
E E 2613
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 410 [M]3
BIO ENG 42043
BIO ENG 4303
ECONS 101 [SSCI], 102 [SSCI], or 1983
UCORE Inquiry23
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 411 [CAPS]3
BIO ENG 4403
Bioengineering Electives33
Technical Electives43
UCORE Inquiry23
Complete BIO ENG Exit Interview

Footnotes
13 credit 300-400-level engineering course may be substituted for ENGR 120 by approval of advisor.
2Must complete 3 of these 4 UCORE designations: ARTS, DIVR, EQJS, HUM.
3Bioengineering Electives (3 credits): Any 400-level BIO ENG course not used to fulfill major requirements. A maximum of 3 credits is allowed in BIO ENG 488, 495, and 499 combined.
4Technical Electives (3 credits): Approved courses include BIOLOGY 106, 251, CPT S 121, E E 214, 262, ME 116, 212, 216, MSE 201, any 300-400 level BIO ENG, BIOLOGY, CE, CHE, CHEM, CPT S, E E, MATH, MBIOS, ME, MSE, NEUROSCI, PHYSICS, or STAT course as approved, or other courses as approved by advisor.

Bioengineering - Cellular and Molecular Option (120 Credits)

At least 50 of the total credits required for this degree must be in 300-400-level courses.

Students who plan to pursue pre-med studies should consult their advisor for further information about appropriate courses.

Admission to the Major Criteria – Bioengineering Program
Incoming first-year students, transfer students, and students changing from a different major may be admitted to the Bioengineering degree program upon completion of MATH 171 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment, and CHEM 105 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. To remain in the major the student must earn a grade of C or better in all courses and maintain good academic standing (i.e. a 2.0 or higher GPA each term and an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 at WSU).

Students who are deficient under the University’s Academic Regulations 38 and 39 or whose GPA in Bioengineering courses falls below 2.0 are subject to loss of eligibility of the major. The Bioengineering undergraduate studies committee will determine the eligibility for readmission and probation conditions for students who are deficient and apply for re-entry into the major.

Graduation Requirements
No Washington State University courses listed in this schedule of study may be taken on a pass/fail basis. With the exception of BIO ENG 140, 488, 495, 499, and ENGR 489, all listed BIO ENG courses, required electives, and the prerequisites to these courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.


First Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 1401
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
ENGR 12012
HISTORY 105 [ROOT] or 305 [ROOT]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
Second TermCredits
BIOLOGY 107 [BSCI]4
CHEM 106 or 1164
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 172 or 1824
Second Year
First TermCredits
CHE 2013
CHEM 3454
MATH 220 or 2302 or 3
MATH 273 or 2832
PHYSICS 201 and 211, or 2054 or 5
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 2103
MATH 3153
MBIOS 3034
PHYSICS 202 and 212, or 2064 or 5
UCORE Inquiry23
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 3103
BIO ENG 3153
BIO ENG 325 [M]2
MBIOS 301, 305, or 4133
STAT 370 or 4233
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 3053
BIO ENG 3503
BIO ENG 3603
Bioengineering Elective33
Communication [COMM] or Written Communication [WRTG]3
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 410 [M]3
BIO ENG 4563
BIO ENG 4753
ECONS 101 [SSCI], 102 [SSCI], or 1983
UCORE Inquiry23
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 411 [CAPS]3
BIO ENG 4763
Bioengineering Elective33
Technical Elective43
UCORE Inquiry23

Footnotes
13 credit 300-400 level engineering course may be substituted for ENGR 120 by approval of advisor.
2Must complete 3 of these 4 UCORE designations: ARTS, DIVR, EQJS, HUM.
3Bioengineering Electives (6 credits): Any 400-level BIO ENG course not used to fulfill major requirements. A maximum of 3 credits is allowed in BIO ENG 488, 495, and 499 combined. Students completing the Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering option may replace three credits with three credits of a 300-400-level CHE course with advisor approval
4Technical Electives (3 credits): Approved courses include BIOLOGY 106, 251, CPT S 121, E E 214, 262, ME 116, 212, 216, MSE 201, any 300-400 level BIO ENG, BIOLOGY, CE, CHE, CHEM, CPT S, E E, MATH, MBIOS, ME, MSE, NEUROSCI, PHYSICS, or STAT course as approved, or other courses as approved by advisor.

Bioengineering - Pre-Med - Biomedical Systems Option (128 Credits)

At least 50 of the total credits required for this degree must be in 300-400-level courses.

Students who plan to pursue pre-med studies should consult their advisor for further information about appropriate courses.

Admission to the Major Criteria – Bioengineering Program
Incoming first-year students, transfer students, and students changing from a different major may be admitted to the Bioengineering degree program upon completion of MATH 171 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment, and CHEM 105 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. To remain in the major the student must earn a grade of C or better in all courses and maintain good academic standing (i.e., a 2.0 or higher GPA each term and an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 at WSU).

Students who are deficient under the University’s Academic Regulations 38 and 39 or whose GPA in Bioengineering courses falls below 2.0 are subject to loss of eligibility of the major. The Bioengineering undergraduate studies committee will determine the eligibility for readmission and probation conditions for students who are deficient and apply for re-entry into the major.

Graduation Requirements
No Washington State University courses listed in this schedule of study may be taken on a pass/fail basis. With the exception of BIO ENG 140, 488, 495, 499, and ENGR 489, all listed BIO ENG courses, required electives, and the prerequisites to these courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.
First Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 1401
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
ENGR 12012
HISTORY 105 [ROOT] or 305 [ROOT]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
Second TermCredits
BIOLOGY 107 [BSCI]4
CHEM 106 or 1164
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 172 or 1824
UCORE Inquiry23
Second Year
First TermCredits
CHE 2013
CHEM 3454
MATH 220 or 2302 or 3
MATH 273 or 2832
PHYSICS 201 and 211, or 2054 or 5
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 2103
CHEM 3484
MATH 3153
MBIOS 3034
PHYSICS 202 and 212, or 2064 or 5
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 3103
BIO ENG 3153
BIO ENG 325 [M]2
BIOLOGY 1064
C E 2113
STAT 370 or 4233
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 3053
BIO ENG 3503
BIO ENG 3603
E E 2613
ENGLISH 402 [WRTG] or 403 [WRTG]3
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 410 [M]3
BIO ENG 4203
BIO ENG 4303
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI] or 1983
UCORE Inquiry23
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 411 [CAPS]3
BIO ENG 4403
Bioengineering Electives33
MBIOS 301, 305, 401, or 4133 or 4
UCORE Inquiry23
Complete BIO ENG Exit Interview

Footnotes
13 credit 300-400 level engineering course may be substituted for ENGR 120 by approval of advisor.
2Must complete 3 of these 4 UCORE designations: ARTS, DIVR, EQJS, HUM.
3Bioengineering Electives (3 credits): Any 400-level BIO ENG course not used to fulfill major requirements. A maximum of 3 credits is allowed in BIO ENG 488, 495, and 499 combined.

Bioengineering - Pre-Med – Cellular and Molecular Option (128 Credits)

At least 50 of the total credits required for this degree must be in 300-400-level courses.

Students who plan to pursue pre-med studies should consult their advisor for further information about appropriate courses.

Admission to the Major Criteria – Bioengineering Program
Incoming first-year students, transfer students, and students changing from a different major may be admitted to the Bioengineering degree program upon completion of MATH 171 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment, and CHEM 105 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. To remain in the major the student must earn a grade of C or better in all courses and maintain good academic standing (i.e., a 2.0 or higher GPA each term and an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 at WSU).

Students who are deficient under the University’s Academic Regulations 38 and 39 or whose GPA in Bioengineering courses falls below 2.0 are subject to loss of eligibility of the major. The Bioengineering undergraduate studies committee will determine the eligibility for readmission and probation conditions for students who are deficient and apply for re-entry into the major.

Graduation Requirements
No Washington State University courses listed in this schedule of study may be taken on a pass/fail basis. With the exception of BIO ENG 140, 488, 495, 499, and ENGR 489, all listed BIO ENG courses, required electives, and the prerequisites to these courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.
First Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 1401
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
ENGR 12012
HISTORY 105 [ROOT] or 305 [ROOT]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
Second TermCredits
BIOLOGY 107 [BSCI]4
CHEM 106 or 1164
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 172 or 1824
UCORE Inquiry23
Second Year
First TermCredits
CHE 2013
CHEM 3454
MATH 220 or 2302 or 3
MATH 273 or 2832
PHYSICS 201 and 211, or 2054 or 5
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 2103
CHEM 3484
MATH 3153
MBIOS 3034
PHYSICS 202 and 212, or 2064 or 5
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 3103
BIO ENG 3153
BIO ENG 325 [M]2
BIOLOGY 1064
MBIOS 301, 305, 401, or 4133 or 4
STAT 370 or 4233
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 3053
BIO ENG 3503
BIO ENG 3603
ENGLISH 402 [WRTG] or 403 [WRTG]3
Technical Elective33
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
BIO ENG 410 [M]3
BIO ENG 4563
BIO ENG 4753
ECONS 101 [SSCI], 102 [SSCI], or 198 3
UCORE Inquiry23
Second TermCredits
BIO ENG 411 [CAPS]3
BIO ENG 4763
Bioengineering Electives46
UCORE Inquiry23

Footnotes
1A 3 credit 300-400 level engineering course may be substituted for ENGR 120 by approval of advisor.
2Must complete 3 of these 4 UCORE designations: ARTS, DIVR, EQJS, HUM.
3Technical Electives (3 credits): Approved courses include BIOLOGY 251, C E 211, CPT S 121, E E 214, 261, 262, ME 116, 212, 216, MSE 201, any 300-400 level BIO ENG, BIOLOGY, CE, CHE, CHEM, CPT S, E E, MATH, MBIOS, ME, MSE, NEUROSCI, PHYSICS, or STAT course, or other courses as approved by advisor.
4Bioengineering Electives (3 credits): Any 400-level BIO ENG course not used to fulfill major requirements. A maximum of 3 credits is allowed in BIO ENG 488, 495, and 499 combined. Students may replace three credits with three credits of a 300-400-level CHE course or an additional MBIOS 301, 305, 401, or 413 with advisor approval.

Chemical Engineering - General (121 Credits)

At least 59 of the total hours required for this degree must be in 300-400-level courses.

Admission to the Major Criteria – Chemical Engineering Program
Incoming first-year students, transfer students, and students changing from a different major may be admitted to the Chemical Engineering degree program upon completion of MATH 171 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment, and CHEM 105 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. To remain in the major the student must earn a grade of C or better in all CHE courses, earn a grade of C or better in all required electives, and maintain good academic standing (i.e. a 2.0 or higher GPA each term and an overall cumulative GPA of 2.0 at WSU).

Students who are deficient under the University’s Academic Regulations 38 and 39 or whose GPA in CHE courses falls below 2.0 are subject to loss of eligibility of the major. The Chemical Engineering undergraduate studies committee will determine the eligibility for readmission and probation conditions for students who are deficient and apply for re-entry into the major.

Graduation Requirements
No Washington State University courses listed in this schedule of study may be taken on a pass/fail basis. With the exception of CHE 488, 495, 498, 499 and ENGR 489, all listed CHE courses, required electives, and the prerequisites to these courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.
First Year
First TermCredits
CHE 1011
CHEM 105 [PSCI]4
HISTORY 105 [ROOT] or 305 [ROOT]3
MATH 171 [QUAN]4
UCORE Inquiry13
Second TermCredits
BIOLOGY 106 [BSCI] or 107 [BSCI]4
CHE 11022
CHEM 106 or 1164
ENGLISH 101 [WRTG]3
MATH 172 or 1824
Second Year
First TermCredits
CHE 2013
CHEM 3454
MATH 273 or 2832
PHYSICS 201 and 211, or 2054 or 5
UCORE Inquiry13
Second TermCredits
CHE 2113
CHEM 348 or MBIOS 303 4
MATH 220 or 2302 or 3
MATH 3153
PHYSICS 202 and 212, or 2064 or 5
Complete Writing Portfolio
Third Year
First TermCredits
CHE 3013
CHE 3103
CHE 4981
ENGLISH 402 [WRTG] [M] or 403 [WRTG] [M]3
UCORE Inquiry13
Technical Elective2,33
Second TermCredits
CHE 3023
CHE 3213
CHE 3323
CHE 3343
Fourth Year
First TermCredits
CHE 3523
CHE 432 [M]3
CHE 4413
CHE 4503
ECONS 101 [SSCI] or 102 [SSCI] or 1983
Second TermCredits
CHE 433 [M]2
CHE 451 [M] [CAPS]3
CHE Elective2,46
Technical Elective2,33
Exit Interview

Footnotes
1Must complete 3 of these 4 UCORE designations: ARTS, DIVR, EQJS, HUM.
2Three credit 300-400-level CHE course may be substituted for CHE 110 by approval of advisor. The CHE course can be included as three credits of the CHE or Technical Electives.
3Technical Electives (6 credits): MSE 201 or any 300-400-level BIO ENG, CHEM, CHE, CE, E E, ENGR, MATH, ME, MSE, PHYSICS, or STAT course as approved by advisor.
4CHE Electives (6 credits): Any 400-level CHE course not used to fulfill major requirements. A maximum of 3 credits is allowed in CHE 488, 495, and 499 combined.


Minors

Chemical Engineering

 

The minor in Chemical Engineering requires a minimum of 16 credits. A minimum of nine credits must include 300-400-level coursework taken in residence at WSU or through WSU-approved education abroad or educational exchange courses.  All courses used for the minor must be completed with a grade of C or better and no courses used for the minor may be taken with pass/fail grading. A minimum 2.0 GPA is required for all courses used for the minor.

 

Requirements include completion of:

  1. CHE 101 and CHE 201

 

  2. One 300-level, 3-credit course in thermodynamics from the following approved courses:   BIOENG 315, CHE 301, CHEM 331, ME 301, or another course with departmental approval

 

  3. One 300-level, 3-credit course in transport phenomena covering at least two modes of transport (e.g., momentum, mass, heat) from the following approved courses: BIOENG 310, CHE 310, ME 303 and ME 304 (must be taken together), or another course with departmental approval. (Note that fulfilling this requirement with ME 303 and 304 will satisfy only 3 credits toward the minor. Also, students who fulfill the transport phenomena requirement with ME 303 and 304 cannot use CHE 332 to fulfill the 6 additional credits below.)

 

  4. 6 additional credits of Chemical Engineering content from courses taken at the 300-, 400-, or      500-level. Note that courses may require prerequisites or departmental approval prior to              enrollment, and CHE 488, 489, 498, and 499 may not be used to satisfy this requirement.

 

 

 



Courses

The online catalog includes the most recent changes to courses and degree requirements that have been approved by the Faculty Senate, including changes that are not yet effective. Courses showing two entries of the same number indicate that the course information is changing. The most recently approved version is shown first, followed by the older version, in gray, with its last-effective term preceding the course title. Courses shown in gray with only one entry of the course number are being discontinued. Course offerings by term can be accessed by clicking on the term links when viewing a specific campus catalog.


Bioengineering (BIO_ENG)

(Select Campus to see schedule links)


140 Introduction to Bioengineering 1 Seminar on current topics and issues in bioengineering; career options in bioengineering. S, F grading.

205 Bioengineering Professional Preparation and Ethics 1 Professional preparation for careers in bioengineering; ethical, social, and professional issues in bioengineering. S, F grading.

210 Bioengineering Problem Solving 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 201 with a C or better; MATH 315 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Methods for analysis and problem solving in bioengineering; introduction to mathematical modeling, programming, and numerical methods for bioengineering applications.

305 Bioengineering Ethics and Professional Development 3 Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Bioengineering. Ethical topics in bioengineering, including responsibilities to society and scientific conduct; topics related to the professional development of bioengineers.

310 Bioengineering Transport Phenomena 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 201 with a C or better; MATH 315 with a C or better; BIO ENG 210, with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment. Introduction and application of the concepts of momentum, mass, and thermal energy transport in the context of problems of interest in biology, medicine, and engineering.

310 (Effective through Summer 2024) Introduction to Transport Processes 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 201 with a C or better; MATH 315 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; BIO ENG 205 or both CHE 101 and CHE 211 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Chem Engr or Bioengr. Fundamentals of the phenomena governing the transport of momentum, energy, and mass. (Crosslisted course offered as CHE 310, BIO ENG 310).

315 Thermodynamics and Kinetics in Biological Systems 3 Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 210 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; CHE 201 with a C or better. Fundamental concepts and laws, property relationships, coupled phenomena, as well as theoretical modeling and experimental analysis applied to biological processes and regulation.

321 Mechanics of Biological Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: CE 211 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Bioengineering. Mechanical behavior of biological and engineering materials; relationships between external loads and internal stresses and strains within a structure.

322 [M] Mechanics of Biological Materials Lab 1 (0-3) Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 321 or concurrent enrollment; and STAT 370 or concurrent enrollment or STAT 423 or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Bioengineering. Laboratory experiments focused on mechanics of biological and engineering materials; experimental design and statistical analysis of data; scientific writing.

325 [M] Introduction to Bioengineering Research and Clinical Instrumentation 2 (1-3) Course Prerequisite: MATH 315 with a C or better; MBIOS 303 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; PHYSICS 202 and 212, each with a C or better. Principles of measurement systems for bioengineering applications, data analysis, and troubleshooting.

325 (Effective through Summer 2024) [M] Introduction to Bioengineering Research and Clinical Instrumentation 2 (1-3) Course Prerequisite: MATH 315; MBIOS 303 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; PHYSICS 202 and 212 with a C or better. Principles of measurement systems for bioengineering applications, data analysis, and troubleshooting.

330 Bioinstrumentation 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: E E 261 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Bioengineering. Principles of instrumentation applicable to bioengineering systems; experimental design for measurement systems.

340 Unified Systems Bioengineering I 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 210 or concurrent enrollment; E E 261 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Bioengineering. Foundation for dynamic modeling and design of physiological systems; part one of two-semester course.

350 Introduction to Cellular Bioengineering 3 Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 315 with a C or better; BIO ENG 325 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Bioengineering. Integrating cellular biology and engineering science by applying quantitative engineering principles for development of cellular-based materials, diagnostic devices and sensor designs.

350 (Effective through Summer 2024) Introduction to Cellular Bioengineering 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 315 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Bioengineering. Integrating cellular biology and engineering science by applying quantitative engineering principles for development of cellular-based materials, diagnostic devices and sensor designs.

360 Quantitative Physiology 3 Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 310; BIO ENG 315; BIO ENG 325, each with a C or better. Mathematical and engineering analysis of major mammalian physiological systems, including excitable cells, cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems.

410 [M] Bioengineering Capstone Project I 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 305, BIO ENG 350, and BIO ENG 360, each with a C or better; BIO_ENG 456 and BIO_ENG 475, OR BIO ENG 420 and BIO ENG 430, each with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Bioengineering. Part I of capstone engineering design project; problem definition, design requirements, conceptual design, detail design, and technical writing and presentation.

410 (Effective through Fall 2024) [M] Bioengineering Capstone Project I 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 321 with a C or better; BIO ENG 322 with a C or better; BIO ENG 330 with a C or better; BIO ENG 340 with a C or better. Part I of capstone engineering design project; customer needs, design requirements, conceptual design, business assessment, project proposal, and presentation.

411 [CAPS] Bioengineering Capstone Project II 3 (2-2) Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 410 with a C or better; senior standing. Detailed design and business case for a biological engineering-related process, machine, structure, or system. Recommended preparation: ECONS 101 or 102.

420 Mechanics of Biological Materials 3 Course Prerequisite: CE 211 with a C or better; senior standing. Mechanical behavior of biological and engineering materials; relationships between external loads and internal stresses and strains within a structure.

425 Biomechanics 3 Course Prerequisite: CE 211 with a C or better; MATH 315 with a C or better. Methods for analysis of rigid body and deformable mechanics; application to biological tissue, especially bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendon and muscle. (Crosslisted course offered as BIO ENG 425/525, ME 525). Credit not granted for more than one of BIO ENG 425, BIO ENG 525, or ME 525. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

425 (Effective through Summer 2024) Biomechanics 3 Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 321 with a C or better or CE 215 with a C or better; MATH 315 with a C or better. Methods for analysis of rigid body and deformable mechanics; application to biological tissue, especially bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendon and muscle. (Crosslisted course offered as BIO ENG 425/525, ME 525). Credit not granted for more than one of BIO ENG 425, BIO ENG 525, or ME 525. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

430 Bioinstrumentation 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 325; E E 261, each with a C or better. Principles of instrumentation applicable to bioengineering systems; experimental design for measurement systems.

435 Bioelectric Phenomena and Devices 3 Course Prerequisite: E E 261 or 304; junior standing. The electrophysiology of excitable tissues (neurons and muscle) and human health applications involving recording activity or stimulating these tissues. Engineering principles are integrated with neural physiology for design and analysis of biomedical devices.

440 Biological Control Systems 3 (2-3) Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 360 with a C or better. Feedback control system analysis and design, with applications to physiological and biomedical engineering systems.

440 (Effective through Fall 2024) Unified Systems Bioengineering II 4 (3-3) Course Prerequisite: BIO ENG 210 with a C or better; BIO ENG 340 with a C or better. Continuation of BIO ENG 340; emphasis on feedback control system analysis and design, with examples from physiological systems.

455 Metabolic Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 201 with a C or better; MATH 220 and MATH 315 with a C or better; BIO ENG 210 or CHE 211 with a C or better. Understanding metabolic properties of organisms such that cells can be modified for use as biochemical plants to produce desired bioproducts. (Crosslisted course offered as BIO ENG 455, CHE 474).

456 Protein Bioengineering 3 Course Prerequisite: Senior standing. Integrating molecular biology and engineering sciences to analyze, change, and design proteins' structure and function. Credit not granted for both BIO ENG 456 and 556. Recommended preparation: Organic chemistry and/or biochemistry. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

475 Biochemical Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 321 and 332 each with a C or better, OR BIO ENG 310 and 350 each with a C or better. Application of chemical engineering principles to the processing of biological and biochemical materials. (Crosslisted course offered as CHE 475, BIO ENG 475.) Credit not granted for both CHE 475/BIO ENG 475 and CHE 575. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

475 (Effective through Summer 2024) Introduction to Biochemical Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 321 and 332 each with a C or better, OR BIO ENG 310, and 340, and 350 each with a C or better. Application of chemical engineering principles to the processing of biological and biochemical materials. (Crosslisted course offered as CHE 475, BIO ENG 475.)

476 Biomedical Engineering Principles 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 310 with a C or better. The application of chemical engineering principles to biomedical processes. (Crosslisted course offered as CHE 476, BIO ENG 476.)

481 Advanced Topics in Bioengineering V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By instructor permission; junior standing. Advanced topics in bioengineering.

488 Professional Practice Coop/Internship I V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; integration of coursework with on-the-job professional experience. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 488, BIO ENG 488, CHE 488, CE 488, CPT S 488, E E 488, ME 488, MSE 488, SDC 488). S, F grading.

488 (Effective through Spring 2024) Professional Practice Coop/Internship I V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; integration of coursework with on-the-job professional experience. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 488, BIO ENG 488, CHE 488, CE 488, CPT S 488, E E 488, ME 488, MSE 488, SDC 488). S, F grading.

495 Internship in Bioengineering V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By instructor permission; BIO ENG 205; junior standing. Work experience related to academic learning. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems in Bioengineering V 1-4 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By instructor permission; sophomore standing. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. S, F grading.

525 Biomechanics 3 Methods for analysis of rigid body and deformable mechanics; application to biological tissue, especially bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendon and muscle. (Crosslisted course offered as BIO ENG 425/525, ME 525). Credit not granted for more than one of BIO ENG 425, BIO ENG 525, or ME 525. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

525 (Effective through Summer 2024) Biomechanics 3 Methods for analysis of rigid body and deformable mechanics; application to biological tissue, especially bone, cartilage, ligaments, tendon and muscle. (Crosslisted course offered as BIO ENG 425/525, ME 525). Credit not granted for more than one of BIO ENG 425, BIO ENG 525, or ME 525. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

541 Systems Bioengineering 3 Physiological systems emphasizing the cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, endocrine, musculoskeletal, nervous and sensory systems.

550 Cellular Bioengineering 3 Cellular biology integrated with engineering science; cellular phenomena from an engineering perspective; quantitative engineering principles for cellular-based materials, diagnostic devise and sensor designs.

556 Protein Bioengineering 3 Integrating molecular biology and engineering sciences to analyze, change, and design proteins' structure and function. Credit not granted for both BIO ENG 456 and 556. Recommended preparation: Organic chemistry and/or biochemistry. Offered at 400 and 500 level.


Chemical Engineering (CHE)

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101 Overview of Chemical Engineering 1 Current topics, issues, and career options in Chemical Engineering.

110 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 2 Course Prerequisite: CHE 101 with a C or better; CHEM 105 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 106, 345, or 348; MATH 171 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment in MATH 172, 182, 273, or 315. Introduction to chemical engineering; development of problem-solving skills.

201 Chemical Process Principles and Calculations 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 110 with a C or better, or BIO ENG 140 with an S, or junior standing; CHEM 106 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 345 or 348; MATH 172 or 182 with a C or better, or concurrent enrollment in MATH 273 or 315. Fundamental concepts of chemical engineering; problem-solving techniques and applications in stoichiometry, material and energy balances, and phase equilibria.

211 Process Simulation 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 201 with a C or better; MATH 315 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment. Computer solutions to problems in chemical engineering processing.

301 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 101, CHE 211, and CHEM 345 each with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; PHYSICS 202 and 212 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. Basic concepts and laws; property relationships; compression and liquefaction; phase equilibria; reaction equilibria; applications in stagewise processing.

302 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics II 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 301 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. Intermediate topics in chemical engineering thermodynamics; advanced phase and chemical reaction equilibrium (including the design of relevant chemical processes), non-ideal thermodynamics, and a microscopic description of thermodynamics.

310 Introduction to Transport Processes 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 201 with a C or better; MATH 315 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; BIO ENG 205 or both CHE 101 and CHE 211 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Chem Engr or Bioengr. Fundamentals of the phenomena governing the transport of momentum, energy, and mass.

310 (Effective through Summer 2024) Introduction to Transport Processes 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 201 with a C or better; MATH 315 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; BIO ENG 205 or both CHE 101 and CHE 211 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Chem Engr or Bioengr. Fundamentals of the phenomena governing the transport of momentum, energy, and mass. (Crosslisted course offered as CHE 310, BIO ENG 310).

321 Kinetics and Reactor Design 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 211 and 310 with a C or better; CHE 302 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. Chemical reaction kinetics applied to the design of reactors, non-ideal flow, mixing, catalysis.

332 Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 302 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; CHE 211 and 310 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. Design calculations, operations, and evaluation of equipment used in fluid flow, heat transfer, and evaporation.

334 Chemical Engineering Separations 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 302 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; CHE 211 and 310 with a C or better; CHEM 345 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. Design and evaluation of equipment used in continuous contacting.

352 Chemical Process Safety 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 321 with a C or better; CHE 332 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. Introduction to technical fundamentals of chemical process safety.

422 Catalysis: From Fundamentals to Industrial Applications 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 302 and 321 with a C or better. An introduction to modern catalysis systems for chemical engineers, with an emphasis on heterogeneous catalysis.

432 [M] Chemical Engineering Lab I 3 (1-6) Course Prerequisite: CHE 302, 321, 332 and 334 with a C or better; CHE 352 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; ENGLISH 402 or 403 with a C or better or concurrent enrollment; admitted to the major in Chemical Engr. Statistical design and analysis of experiments; safety; experiments in heat and mass transfer; separations, other unit operations, kinetics, control; technical reports and presentations.

433 [M] Chemical Engineering Lab II 2 (0-6) May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 credits. Course Prerequisite: CHE 432 with a C or better. Laboratory experiments in heat and mass transfer; separations, other unit operations, kinetics, control; design calculations; technical reports and presentations.

441 Process Control 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 302, 321, 332, and 334 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. Measuring instruments, automatic control, process and instrument characteristics and theory applied to industrial control problems.

450 Chemical Process Analysis and Design I 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 302, 321, 332, and 334 with a C or better; CHE 352 with a C or better or concurrent; ENGLISH 402 or 403 with a C or better or concurrent; admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. Chemical engineering design; computer tools; safety and environmental constraints; cost and equipment optimization.

451 [CAPS] [M] Chemical Process Analysis and Design II 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 450 with a C or better; junior standing. Development, design, and economic evaluation of chemical and related processes as practiced in industry.

461 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: MATH 315; admitted to a major in engineering or physical sciences; senior standing. Applied nuclear physics; application to the nuclear fuel cycle and nuclear reactor core design; nuclear reactor systems and safety. (Crosslisted course offered as ME 461, CHE 461).

462 Applied Electrochemistry 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 302 and 321 with a C or better; admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. Thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport processes that occur in a simple model electrochemical system and how to apply them into more complicated real systems.

463 Introduction to Upstream/Midstream Technology 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 301 with a C or better. An introduction for chemical engineers to oil and gas exploration, production, transportation, and storage.

465 Integrated Envirochemical Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 321 with a C or better; CHE 334 with a C or better. Application of chemical engineering principles in assessment and remediation of industrial problems in air pollution, water pollution, and solid and hazardous waste.

470 Biofilm Engineering 3 Medical and environmental biofilms; biofilm processes and biofilm control.

474 Metabolic Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 201 with a C or better; MATH 220 and MATH 315 with a C or better; BIO ENG 210 or CHE 211 with a C or better. Understanding metabolic properties of organisms such that cells can be modified for use as biochemical plants to produce desired bioproducts. (Crosslisted course offered as BIO ENG 455, CHE 474).

475 Biochemical Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 321 and 332 each with a C or better, OR BIO ENG 310 and 350 each with a C or better. Application of chemical engineering principles to the processing of biological and biochemical materials. (Crosslisted course offered as CHE 475, BIO ENG 475.) Credit not granted for both CHE 475/BIO ENG 475 and CHE 575. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

475 (Effective through Summer 2024) Introduction to Biochemical Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 321 and 332 each with a C or better, OR BIO ENG 310, and 340, and 350 each with a C or better. Application of chemical engineering principles to the processing of biological and biochemical materials. (Crosslisted course offered as CHE 475, BIO ENG 475.)

476 Biomedical Engineering Principles 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 310 with a C or better. The application of chemical engineering principles to biomedical processes. (Crosslisted course offered as CHE 476, BIO ENG 476.)

480 Pulp and Paper Manufacturing Process Engineering 3 Course Prerequisite: CHE 110 or 201, with a C or better; junior standing. Study of pulping and papermaking process chemistry and reaction engineering principles.

481 Special Topics in Chemical Engineering V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 credits. Pulp and paper processing, advanced separations, and atomistic methods in chemical engineering.

485 Interfacial Phenomena 3 Chemical and physical nature of the interface including the molecular basis for interfacial forces and resulting macroscopic phenomena. Credit not granted for both CHE 485 and 585. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

488 Professional Practice Coop/Internship I V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; integration of coursework with on-the-job professional experience. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 488, BIO ENG 488, CHE 488, CE 488, CPT S 488, E E 488, ME 488, MSE 488, SDC 488). S, F grading.

488 (Effective through Spring 2024) Professional Practice Coop/Internship I V 1-2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 6 credits. Course Prerequisite: By department permission. Practicum for students admitted to the VCEA Professional Practice and Experiential Learning Program; integration of coursework with on-the-job professional experience. (Crosslisted course offered as ENGR 488, BIO ENG 488, CHE 488, CE 488, CPT S 488, E E 488, ME 488, MSE 488, SDC 488). S, F grading.

495 Chemical Engineering Internship 2 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 credits. Students work full time in engineering assignments in approved industries with prior approval of advisor and industrial supervisor. S, F grading.

498 Technical Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 credits. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the major in Chemical Engineering. S, F grading.

499 Special Problems V 1-4 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: By instructor permission; sophomore standing. Independent study conducted under the jurisdiction of an approving faculty member; may include independent research studies in technical or specialized problems; selection and analysis of specified readings; development of a creative project; or field experiences. S, F grading.

510 Transport Processes 3 Transport of mass, energy, and momentum; unsteady and steady states as applied to chemical processing; macroscopic and microscopic analyses. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

527 Chemical Thermodynamics 3 Thermodynamic laws for design and optimization of thermodynamic systems, equations of state, properties of ideal and real fluids and fluid mixtures, stability, phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium; applications of thermodynamic principles. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

529 Chemical Engineering Kinetics 3 Interpretation of kinetic data and design of nonideal chemical reactors; fundamentals of heterogeneous catalysis, catalyst preparation, characterization, and theory. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

541 Chemical Engineering Analysis 3 Mathematical analysis of chemical engineering operations and processes; mathematical modeling and computer application. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

549 Biochemical Conversion Laboratory 2 (1-3) Analytical techniques in biomass characterization; bioproduct/biofuel production from renewable biomass including biochemical processes.

560 (Effective through Summer 2024) Biochemical Engineering 3 Chemical engineering applied to biological systems; fermentation processes, biochemical reactor design, downstream processing, transport phenomena in biological systems, biochemical technology. Cooperative: Open to UI degree-seeking students.

574 Protein Biotechnology 3 Provides skills, experiences, and knowledge to promote protein biotechnology research, research career preparation, and intellectual property commercialization. (Crosslisted course offered as MPS 574, CHE 574, MBIOS 574).

575 Biochemical Engineering 3 Application of chemical engineering principles to the processing of biological and biochemical materials. (Crosslisted course offered as CHE 475, BIO ENG 475.) Credit not granted for both CHE 475/BIO ENG 475 and CHE 575. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

581 Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering V 1-3 May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 9 credits. Filtration, reaction engineering, two-phase flow, non-Newtonian fluids, interfacial phenomena, fluidization, novel separations, biomedical engineering.

585 Interfacial Phenomena 3 Chemical and physical nature of the interface including the molecular basis for interfacial forces and resulting macroscopic phenomena. Credit not granted for both CHE 485 and 585. Offered at 400 and 500 level.

596 Research Methods and Communications I 2 Establish sound practices for responsible conduct of graduate research and ethics; techniques used for performing thorough literature searches, establishing and testing research hypotheses, and successful presentation of research results.

596 (Effective through Summer 2024) Research Methods and Presentation 3 Establish sound practices for responsible conduct of graduate research and ethics; techniques used for performing thorough literature searches, establishing and testing research hypotheses, and successful presentation of research results.

597 Research Methods and Communications II 1 Course Prerequisite: CHE 596. Establishing sound practices for presentation of research programs and research results.

597 (Effective through Summer 2024) Research Methods and Presentation II 2 Establishing sound practices for presentation of research programs and research results.

598 Research Seminar 1 May be repeated for credit. Seminar presentations on current topics in chemical engineering research. S, F grading.

700 Master's Research, Thesis, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their master's research, thesis and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 700 credit. S, U grading.

702 Master's Special Problems, Directed Study, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Independent research in special problems, directed study, and/or examination credit for students in a non-thesis master's degree program. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 702 credit. S, U grading.

800 Doctoral Research, Dissertation, and/or Examination V 1-18 May be repeated for credit. Course Prerequisite: Admitted to the Chemical Engineering or Engineering Science PhD program. Independent research and advanced study for students working on their doctoral research, dissertation and/or final examination. Students must have graduate degree-seeking status and should check with their major advisor/committee chair before enrolling for 800 credit. S, U grading.

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